Concurrent Sessions


The Leadership in Higher Education conference represents the leading thinking on strategic issues in higher education today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected presentations through a rigorous blind review process. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return as invited presenters with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the general sessions and creates content in these areas.

 

Invited Presenters


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

An Inclusive Classroom Framework: Resources, Onboarding Approach, and Ongoing Programs

Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Iowa State University

A taskforce of faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students worked under the direction the Iowa State University teaching center to develop a multi-pronged approach to build positive student learning experiences through creating inclusive classrooms. In this session, identify your own attitudes toward inclusion and determine how it impacts teaching, learn to enhance instructional skills that contribute to an inclusive campus environment, and learn about student support resources at our university. We describe how this campus-wide initiative moved from gathering stakeholder input to development of pre-workshop online training modules, supporting resources, and evaluation of the workshop offerings since the spring 2016 pilot.

Learning goals:

  • Discover the process followed and products created at Iowa State University
  • Learn best practices to further inclusive classroom initiatives
  • Develop a plan for a similar program at your institution
  • Implement a similar initiative at your home institution


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Best Practices in Assessment: Articulating Expectations

Katie Boyd, Auburn University

All regional accreditors require assessment. Unfortunately, on many campuses, assessment is viewed as a bureaucratic activity. One best-practice assessment strategy to make assessment more meaningful and manageable is to clearly articulate quality assessment expectations through the development of an “assessment rubric.” This rubric allows assessment practitioners to provide specific and actionable feedback about the quality of assessment in each program. At Auburn University, this feedback has made assessment interactive and less bureaucratic. This system also allows an assessment office to effectively maintain a pulse on the quality of assessment on campus and track improvements over time.

Learning goals:

  • Identify the essential elements of the assessment cycle
  • Discover the importance of clarifying quality assessment practice
  • Explore how faculty involvement in university-wide assessment efforts can impact an institution’s assessment culture
  • Apply at least one strategy from this session at your home institution


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Streamlining Academic Affairs and Institutional Effectiveness Efforts

Monique Baucham, Columbus Technical College and Tanjula Petty, Albany Technical College

The goal of higher education institutions is to prepare students to become contributing members of society. If departments are to align to achieve student success, they cannot operate in silos. Departments must move beyond the scope of one office, one title, and one building, and move into collaborative efforts that produce significant assessment and planning best practices and data-driven decisions. When academic affairs meets institutional effectiveness, processes are streamlined, more stakeholder voices are expressed, and there is a common focus on maintaining accreditation and regulatory compliance for the benefit of all campus constituents.

Learning goals:

  • Overcome challenges when transitioning into a new assignment
  • Foster a culture of collegiality and collaboration
  • Facilitate a needs assessment
  • Maintain compliance for all campus stakeholders

 

Advisory Board Presenters


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Between the Lines: Course Evaluations & Misaligned Definitions of Rigor

Lolita Paff, Penn State University-Berks

What makes a course “hard”? Is it the number of assignments? How much it counts? How it’s graded? How long it takes to complete? Something else? Research suggests students and faculty aren’t on the same page in defining rigor and this misalignment has significant implications for learning and retention. Join us as we read between the lines of course evaluations to explore definitions and perceptions of rigor and their implications for program retention, faculty development, and student success.

Learning goals:

  • Compare and contrast common student and faculty definitions of rigor
  • Read and interpret sample course evaluation comments to share and explore alternative meanings and their implications for faculty development
  • Identify strategies to facilitate conversations with faculty and students to promote alignment of perceptions and expectations of rigor


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Lecture is Not Dead: Understanding and Developing the Dynamic Lecture

Jennifer Patterson Lorenzetti, Hilltop Communications and managing editor for Academic Leader

Lecture has been an effective pedagogical method for centuries because it is about story-telling and human interaction, some of the most powerful, attention-grabbing tools at anyone’s disposal. The presence of a live, engaged human being will do more to ignite the passions of a group of students than will any canned multimedia presentation. However, not everyone who speaks to a class gives an effective lecture. We will explore the characteristics of the “dynamic lecture” with the goal of helping deans and department chairs assess the effectiveness of the lecture-based classroom and train instructor in ways to deliver lecture-based classes that hold student attention.

Learning goals:

  • Understand the characteristics of an effective lecture
  • Be able to devise assessments of lecture-based instruction
  • Feel confident offering training and suggestions to new faculty members who prefer lecture as their pedagogical approach


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Managing Conflict Within the Department

Bob Cipriano, ATLAS –Academic Training Leadership & Assessment Training

Conflict is inevitable. Being disrespectful and uncivil is a conscious choice. What many people fail to realize is that there are many positive effects that conflict can have on the overall efficacy of a department. This workshop is highly experiential and participatory in nature. Topics will include anger: myths and realities, knowing your “hot buttons,” buying time in a conflict, what not to do in a conflict, methods to diffuse anger, ways to manage conflict, and how to turn a conflict into a problem to be solved.

