Concurrent Sessions

The Teaching Professor Conference represents the best thinking on issues related to teaching and learning today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return for invited sessions with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected sessions through a rigorous blind review process. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the selected sessions and creates content in these areas.

⸻ Look for sessions in the tracks: ⸻

Preparing Your Course Assessing Learning Student Engagement
Technology Tools for Teaching Online Teaching and Learning Teaching Specific Student Populations
Outside the Classroom Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Teaching in the Health Sciences
Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated For New Faculty Faculty Support

Preparing Your Course

Advisory Board Session

The Resilient Classroom

Neil Haave, professor, University of Alberta

Although students come to our classroom to learn, it is often the case that some students actively and passively resist our efforts to support their learning. One response to mitigate student resistance to learning is to design our classrooms to promote students’ resilience for learning. This workshop will provide opportunities to discuss our experiences of learners’ resistance and consider what teaching practices, policies, and conversations might build students’ resilience when confronted by failures and mistakes which are hallmarks of learning.


Advisory Board Session

Setting the Table for Learning

Lolita Paff, associate professor, Penn State Berks

Learning is food for the mind, but are students consuming fast food or fine dining in our classes? Fast food is convenient, homogenous, and therefore unremarkable; quickly consumed and forgotten. In contrast, restaurants requiring reservations signal that dining there will be a wonderful experience, one that requires planning ahead, fostering anticipation of a memorable event worth waiting for. Leaving aside the issues of costs and calories, this interactive session uses the metaphor of fine dining as a framework to identify instructional strategies that promote engagement and learning. We’ll do this by exploring menu language (inclusivity), dress codes (conduct and policies), menu items (expectations about content and instruction), and chef’s specials and dessert carts (curiosity, interest and motivation).


GAME ON!…In the Classroom

Deana Jaber, Eric Bubar, Amanda Wright, and Susan Agolini, Marymount University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Gamification has emerged as an excellent tool for improving educational outcomes. Game based learning is becoming a more attractive model for education with the ubiquity of game creation tools, recognition of games as effective learning tools and growth of individuals who grew up with gaming into roles as teachers. At the turn of the 21st century, online teaching became increasingly popular in higher education. Unsurprisingly, the continuing advancement of technology is an important reason why online teaching continues to expand in higher education. Although the growing presence of online teaching is telling of its significance, the 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has solidified its importance. To address the academic concerns that emerged during the ongoing health crisis, educators sought pedagogical tools that could potentially enhance the online teaching experience to ultimately foster a more engaging and socially connected online learning environment. In this presentation we discuss the games we used in STEM content areas and showcase our work in this collaborative area by presenting three different styles of games; 1) the use of 3D printed manipulatives, 2) the creation of a chemistry card game, both a hard copy and a digitized version 3) creation of an interdisciplinary STEM Escape Room in virtual reality on the Oculus Quest 2. These techniques can all be adopted widely to create a diverse range of gamified learning experiences both in person and virtually.


Going Backward to Move Forward: Preparing for Hybrid Teaching

Amy Pinkerton and Mia Lamm, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Insights from recent trends indicate that hybrid learning models that combine traditional face-to-face classroom instruction with online learning will persist into the future. It is crucial to ensure that hybrid learning experiences effectively engage students through alignment with learning goals (Wasik & Bray, 2020; Thurber, 2021). Presenters propose an expanded Backwards Design framework that acknowledges the learning environment in the design process. The benefit of using this model when developing a hybrid course is the intentionality in planning for learning goals and experiences through careful alignment and organization. This presentation prepares faculty to (1) identify and discuss the key components and special considerations of hybrid learning environments; and (2) incorporate and apply these considerations into an expanded Backwards Design framework.