Learning goals:

  • Effectively use 10 tools mentioned in the previous conference and in Academic Leader articles
  • Identify positive and negative effects of conflict
  • Productively and positively communicate with an angry person
  • Build a positive work environment
  • Understand the role of an academic leader in managing conflict
  • Turn a conflict into a problem to be solved


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

More Tools for the New Deans' Toolbox

Thomas McDaniel, Converse College

We will examine the tools new deans need in their metaphorical toolbox to be successful in their leadership roles. It builds on the five tools discussed in a similar session at the previous Leadership in Higher Education conference in Atlanta in 2016, and includes such tools as WD-40, a flashlight, and a C-clamp. You are asked to suggest other tools that might help deans and other academic administrators.

Learning goals:

  • Effectively use 10 tools mentioned in the previous conference and in Academic Leader articles
  • Evaluate your own toolbox in terms of your abilities and needs
  • Discuss scenarios that offer opportunities to apply these tools
  • Determine what additional tools could be included in your personal dean’s toolbox


Track: Leadership and Management

Positive Academic Leadership

Jeffrey Buller, Florida Atlantic University

Positive Academic Leadership is a strategy that promotes identifying the most positive or constructive alternative in a difficult situation and focusing one's energy on pursuing that goal. It's not a matter of positive thinking; it's a way of making sure that we emphasize what's already working, the strengths of our programs and institutions, and our best (rather than our worst) instincts. With Positive Academic Leadership, people stop putting out fires and start making a difference.

Learning goals:

  • Stop wasting energy solving problems instead of building your program
  • Learn to take a problem-solving approach to academic leadership and avoid missing opportunities
  • Explore a systems approach to academic leadership to help see colleagues as more than just walking CVs, allowing use of their talents to the fullest

 

Selected Presenters


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

A Case Study: Crisis Communication During the September 2016 Charlotte Riots

Christopher Gonyar, Christy Jackson, and Stephen Ward, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; and Michelle McDermott and Kelly Hagerty, CRA, Inc.

In the last 15 years, there’s been an increase in the amount of violent, non-violent, sexual assault, and gun-related crimes on university campuses, and the potential for any of them is a top concern among university administrators. There is a growing climate of activism on college campuses, and how leadership responds (formally and informally) sends a message that quickly bolsters or damages leadership and institutional credibility. On September 20, 2016, during UNC Charlotte’s Founders Week, Keith Lamont Scott was shot one mile from campus. Amidst riots and protests, University administrators faced an important leadership and communication challenge: Keep stakeholders informed while also preserving the institution’s reputation.

Learning goals:

  • Learn principles to live by in leading communication during crises and emergencies
  • Explore scalable decision heuristics for guiding university responses in difficult situations
  • Learn practical lessons learned from common communication challenges shared by leaders across institutions
  • Hear advice for engaging internal and external stakeholders in building a proactive crisis communication plan


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

A Map for Successful Accreditation

Jacqueline Haverkamp, Otterbein University; Alicia Ribar, The University of South Carolina; and Patricia Keane, Otterbein University

Preparing for an accreditation site visit requires multi-year planning and an extensive team effort to ensure that a program is successful in meeting all accreditation standards. Knowing that ongoing assessment is key for accreditation success, and knowing there is a dearth of literature with specific directions on how to develop structures and processes that allow for continual evaluation and improvement, we will provide leaders of higher education with a map for accreditation success.

Learning goals:

  • Learn how to describe components of a dynamic evaluation plan
  • Learn how to identify departmental or program committee structures that facilitate execution of the evaluation plan
  • Learn how to communicate the evaluation plan and committee tasks to all faculty, administrators, and other stakeholders through an overall operational forum
  • Learn how to utilize technologic platforms to organize and document supporting evidence


Track: Leadership and Management

Assessing Organizational Health: Leadership, Sustainability, and Innovation

Hakim Lucas, Cory Potter, and Edrico Ambrister, Bethune-Cookman University

Institutions of higher education benefit tremendously from implementing a systematic approach to assessing organizational health. To effectively drive innovation and build sustainable strategic growth, healthy leadership must commit to assessing dissonance, behavior, perception, actions, and intent within each division. Participants will be introduced to the Leadership, Sustainability and Innovation (LSI) Model which provides a framework for assessing organizational health. In addition, we will present an analytical modeling approach to setting strategic targets.