Teaching Culture, Writing Intensive Courses

Monica Rossi Miller, Queensborough Community College CUNY
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This presentation focuses on unfinished, exploratory writing, which, based on research into the writing processes of expert writers shows its strong effectiveness for enhancing learning for students. Exploratory writing in low stakes assignments is the kind of exploratory, thinking-on-paper writing we do to discover, develop, and clarify our own ideas. Exploratory writing is typically loosely structured and tentative, moving off in unanticipated directions as new ideas, complications, and questions strike the writer in the process of thinking and creating. Participants will take away three reasons why I cannot imagine teaching a class without an exploratory writing component: A thinking piece assignments continually present students with higher-order critical thinking problem; they change the way students approach course reading; and they create higher levels of class preparation and richer discussions.


Online Course Design Incorporating Eight Best Learning Practices

Elina Ibrayeva, University of Nebraska–Lincoln
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This presentation will help participants refresh their knowledge of the most recent developments in the science of learning. It will also help teachers to become much more intentional about incorporating best teaching methods while designing their online and on-campus courses. This presentation is centered around eight best learning practices identified by the recent science of learning (repeated practice, use of frameworks, integration, application or retrieval, transfer of learning, use of stories and analogies, storehouse vs snakeskin model of education, and multimedia.) Participants will be asked to share their own use of these and other best learning practices. Participants will be also asked to recognize these learning practices in eight online graduate Applied Organizational Behavior course assignments. Participants will be able to realize that most assignments can incorporate multiple best learning practices at the same time.


Hop Out of Escape Rooms Using Padlets

Patrick Sheridan, Saint Leo University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Padlets represent a useful pedagogical tool for online learning. Padlets are routinely used as a forum for discussions, for icebreaker activities, formative assessments, and for multi-media homework projects.

To increase student engagement and strengthen mastery of course content, themed Padlets were created in the format of escape rooms. Students were polled at the start of organic chemistry I. They were asked to identify their favorite movies, books, poems, idols, foods, and hobbies, etc. The escape rooms were then framed around this thematic information. Escape rooms provided an opportunity for small groups to participate in active learning. The competitive activities worked to energize students and promote critical thinking and problem-solving skills through collaboration.


The Naked Truth About Cheating: Prevention is Key

Deborah Testerman and Leslie Koberna, Texas Woman’s University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Studies show one third of students admit to cheating while in school. Cheating has become a multibillion-dollar industry. Cheating creates loss of self-respect, becomes a habit, devalues education, and encourages a culture of mistrust and cutting corners. It is important for faculty to recognize ways students cheat in the classroom and online environments to reduce cheating. Takeaways from this session will be a better understanding of why students cheat, an explanation of how students cheat in online and face to face environments, and strategies to prevent student cheating.

Assessing Learning

Improving the Approach and Accuracy of Self-Grading in Higher Education

Les Harman, Biola University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Self-assessment has been increasingly used as a necessary learning and assessment strategy in higher education (Yan 2020). The process of self-evaluation can develop learners’ metacognitive strategies (Bourke 2018) and has proven to be very beneficial for career preparation. Yet, student self-grading is still underutilized in higher education primarily due to lack of student training which has led to disproportionally high grades and inaccurate self-evaluation. In this session, we will present a simple, hour-long onboarding training exercise for students that is directly aimed at improving the initial thinking and practice of self-grading. The primary goal of this training is to improve the accuracy of self-evaluation for first-time self-graders. As a result of this student tutorial, educators can feel more confident in providing self-grading assignments in their college classrooms.


A Grading System That Works: How Specifications Grading Empowers Students

Darshon Reed and Shannon Riedmueller, University of Central Arkansas
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Grading student work is a critical step in assessing student achievement of course learning outcomes. However, there is little standardization across institutions and grading practices vary considerably. Grading on the curve, grade inflation, and varying grade interpretations complicate the practice, leading to a system that is inherently broken and damaging to both faculty and students alike. An alternative to the current grading system is specifications grading. Specifications grading allows students to earn all the points associated with the work, or none of them, depending on if their work meets particular specifications laid out by the instructor. This session introduces the audience to the specifications grading system and provides an example of its implementation in various disciplines. During this session, participants will learn specifications grading theory and framework, how it promotes a mastery goal orientation, and how to implement it in a course.