Learning goals:

  • Identify the interconnection between leadership, innovation, and sustainability in relation to organizational health
  • Learn ways to apply the LSI Model to your institution
  • Explore and assess your leadership using the Strategic Growth and Sustainability Scorecard
  • Develop an awareness of WizCom, an analytical and predictive modeling tool, which considers wisdom and computation in setting future targets in strategic planning


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Brain-Based Coaching Strategies for Academic Leaders

Susan Robison

Department chairs often enter their positions with reluctance and little training. The interpersonal aspects of the job, e.g. annual reviews, performance evaluations, or other difficult conversations with faculty, can be especially challenging to the inexperienced chair. You will learn several powerful brain-based coaching skills to increase your skills and confidence for leadership that matters: transformational conversations that build institutional collegiality, civility, and engagement. You will practice skills in dyads and then shape a facilitator/volunteer demonstration of these skills. Participants will receive the curriculum of a one-year “Leaders as Coaches” program.

Learning goals:

  • Learn the neuroscience-based coaching skills that facilitate the co-creation of creative problem solving between a coach-leader and a client
  • Practice effective ASK coaching skills: (a) assessing motivation for change and stages of desired change through deep compassionate listening; (b) setting goals for coaching sessions and implementation strategies for reaching those goals and designing follow-up and accountability systems; and (c) keeping track of success over time
  • Participate in a demonstration of the skills with an opportunity to practice a subset of skills needed for applicable leader-faculty interaction
  • Apply skills to help academic leaders establish an atmosphere of collegiality and civility within their campus units


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Building an Evaluation/Assessment Framework: Perspectives from Three Administration Levels

Althea Pennerman and Chin-Hsiu Chen, Salisbury University; and Nomsa Geleta, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Leaders in higher education face constant demands for evidence of accountability and effectiveness. The presenters, representing three administration levels, will share a useful evaluation and assessment framework that can be a model for small institutions of higher education including Historically Black Colleges and Universities. We will use multiple scenarios, examples, and extensive research of the literature to cover a broad range of campus programs and academic disciplines in order to ensure relevance to a diverse audience. In addition, the input from the attendees through the sharing of their own experiences will also preserve relevancy of strategies shared in the presentation.

Learning goals:

  • Explore a brief overview of major evaluation and assessment trends
  • Discuss how the roles of leaders in higher education are increasingly affected by evaluation and assessment responsibilities
  • Discuss complex scenarios that present evaluation and assessment challenges
  • Work with case-based scenarios


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Changing the Light Bulb in Higher Education

David Silverberg, Ashland University

Many universities, their professors, and their students are waking up to the question “how can we transform our university to meet the needs of today’s professors and students?” I will use real-life depictions of how institutions of higher education are remaking themselves-mid-flight-by building new kinds of futuristic and humanistic programs and practices. We will explore thought-provoking and instructive insights into the personalities and policies that enhance, or detract from, institutional evolution and provides practical insights into key levers for targeted, transformational growth.

Learning goals:

  • Learn how administrators at other institutions have pursued, been challenged by, and worked to overcome the process of transformation
  • Consider alternative pathways to achieve your institutional goals for change and improved impact
  • Consider the professional growth necessary to help facilitate the desired institutional change in their department or field of impact


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Cross-Departmental Collaboration Among Chairs: Interprofessionalism in the Curriculum

Monique Jiménez, Tsui-Yee Chow, and Kristina Brown, Adler University

Interprofessional collaboration has become a necessary skill for many professions. Graduates must demonstrate the capacity to work effectively with professionals from other fields, and training in this area must be part of the curriculum. Department chairs and program directors must work together to identify learning opportunities for students to engage in interprofessional collaboration. We will focus on how to develop collaboration experiences for students in programs from different professions. Programs’ curricula should reflect this collaboration and include learning opportunities for students to engage in them.

Learning goals:

  • Identify interprofessional collaboration opportunities
  • Discuss strategies on how to develop the curricula
  • Develop a plan to obtain buy-in from faculty and administrators
  • Apply the acquired knowledge to your own program/department needs


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Cut the Fat: Creating Transformational Courses

Michael Gray, Bob Jones University

Faculty habitually load their courses with content that they treasure. Veteran faculty are particularly likely to have swollen courses that gain content with every iteration. We will discuss techniques that help leadership construct a faculty development strategy to use metacognition about academic expertise to make content cuts objective and painless. The resulting courses, though slimmed down, are absolutely not dumbed down.

Learning goals:

  • Understand commonalities in thinking processes
  • Recognize questions various academic domains were invented to answer
  • Recognize the distinction between facts and concepts
  • Use clarified thinking to articulate the core ideas of a domain’s system of explanation


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Designing a Promotion and Tenure System that Works (for All?)