Address Your Assess: Universal Design for Assessment

Raven Chakerian, Oregon State University and Renee O’Neill, University of Denver
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Do you feel confident in your ability to create inclusive assessments that allow many different types of learners to express what they know? Do you want every student in your class to have authentic opportunities to show you what they know? Participants in this session will explore ways of applying the basic principles of universal design to revise existing assessments or to create something fresh. We will review a variety of approaches and tools that can be used to create or revise assessments that are accessible, meaningful and challenging. We will also review tech tools that can enhance accessibility in assessment design for any modality (traditional, online, or hybrid).


Be More SIRI with Feedback

Dani Schwinn, Central Community College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This session will redefine feedback and how to effectively work with students to improve their competencies over time. Specific, Individualized, Real-time, Instructional feedback will help guide instruction during lectures and give students clear directions. Participants will leave with research-based practices, examples, and tools to improve instruction and feedback for a variety of learners.


Holistic Assessments: A Better Way to Assess Student Learning

Mark Hussey and Alyson Hussey, Front Range Community College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Students should learn in college. However, our most prevalent assessment practice, points-based grading schemes, undermines that goal. Students learn best when they develop intrinsic motivation and a “deep learner” mindset. Points-based assessments foster the opposite effects: externally motivated students with fixed mindsets who simply game our grading schemes for points. We argue against both numerical & contract-based grading schemes, and favor of a holistic model that uses narrative feedback and critical reflection to assess student learning. This holistic model subverts the point and task-based assessment tradition with a more equitable, transformative, and meaningful model. In our workshop, participants will define holistic learning outcomes and gain strategies for assessing learning based on those outcomes rather than mindless point accumulation or task completion.


Mini-guide for Reflective Practice: Self-assessment Tool in the Classroom

Cheryl Martin, Scott Greenberger, Amy Anderson, Tara Chavez, and Kelly Maguire, Grand Canyon
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The Mini-guide for Reflective Practice (mGRP) was created by a team of researchers in a Reflective Practice Lab and is based on the Greenberger (2020) Guide for Reflective Practice. The presenters will share personal examples of how to use the mGRP in a variety of classroom settings, modeling for the participants the diverse usage of this guide for self-reflection and self-assessment. After attending this presentation, attendees will be able to implement the mGRP as a strategy by which they and their students could self-assess their own accomplishments regarding course objectives and learning outcomes.


No More Extra Credit: Rethinking Assessment with Emerging Grading Techniques

Kate Williams, Georgia Institute of Technology
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Grade disputes. Negotiating for points. Extra credit. These emotionally charged and time-intensive issues are common with traditional grading frameworks that increase competition, decrease intrinsic motivation, and punish early failure. At this interactive session, participants will identify common challenges inherent in traditional grading. We will explore alternatives to traditional grading, including equitable grading, specifications grading, and un-grading, followed by the presenter’s own experience with alternative grading techniques. Finally, participants will create an implementation plan that will allow them to begin to incorporate elements of an emerging grading system that fits their specific goals and situation.


What’s Backward about Backwards Design? Creating an Aligned Course

Debbi McCuin, Mount Marty University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

In teacher training, teachers are taught to start, embed, and end with their student learning outcomes in mind. Professors, on the other hand, are experts in their content discipline, and may have little to no formal training in teaching itself. In this session, we will go over the importance of aligning a course’s instructional tools and materials, activities, assignments and assessments with carefully worded course objectives. Considered one of the “best practices” in teaching, having a “backwards design” mindset works for face to face and online courses alike.


Feedback that Feeds: Engaging Learners and Closing the Evaluation Loop

Jeffrey Smith, Otterbein University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Graded or non-graded? High stakes or low stakes? Formative or summative? Any practical decision with respect to how we evaluate our students has a single directive at its core—empowering the individual to learn from the assessment. No test, essay, or performance task is an island unto itself. All are meant to spur more thoughts, more investigation, more growth. Instructors are challenged to provide feedback that feeds engendering reflection and action by students. During this session, we will examine two specific techniques (adaptive single-level rubrics, color-coded queries) that can be used in any discipline, encouraging students to actually tune into the feedback and self-regulate. Samples of assignments, tools, artifacts of work, and (most importantly) students’ movements beyond the evaluation will be shared to foster a discussion of theory into practice for learning agency.


How Do We Preserve Academic Integrity Without Proctoring?

Sarah Lublink, Florida Southwestern State College
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

When creating assignments for students, it is easy to feel torn between creating a straightforward objective test and a written assignment. The former requires no grading time but is difficult to administer without some form of proctoring or enormous question banks. The latter can be administered without proctoring but takes a long time to grade. In addition, in grading such assignments it can be hard to separate a student’s mastery of the learning outcomes from their mastery of the written word. In this short presentation I will show how I’ve used question banks to randomize student tests and quizzes in an innovative way which creates assessments that can be administered without proctoring and take only a moderate amount of time to grade. Participants will come away with a new understanding of the functionalities of question banks in quizzes as well as ideas for creating meaningful assessments that aren’t too much of a grading burden.

Student Engagement

Invited Session

The Next Normal: Re-engaging Students in the Hybrid Classroom

Heather Gilmour, assistant professor, Sport Management and Julie Wienski, assistant professor, Sport Management, Springfield College
60-Minute Session

This interactive session will focus on the increasing challenges of the hybrid classroom, given the continued COVID fatigue students and faculty feel each day. This session will examine the ways that Generation Z faces the classroom and discuss some strategies to humanize teaching to reach students where they are—emotionally and academically. The presenters will discuss how the experience teaching both online and hybrid have impacted their pedagogy.


Invited Session

Evidence-based Strategies for Reducing Student Resistance to Active Learning

Michael Prince, professor of chemical engineering, Bucknell University
60-Minute Session

Active learning has consistently been shown to improve numerous student outcomes. Despite this, the adoption of active learning in undergraduate classes has been slow. One of the barriers to adoption of active learning is the fear of student resistance, manifested as students not participating or giving low teaching evaluations at the end of the semester. This session provides evidence-based strategies to reduce student resistance drawn from a multi-institution NSF funded research project. At the end of this session participants will be able to: identify ways students respond to active learning; articulate strategies to reduce student resistance and describe how to implement several of them; and develop plans to successfully adopt active learning and reduce student resistance in their courses.


Invited Session

Emotionally Intelligent Teaching that Leads to Inclusion and Student Success

David Katz III, davidkatzpresents.com
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

In this multi-dimensional, interactive, experiential, and fun presentation we will learn that educating is about empowering others, and empowering others requires inclusive, positive, safe, connected, and affirming relationships. We’ll learn as educators we have a profound impact upon the emotional state of those we engage with each day, and that the neuroscience confirms that the emotional domain powerfully impacts cognition, persistence, motivation, self-efficacy, and performance. We will then practice skills and model behavior that helps create positive, motivated, engaged collaboration which leads to student success. The primary objective is to further empower us as educators by wrapping skills around these primary concepts while we share with each other and have some fun.


Creativity and Student Engagement: Igniting a Spark in Your Classroom

Cynthia Ramsey and Oeida Hatcher, University of Lynchburg
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Enhancing one’s creative abilities has long been an assumption of a liberal arts education; however, today’s higher education society finds itself dealing with students whose educational focus has solely revolved around finding the one ‘right answer’. This leaves little room for creative thinking or assignments that encourage working ‘outside of the box’, As educators, if we are looking for creative qualities but teach only in a manner that rewards memorization, then we are not tapping into their full potential. Though definitions of creativity vary, common characteristics include curiosity, originality, imagination, and divergent thinking. Ideas for assessment; essential questions; and problem solving are explored including the Torrance (Incubation) and Johnson (Active Learning) models, which provide examples heightened class anticipation leading to increased student learning.