Stephanie Juillerat, Azusa Pacific University

The promotion and tenure process can be fraught with anxiety and tension. Faculty may believe the promotion process has unreasonably high standards and does not take into account their unique contribution to the institution, while administrators may believe that the wrong elements are being evaluated. Everyone might think that the process has too much subjectivity. This presentation will share one institution’s development process and final faculty evaluation system built collaboratively and utilizing best practices in the literature, including lessons learned.

Learning goals:

  • Critique your own advancement systems in light of best practices
  • Discuss the obstacles that may prevent the implementation of best practices
  • Learn about the example of a successful program currently in place


Track: Leadership and Management

Directions are Only the Beginning

Deborah Friedman, Center for Creative Leadership

If a collegial department isn’t getting results, some think the problem starts with a failure in leadership. A leadership problem doesn’t necessarily mean there is a “leader” problem. Leadership is not just about the people at the top, but is a social process, enabling individuals to work together as a cohesive team to produce collective results. This session will show participants how to diagnose problems in their departments by focusing on three outcomes of effective leadership: Direction, Alignment, and Commitment (DAC™).

Learning goals:

  • Understand that leadership is a social process that produces Direction, Alignment, and Commitment (DAC™)
  • Learn to identify some of the indications that DAC™ is happening
  • Recognize some indications that leadership may not be happening
  • Develop strategies to achieve more collaborative teams


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

"Diverse & Inclusive Campus Community" Great Tagline. Now What?

Ann Lampkin-Williams, University of Michigan-Dearborn

Diversity and inclusion are often mentioned in college and university print and website materials. Chronicle the path taken to date by a regional Midwest campus that for many years has been acknowledged for its commitment to diversity. In 2010, a decision was made to forge a diverse and inclusive campus community. Soon after, the position of Assistant to the Chancellor for Multicultural Affairs was created. We will explore the issues that resulted.

Learning goals:

  • Explore the role of senior leadership
  • Discuss whether a campus can be diverse but not inclusive
  • Learn the characteristics of an inclusive campus community
  • Discuss opportunities and challenges for cultivating and sustaining similar initiatives


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Excellence in Higher Education: A Model for Assessment, Planning, and Improvement

Ralph Gigliotti, Rutgers University

Evaluation, planning, and continuous improvement are all critical competencies for leadership in higher education, especially given the many challenges facing colleges and universities and the diverse expectations from a variety of stakeholders. We will provide an overview of Excellence in Higher Education (EHE), a model for organizational assessment, planning, and improvement that has been designed to be fully applicable for planning and improvement within academic and administrative units based on best practices from successful organizations of all kinds, including a broad and integrated approach to assessment, planning, and improvement that is designed to be useful for all leaders in higher education, regardless of institutional or departmental size, type, or mission.

Learning goals:

  • Describe the seven review, assessment, and planning categories presented in the model
  • Identify recommendations for utilizing this planning tool in your unit, department, or institution
  • Practice using the model to assess one dimension of their units or departments


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Faculty Development on a Shoestring

Therese Madden and Marianne Delaporte, Notre Dame de Namur University

Many universities face budget cuts, especially those who have small endowments and are dependent upon tuition/enrollment. We will explore how an under-resourced university created a robust faculty development program. Charged simply with awarding small grants and hosting colloquiums, this committee grew in five years to take responsibility for major faculty development initiatives aimed at enhancing teaching effectiveness, high impact practices and faculty research. This occurred with no additional funding.

Learning goals:

  • Accurately assess faculty development priorities
  • Identify resources already on campus
  • Assess the gap between priorities and resources
  • Identify creative solutions for bridging that gap


Track: Leadership and Management

Follow Me: A Leadership Philosophy Framework for Leaders in Higher Education

Gretchen Oltman and Vicki Bautista, Creighton University

Leaders in higher education must have a clear sense of identity and vision in order to lead effectively. Through the development of a personal leadership philosophy, academics can articulate their leadership beliefs and expectations to their colleagues and employees. When charged with leadership positions, the varied expectations of today’s higher education landscape calls for a clear direction on how one will lead in times of uncertainty and constant change. Further, there is limited information and direction about how someone in higher education can develop a leadership philosophy that is poignant, meaningful, and applicable to the higher education setting. We will introduce a framework developed for leaders in higher education.