Enhancing Engagement in the Higher Ed Classroom: A Baker’s Dozen of Practical Engagement Strategies

Pamela Kramer Ertel, Middle Tennessee State University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Student engagement involves capturing student attention, curiosity, interest and enthusiasm in the learning process which impacts student motivation and learning achievement (ed.glossary.org) This session will explore five types of student engagement (Social, Intellectual, Behavioral, Emotional, and Physical), as well as the benefits of such engagement. A baker’s dozen of practical engagement strategies will be demonstrated so that they can be used to engage higher education students in any discipline. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of the different types of engagement, along with a wealth of practical strategies they can apply in their own classrooms to enhance student engagement and learning.


How to Foster a Growth Mindset in Your Students

Melissa Michael, John Brown University and Laura Perkins, Southside Elementary, Siloam Springs
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

A fixed mindset is a belief that one’s talents, skills, and intelligence are fixed traits. This belief has detrimental effects on a student’s achievement regardless of their age or what content they are learning. Research shows that helping students to develop a growth mindset can increase student achievement significantly. There are several strategies teachers can use to help change students’ mindset in the classroom, which ultimately helps them in all areas of their academic and personal life. This session highlights two teachers’ efforts to change their students’ mindsets and increase learning in their classrooms. Specific growth mindset strategies were implemented in both classrooms, showing that these strategies can work across grade levels and disciplines. Session participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the research, their own teaching practices, and develop ideas for changes in their classrooms.


Implementing Team-based Learning in the Classroom

Violet Kulo, Christina Cestone, and Hyun-Jin Jun, University of Maryland Baltimore
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Team-based learning (TBL) is a flipped instructional approach consisting of a sequence of connected elements in which students prepare out of class and apply knowledge in class. In this session, faculty will experience, learn, and discuss the application of the TBL instructional sequence. Facilitating a shared understanding of the TBL process and its execution will allow faculty to adapt new instructional approaches and/or modify existing instructional activities. Faculty participants will learn the fundamental premise of TBL, the flow and application of a TBL session, and assessment in team-based learning modules.


Let’s Get Engaged with Cooperative Learning Structures

Melissa Schettler, William Penn University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

A consistent challenge that many instructors in higher education face is low engagement among students in the classroom. How do we, as instructors, plan activities that foster and support engagement from our students? Highly structured cooperative learning strategies that are explicitly taught to students provide an opportunity to significantly increase engagement from learners in the classroom and thus lead to increased student learning.


Preparing Students for Profession with an Interactive Elevator Pitch Activity

Nicole Flink, Weber State University and Julie Ravenscraft, Arizona State University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Students are often required to introduce themselves during networking events, career fairs, or job interviews. A common technique used in such settings is an “Elevator Pitch.” This conference session outlines a structured learning activity that helps students create and practice a professional introduction. This experiential learning activity allows students to practice a professional introduction using technology while providing feedback for self-reflection and overall improvement.
In this session, participants will learn how to: deliver a hands-on activity for students to develop and deliver a professional introduction; adapt the activity for seated, online, and virtual course modalities; leverage technology to provide students with self-reflection; and peer-review feedback to reduce instructor time spent on providing student feedback.


Structuring Discussions in Synchronous Classes to Maximize Student Engagement

Kamil Hamaoui, Westchester Community College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This presentation describes a method for structuring in person or synchronous remote class discussions based upon empirically supported design principles for the flipped classroom, Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive processes, and the model of critical thinking promoted by the Foundation for Critical Thinking. Prior to class, students submit a pre-discussion post in which they take a position on the issue and describe and apply relevant concepts and information from course materials and online sources. During class, students discuss the issue in small groups and practice asking evaluative questions to further critical thinking. After class, students submit a post-discussion post in which they synthesize the various points raised and critically reflect upon how their thinking developed. In this session, attendees will experience a simulated discussion with attendees in the role of students.


Transformational Teaching in a Culturally Passive Environment: A Missing Ingredient

Julie Kjeer, Bethany Lutheran College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

If lecturing transfers information from the professor’s notebook to the student’s notebook without passing through the minds of either, then why is lecture still the most frequently used teaching method in higher education classrooms? Despite research demonstrating that active learning leads to higher levels of conceptual understanding, far too many courses continue to employ lecture as the sole teaching technique. Come and discuss new active learning research, including lesser-known benefits that show promise for improving equity and inclusion. Participants are invited to reflect on their teaching philosophies through the lens of transformational teaching and brainstorm strategies for breaking down some of the barriers that can prohibit active learning. During this process, we will highlight a key, yet often missing, ingredient necessary for the success of student-centered learning.