Learning goals:

  • Explain the purpose and benefits of a leadership philosophy for those in higher education settings
  • Summarize the components of a leadership philosophy
  • Create a working draft of a leadership philosophy
  • Distinguish the nuances between a teaching philosophy and a leadership philosophy


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Getting to Know Our Homeschooled Students

Jennifer Kerns, Des Moines Area Community College

The practice of homeschooling is becoming more and more widespread; therefore, it is important that higher education professionals learn more about this unique population of students. State regulation regarding homeschooling varies widely across the United States, thus creating an environment in which it is challenging to collect data that are representative of homeschooling populations. This discussion presents research collected on historical trends in homeschooling, homeschool regulation, and concerns of critics regarding how homeschooling affects student development. Additionally, it provides a look into the lives of six homeschooling families from a series of qualitative interviews. Three main themes emerged from the analysis of the data, each with multiple subthemes.

Learning goals:

  • Explore the history of homeschooling
  • Discuss how our homeschoolers differ from traditional students
  • Gain insight into the lived experience of the homeschooling family
  • Discuss issues related to homeschooling, like trends, regulation, and research


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Herding Cats: Developing an Engaging Faculty Development Program

Donna Qualters, Tufts University

Attracting a talented and diverse faculty is something all colleges and universities strive to accomplish. Equally important is retaining faculty by providing them with opportunities for discipline, leadership and pedagogical development. This goal makes designing effective faculty development opportunities a critical function of leadership. My work in faculty development, academic leadership and mentoring has used these methods and models university wide in multiple institutions ranging from small liberal arts colleges to top research universities with multiple campus and professional colleges. At each university, programs have grown, faculty engagement has increased and outcomes assessment is documenting growth in faculty knowledge, skills and their satisfaction in teaching, leadership and mentoring programs.

Learning goals:

  • Explore the theory supporting faculty engagement in development activities
  • Explore various models of faculty development and discuss how to engage faculty to make the most of these opportunities
  • Examine the administrative factors that need to be in place to encourage and support faculty development
  • Share ideas and models across institutional types


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Implementing the SEED (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) Initiative for Faculty

Kendra Killpatrick and Sandra Harrison, Pepperdine University

Issues of diversity and inclusion are at the fore front of the conversation at many college campuses across the country today. As the demographics of the student population at many institutions undergo rapid change, faculty attitudes and pedagogical practices must adapt and change to insure inclusivity and so that students of all backgrounds and cultures feel welcome and valued in a classroom environment. Seaver College implemented a SEED seminar during the 2016-17 academic year to promote meaningful and long-lasting diversity training for faculty and related staff members. We will particularly address questions about how to encourage faculty members to participate in the program and share results from assessment measures in the area of pedagogical change.

Learning goals:

  • Learn about the SEED program
  • Discuss strategies for implementing the SEED program at different institutions
  • Share the pedagogical changes resulting from faculty participation in SEED
  • Discuss affecting transformative change around issues of diversity and inclusion


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Integrating Diversity and Inclusion Into Program Development and Course Design

Ana Abad-Jorge and Maria Kronenburg, University of Virginia, School of Continuing & Professional Studies

Many underrepresented groups continue to feel excluded, isolated and marginalized while in college despite the significant increase in diverse student populations and attempts by higher education institutions to improve inclusive practice, policies, and culture. While there is much research on the value of diversifying the curriculum and applying new pedagogical approaches that demonstrate multicultural understanding and create inclusive learning environments, academic leaders should work collaboratively to support faculty in the creating program curriculum to promote greater integration of diversity and inclusion into course design and delivery.

Learning goals:

  • Discuss the value of diversifying the curriculum to promote authentic learning among our multicultural students
  • Discuss strategies for integrating of diversity and inclusion into course design
  • Identify inclusive teaching practices that promote an inclusive classroom
  • Discuss programmatic strategies, which support a diverse and inclusive curriculum


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Integration of Strategic Planning and Assessment Through an Electronic Theme-Based Portfolio Program

Matthew Dintzner, Kim Tanzer, and Evan T. Robinson, Western New England University College of Pharmacy

Intentional integration of planning, quality improvement, and assessment systems has been shown to enhance the performance of programs and operations in higher education. Program portfolios, sets of quantitative and qualitative data that describe a program and its unique characteristics, bring together information and provide it to stakeholders in an integrated way. In the College of Pharmacy at Western New England University, we have developed an electronic program portfolio that integrates assessment and strategic planning around the theme of “education as a journey.” The portfolio is comprised of longitudinal “dashboards” that facilitate program evaluation, benchmarking, planning, and improvement efforts.

Learning goals:

  • Explore a successful electronic, theme-based portfolio program
  • Learn to integrate planning, quality improvement, and assessment activities, resulting in the enhancement of programs and operations in higher education
  • Use our successful program as a potential model for your own assessment and strategic planning


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Institutionalizing the Use of Open Educational Resources: Strategies and Tactics

Erik Christensen, South Florida State College

The average college student spends $1,200 per year on textbooks which can be as much as one-third the cost of attending college for a year. Adopting OER textbooks can reduce the overall cost of higher education by up to 30 percent while improving student success through higher grades and increased enrollment/persistence compared to courses taught with traditional textbooks. This presentation provides both strategies and tactics on how to institutionalize the use of OER textbooks. Come and learn how to increase access to higher education by making it more affordable for your students.

Learning goals:

  • Explain what OER are
  • Explain the value OER bring to students, faculty, and institutions
  • Identify six strategies on institutionalizing OER
  • Develop a strategy to institutionalize OER at your institution


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Interim Leadership in Seasons of Institutional Change

Jamie Whitaker Campbell

As institutions respond to internal and external pressures, interim leaders are being used to fill leadership gaps in the absence of intentional succession planning. Such leadership requires a balance of temporary responsibility with the ability to make decisions that have significant, long-term institutional impact. To be successful, interim leaders must seek out professional development early, establish clear boundaries in their responsibilities, understand their role in the leadership team, and connect with permanent leaders for guidance in navigating decision-making in their context.

Learning goals:

  • Develop awareness of the tensions of interim leadership
  • Learn how to encourage dialogue and invite collaborative problem-solving
  • Discover ways to provide adaptable resources


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Loving Assessment: Reliable, Sustainable Evaluation from Basics to Automation

Kathy Norwood and Dirk Davis, California Baptist University

This private liberal arts university had the opportunity to lead a change initiative from manual assessment procedures for each course, to fully automating the process. We explore how transitioning to an automated assessment process has led to assessing every course each time it is taught. Additionally, we collect and assess data regarding course level outcomes, program level outcomes, and university outcomes. We will address issues of validity challenges with course assessment data, reliability challenges with data collection, and sustainability challenges involved with an ever-increasing scope of assessment responsibilities.

Learning goals:

  • Understand the conceptual foundation of program/university wide assessment
  • Apply systematic data collection to your current assessment procedures
  • Evaluate your current assessment practices for efficiency/effectiveness
  • Analyze your current assessment system for opportunities to automate


Track: Leadership and Management

Managing All Around in Academia

Seena Haines, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; Jenny VanAmburgh, Northeastern University; and Susan Stein, Pacific University

Effectively handling conflict in academic environments is a crucial component of establishing a collaborative culture. We need tools that help us differentiate the complex interactions that make up a conflict, that assist us determining the roots of conflict, and that provide us with reasonable options to remain focused on the forces that motivate the behavior of all participants, including ourselves. Prompt and effective conflict management methods can improve relationships and performance. Here, we will engage in solution-driven approaches to managing inevitable conflicts and confrontations that arise in higher education.

Learning goals:

  • Identify common causes which can lead to conflict
  • Determine participant's conflict style, given a case scenario
  • Examine participant’s experience regarding conflict resolution
  • Evaluate a conflict situation and explore possible step-by-step approaches to manage the conflict


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Online Faculty Development: Fewer Sit-Downs, More Buffets

Nicole Frank, Fort Hays State University

In the name of consistency, we often design online faculty development as if all faculty have the same goals. In essence, we inadvertently create mandated “dinner plates” of training content, and then require that participants “eat all of their dinner.” Yet, faculty are increasingly diverse in experience, course loads, and tenure-track/adjunct designations. This discussion provides concrete ideas for creating “buffets” of online training, and allowing faculty to choose the content that suits them best, while maintaining the consistency that chairs and deans want to see.

Learning goals:

  • Learn about the importance of choice and ownership, per adult learning theory
  • Learn how to discern critical objectives for faculty training at their institutions
  • Learn how to discern supplemental objectives for faculty training at their institutions
  • Create a framework for an online faculty training at your institution, combining critical and supplemental objectives, to create choice while meeting institutional needs


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Principles and Strategies of Highly Effective Faculty Development Programs

Victoria Nesnick, Hofstra University

A well-designed and effectively implemented faculty development program is especially important in today’s diverse population because it can: (1) provide a forum to ensure and maintain the integrity, strength, and vitality of the institution, (2) provide professional training in effective teaching, for faculty (experts in their field) who may have little or no such training, (3) enhance faculty and administrators’ self-efficacy levels for developing and implementing highly effective faculty development programs that impacts the teaching-learning process and student and faculty retention, and (4) help administrators clearly indicate the degree to which the institution values, supports, and is committed to enhancing its faculty’s and students’ personal and professional growth.