Transforming Class Discussion to Support Free Expression, Academic Inquiry, and Democratic Engagement

Leila Brammer, University of Chicago
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Discourse rests at the nexus of the entangling of academic inquiry, freedom of expression, democratic practices, and civic education. The testing and refining of ideas necessary for academic inquiry depends on the ability to seek out and engage multiple perspectives as well as difference and disagreement. The session’s focus on principles and processes of free expression and discourse as well as models for fostering robust, inclusive, and productive class discussion provides participants with an understanding of discourse and the limits of current models; an ability to reimagine and transform discourse; and models and practices to embed in the classroom.


Easy Metacognitive Strategies to Take Reading to New Heights

Barbara Boschert, Coahoma Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Students, especially at-risk students, arrive on college campuses often lacking the proper preparedness to cope with the amount and the complexity of the assigned reading. Metacognition or “thinking about thinking,” is a widely studied learning theory that falls under the umbrella of constructivism. The definition of metacognition and its application will be addressed. Participants will receive several handouts of strategies to jump start metacognitive practices.


Flipping Software Application Instruction in Higher Education

Megan Bell, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

The literature supports use of the flip to teach “procedural knowledge,” a concept which ranges from software skills to medical education, in higher education. There is a gap in the literature on whether the flip is useful for teaching software skills to higher education students. This presentation shares results of a study comparing two instruction methods for teaching software skills to graduate students. The comparison assessed knowledge retention, instruction satisfaction and student confidence using the software and was implemented to encourage student engagement during software instruction sessions. Instructors evaluated whether there was a difference between using flip classroom model with active learning compared to in-class lecture and active learning regarding graduate students’ confidence using software, instruction satisfaction, and retention of software skills.


Increasing Classroom Engagement: How to Pop the Right Kind of Question

Kaci Bohn, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The number one killer of in-class student questions is the faculty statement, “Are there any questions?” When this question is asked, most pharmacy students are afraid to speak out due to fear of embarrassment or looking unintelligent. Questioning is by far the most common verbal communication behavior used in pharmacy education and is critical for students and faculty to learn from one another. This presentation is designed to teach a novel and effective in-class questioning technique to accomplish two things: to increase student engagement and participation in lecture, and to allow the faculty member to use this engagement to assess learning, and therefore adjust teaching to meet the students learning needs.


The Use of Group Peer Review to Facilitate Active Learning and Foster Student Engagement

Tammy Haley, Appalachian State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

A growing body of evidence supports that feedback is central for the improvement of student learning. The provision of faculty generated formative feedback for writing can be a time-intensive endeavor. While the role of faculty feedback remains important, research demonstrates that integrating peer-review may improve writing ability, increase academic self-confidence for writing, and increase engagement in the writing process among undergraduate students. Meaningful integration of peer-review at multiple points in the writing process can provide learning gains for both writers and reviewers. A structured format and clear guidelines for peer review can help to demystify the process. Using collaborative writing platforms to provide feedback and allow for revision of writing assignments can facilitate peer-review and have been well received in a variety of course delivery models.

Technology Tools for Teaching

Adding Mobile Learning to Your Pedagogy to Increase Engagement

Sarah Nichter, University of the Cumberlands
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Are your teaching methods making the most of the rise of mobile learning? This session will invite participants to learn about mobile learning to increase their mobile learning teaching skills. A growing number of students in online, hybrid, and fully in-person courses are using their mobile devices as educational tools to benefit their learning, whether their courses support it or not. This session will detail strategies to support mobile learning for engagement in your classes. Participants will be able to engage in some mobile learning activities and will learn course design, lesson design, and course policy strategies to support mobile learning in their online, virtual, and in-person classes.