Learning goals:

  • Analyze benefits of various faculty development program models, at the individual, faculty, administrative, institutional, and student level
  • Learn to evaluate and use guiding principles and accompanying strategies for faculty development programs
  • Learn about creating programs that meet the interests, needs, and resources of their faculty
  • Explore enhancing your educational community’s self-efficacy level for developing and implementing highly effective faculty development programs


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

Professionals Transitioning Back to Academia: Helping Them Succeed

Michael Wiggins, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Professionals returning to academia from industry bring a wealth of recent knowledge and experience. The challenge is acclimating them to an environment that is much different from industry in terms of work expectations, research, and organizational environment or culture. This presentation will quickly review the literature about some key issues that are relevant across disciplines. The participants will collaborate to identify and discuss issues and solutions that are apply across disciplines in four key areas.

Learning goals:

  • Learn to identify appropriate candidates
  • Explore the transition to the classroom
  • Discuss developing scholarship and research capabilities
  • Learn to facilitate adapting to a different work culture that includes service


Track: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Retirement: Negotiating a "Win-Win" for Faculty and Institutions

Lisa Horne Early, Coppin State University and Elizabeth Rivera, State of Maryland, Office of the Attorney General, Educational Affairs Division

Faculty retirement can contribute to the viability of institutions, as institutions strategically plan to hire new faculty with the background and experience necessary to teach in new program areas. Faculty retirement creates the budget for institutions with limited financial resources to hire new faculty. We will highlight how faculty retirement can contribute to the viability of an institution. We will discuss national data on faculty retirement concerns, identify retirement incentive options for leaders to consider, and share key points of one university’s success negotiating faculty separation agreements.

Learning goals:

  • Know contributing factors of faculty retirement decisions
  • Identify retirement incentive options
  • Know how to engage faculty in conversations about retirement
  • Discuss terms of separation agreements
  • Understand potential legal pitfalls


Track: Faculty Hiring and Development

The ConcepTest: A Glimpse into an Evidence-Based Faculty Development Program

Melinda Maris, Southern Vermont College

The findings of John Hattie and Eric Mazur can provide a framework for an evidence-based faculty development program. Hattie’s Visible Learning study indicated that feedback has a key impact on student learning outcomes. Mazur’s ConcepTest is a formative assessment strategy that provides informative, real time feedback to students and teachers and empowers students to develop skills that support deep learning, including self-assessment and self-adjustment. We will model one component of a faculty development program grounded in data on how people learn and based on best practices for teaching.

Learning goals:

  • Apply prior knowledge to categorize pedagogical strategies on the basis of their impact on student learning
  • Analyze evidence supporting the efficacy of pedagogical strategies
  • Practice formative assessment techniques that can be applied in the classroom to promote deep learning
  • Develop one or more ConcepTests that they can incorporate in their courses; revise their work on the basis of group feedback


Track: Leadership and Management

Prevent, Target, and Troubleshoot Online Faculty Performance Concerns through Coaching and Community-Building

Bethanie Hansen, American Public University Systems

Vision and leadership can motivate employees to perform well, enjoy their work, and innovate. Yet in the competitive climate of online higher education, managing minimum faculty engagement and performance ensure a consistent student experience. Balancing basic performance management with vision and direction is challenging but possible. In this presentation, participants will learn best practices to lead and manage online faculty and strategies to prevent, target, and troubleshoot faculty performance concerns.

Learning goals:

  • Gain fresh insights and tools to build community among remote faculty employees
  • Learn to minimize management demands
  • Explore ways to provide vision and direction
  • Discover how to maximize faculty performance through coaching


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Relational Leadership from the Middle

Kathy Burlingame, Galen College of Nursing

Mid-level leaders are essential to organizational success. The turnover of mid-level leaders and loss of human capital limits the academic unit and organizations’ goal achievement. Based upon the results of a phenomenological research study, this session will address identification of potential leaders, socialization, orientation, areas of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and factors which influenced nursing deans and directors to accept and later leave their positions.

Learning goals:

  • Learn recommendations for supervisors, mid-level leaders, and team members
  • Discover strategies to thrive in diverse academic environments
  • Equip current and future leaders with conflict management tools and change theories


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Moral Framework Toolbox

Joel Murray, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

New deans receive little to no training, yet they must resolve serious ethical dilemmas in their practice. Many may resort to the moral framework(s) with which they are familiar in their daily lives, yet it is unknown whether doing so provides them with the tools they need. We will examine how to resolve ethical dilemmas using two moral frameworks: Rawls’ “justice as fairness,” and Blum’s “particularity.” Participants will learn how to apply the frameworks to their own ethical dilemmas so that they can resolve these dilemmas from an informed standpoint.

Learning goals:

  • Understand Rawls’ and Blum’s moral frameworks
  • Apply these moral frameworks to your own ethical dilemmas
  • Develop a toolbox to resolve ethical dilemmas effectively


Track: Leadership and Management

Shaping a Culture of Faculty Leadership

Sara Zeigler, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences; Russell Carpenter, Noel Studio for Academic Creativity; Matthew Winslow and Lori Wilson, Eastern Kentucky University; and Jennifer Wies, Ball State University

Faculty often provide administrative services in addition to teaching as a result of a distributed leadership model. Skill-based training, philosophical development, and peer networking are essential for effective leadership at all levels. To meet these needs, the presenters established a Faculty Leadership Institute targeting faculty prior to the onset of significant leadership responsibilities.

Learning goals:

  • Identify the unique characteristics facing faculty and administrators
  • Leverage institutional cultural strengths to shape site-specific programs
  • Develop a structure and process for implementing a two-day faculty leadership institute
  • Design an assessment process for understanding faculty leadership development


Track: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Succeeding and Thriving the First Year in Your Administrative Position

Reza Karimi, Pacific University School of Pharmacy

The first year in any dean or department chair position is a rookie year during which one needs to map pathways and identify tools to not only maintain the operation of the college/department but build a trusting and lasting relationship with faculty, staff, students, and upper administration. I will share a series of best practices to discuss four learning goals: building trust and collegiality; negotiating and managing budget; building shared governance; and establishing and implementing strategic goals. Similarly, we will explore ways of avoiding pitfalls to make a smooth transition into a dean or chair position.

Learning goals:

  • Learn to build trust and collegiality
  • Discover ways to negotiate and manage the budget
  • Explore techniques for building shared governance
  • Learn to establish and implement strategic goals


Track: Leadership and Management

Succession Planning in Higher Education

Shelly Olson, Chippewa Valley Technical College

Research on an aging workforce, including current executive leaders and their successors, suggests that technical colleges will have a limited pool of qualified applicants to fill executive leadership positions. Therefore, a need exists to prepare developing leaders to meet the multifaceted issues facing technical colleges. Succession planning is a tool or practice that is used to help organizations, including schools, transition between a seasoned employee and a newly-hired individual.

Learning goals:

  • Review a succession planning model
  • Identify advantages and disadvantages of a succession plan
  • Identify positions integral to the college’s forward movement


Track: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Undergraduate Curriculum Enhancements: Mapping Competencies into Courses from Introductory Engagement to Mastery Using Progressive Learning Objectives and System Outcomes Assessment

Jennifer Aberle, Colorado State University

We will describe how we implemented a major overhaul of the undergraduate curriculum in the department of Human Development and Family Studies at Colorado State University in order to enhance the education and marketability of our students. We will present the guiding principles that we discovered can be utilized across academic disciplines. 

Learning goals:

  • Discuss the important contributions of creating concentrations
  • Learn to create and implement learning objective
  • Explore revising coursework to match the progression of learning objectives
  • Learn about outcomes measurement


Track: Leadership and Management

Using Leadership and Design Thinking to Solve Wicked Problems

Jennifer Chotiner, Mount Saint Mary's University

Higher education is in a critical period of transformation, and now more than ever, mechanisms of leadership that have demonstrated reproducible success in multiple contexts are vital if we are to advance education and growth. The deepening divide between traditional academic structures and exponential changes in information, technology and consumerism one can bridge with effective and dynamic evidence-based leadership. Design thinking is an organized method of thought and action—based in the principles of cognitive science—that can be successfully utilized by multiple facets of leadership.

Learning goals:

  • Explore methods of how all campus stakeholders can work together to transform large institutional ideals and goals into a meaning-making initiatives
  • Understand how ‘wicked problems’ can be reframed as data that can be used in creating buy-in and developing solutions
  • Analyze how to find and support leaders at all levels through empowerment, creation and ownership
  • Synthesize the methods of design thinking into management action plans


Track: Best Practices in Higher Education

What Your Adjuncts Wish You Knew

Jennifer Patterson Lorenzetti, Hilltop Communications and managing editor for Academic Leader

Over half of all college instructors in the United States are non-tenure track, contingent faculty members, a proportion that is unlikely to decrease in the near term. Using adjuncts can allow an institution to better manage its budget and its instructional resources, but it often creates a climate that is demotivating to the very instructors it depends upon. We will explore the latest research on the adjunct experience, generating actionable ideas for integrating adjuncts into your department or college in ways that make better use of their talents and motivate them be enthusiastic members of your team.

Learning goals:

  • Understand the trends in the use of adjunct faculty
  • Identify the “pain points” adjunct faculty experience
  • Devise solutions for these “pain points” that will work at your institution
  • Consider which battles are worth fighting on behalf of your adjunct faculty

Evan T. Robinson  

Gretchen Oltman