Active Learning in the Online Classroom: Building your Innovative Online Teaching Toolbox

Natasha Nurse-Clarke, Lehman College, City University of New York
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Are you an instructor looking to engage your students in the online classroom? Come join this session to learn a variety of sample teaching strategies that can be used to enhance active learning in online environments. You’ll learn how to create engaging course content using innovative tools and techniques that are sure to keep your students engaged throughout the entire semester.


Building Community: Developing Inclusive XR Environments

Dawn Armfield, Minnesota State University, Mankato and Shadow Armfield, Northern Arizona University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Teachers must no longer choose between the digital and the physical; we can now design learning to be experienced in synchronization with the environment and events occurring both inside and outside of school walls. Extended reality (XR) provides new learning spaces, which in turn pushes learners and instructors to examine critical, real-world issues aligning to course content and standards. Research shows that learners who use technology to engage with others and environments have increased knowledge, skill acquisitions, and positive perceptions of learning compared with those in non-interactive environments. We will address how the use of technology should include understanding what social responsibilities are involved when engaging those technologies. Participants engage in conversations that address how XR can be implemented to promote inclusive and accessible learning.


Mixed Reality Simulations: Applying Theory to Practice with Graduate Students

S. Kiersten Ferguson and Jennifer Culver, Southern Methodist University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Mixed reality simulations (MRS) provide students with a safe space to apply theory to practice within the classroom setting. As a pedagogical tool, MRS allows students to experiment with the implementation of new strategies or the ability to hone existing skills. This session will introduce the simulation technology and provide an overview of the findings from a multi-year qualitative research study from online and face to face classes. Then, participants will have the opportunity to “meet” an avatar used in an advising simulation with higher education/student affairs graduate students. Through a choose your own adventure mock sim, participants will actively engage with one of the college roommate avatars to see how theory is applied to practice. At the end, participants will be guided through a structured reflection on how the technology could be utilized in their fields of study.


Using An Interactive Tutorial to Teach Students How to Read a Scientific Article

Madeline Ruggiero, Queensborough Community College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

An interactive tutorial can be defined as the “ability of a student to do tasks, answer questions, or receive feedback during the course of a tutorial” as opposed to video tutorials or screencasts, which do not include interactive elements (Watts, 2018, p. 50). The interactive tutorial format achieves Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles through multiple means of engagement and representation. The literature points to UDL principles for best practices in online interactive tutorial development. Interactive tutorials can be chunked and made available throughout the teaching period, in contrast with passive video tutorials. Participants will be introduced to the user-friendly LibWizard tutorial and its ability to engage students of various learning abilities by offering autonomy, options, and immediate formative assessment.


Collaborative Technology Tools: Promoting Conversation and Deeper Understanding

Eleni Caldwell, Wake Forest University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Participants will leave with easy-to-learn tech tools that they can effectively implement in their classrooms. Whether faculty are in a remote, hybrid, or in-person setting, they will master how to meet learning goals with technology integrated into activities. Promoting a risk-friendly environment for student communication leads to open conversations and higher participation rates. Tools explored focus on piquing student interest while providing many and varied avenues for creating and demonstrating understanding of content. Brief overviews of tools include, but are not limited to, Stormboard, Mentimeter, Padlet, and Jamboard and Autodraw through Google applications.


From Digital Distraction to Digital Direction: Using Web Mixes in the 1:1 Classroom Setting

Sarah Bryans-Bongey, University of Northern Iowa
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

1:1 laptops are an increasingly common option. Teachers seeking to tap the power of this ubiquitous computing can promote student time on task, access to resources, and collaboration. This session will share a strategy that undergraduate education students unanimously endorsed as one that they will consider adopting in their own future teaching. Join this session to learn how the combined use of Web mixes, Google tools, and 1:1 devices can bring collaboration and engagement to your classroom or lecture hall.


Podcasting in Higher Education

Robb Beane, William Penn University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

While podcasting has become ever more present in the fabric of our lives, their use in academia is still restricted mostly to occasional assignments or suggestions. There are countless benefits to the use of asynchronous interactive educational podcasting by instructors for students and from student creation. As instructors look to develop and include podcasting in their repertoire of knowledge and skills, what does it take to create and publish podcasts for use in their courses? The base from which all podcasting use should start is course standards and pedagogy. In only 20 minutes, we will record and publish a short podcast that covers basic pedagogy, and the use of podcasting tools. Through the use of anchor.fm, I will be directing our podcast that includes the audience participation, all the way through publication.

Online Teaching and Learning

Invited Session

Recipe for Engagement: Strategies that Work

Julia Osteen, assistant director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Lipscomb University
60-Minute Session

In today’s society, connectedness and relationships are important for students’ learning experiences. Instructors may be tempted to think it is too challenging to fully engage all of their students. How can instructors maximize the power of best practices in order to whet their students’ appetites and keep them coming back for more? In this interactive session, we will peruse the student engagement buffet and sample a collection of strategies just right for cultivating your course! We will start with an “appetizer” of research foundations, move to an “entree” of best practices, and end with a sweet “dessert” application to our own courses. Participants will walk away with robust “ingredients” that can be implemented immediately to help them become Master Chefs of Student Engagement.


Creating and Implementing Multimodal Instruction at Arkansas Northeastern College

Jillian Hartley, Arkansas Northeastern College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are experienced in this topic and are ready to learn more

A multimodal approach to teaching combines the best of both face-to-face and online classes. This presentation will explore the efforts of Arkansas Northeastern College in the past academic year to create and implement multimodal courses for most of its degree programs. It will cover topics related to the compensation of faculty for additional work, and the methods used to determine how to utilize best practices from both face-to-face and online courses into one multimodal format that allows students to attend class in person, from a remote location, or asynchronously with prerecorded instructional videos. A multimodal approach to learning allows students flexibility, and it also addresses many issues related to equitable access at a time when students require convenience and enhanced support tools.


Escape the Breakout Room

Stephanie Parisi and Sarah Bogue, Emory University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Learn how two classes at Emory’s Business School and Theology School used Canvas and Zoom to “Escape the Breakout Room.” Based on the popular in-person escape room experiences, a virtual escape room asks online participants to solve a series of problems—each correct solution unlocking a clue or item to the next—all while against the clock. This gamified lesson format supports problem-solving, communication, and team building, and unlike typical escape rooms, course content was used to develop each level instead of random puzzles. In this presentation, you’ll see how we created this experience for two disparate audiences (marketing and medieval history), how we re-imagined current technologies, what we learned, what the students thought, and the interesting developments this project led to.


Inquiring Minds Want to Know: Student Engagement in Online Asynchronous Discussions

Edmund Cueva, Kimberly Gleason, and Bridget Mueller, University of Houston-Downtown
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Our students want to connect classroom knowledge to community issues and their lives. Relevancy is a key connecting theory to impactful learning. As a multi-disciplinary team, we applied the Community of Inquiry Model to interactive discussion tools in asynchronous online classes to increase student engagement and critical thinking. Utilizing Perusall and the Blackboard Learn Discussion Board in a multiple-step approach, students read course materials in a community-based approach, found current events related to the course, and discussed the connection between theory in the course and practice in the community. To provide faculty with a “one-stop shopping” experience, we developed rubrics for student evaluation. You will leave the presentation with strategies to get your students’ attention and pull them into online classroom conversations, knowledge of two interactive online discussion tools, and rubrics to evaluate the engagement and critical thinking process.


Memes, Metaphors, and Maps: Connecting Online through Visuals

Bethany Lisi and Fred Zinn, University of Massachusetts Amherst
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Colleges continue to explore and increase their online courses, many of which are offered asynchronously to maximize flexibility. With the freedom to choose when to engage in the course comes the challenge of connecting students to the content and to each other. How can instructors facilitate these connections in a text-laden online environment that students are accessing at different times of the day? This workshop will demonstrate three approaches instructors can use to using visuals in online courses to increase student-student, student-instructor, and student-content interactions, whiling modeling to faculty developers how they could facilitate a workshop on this topic. In this session, participants will: discuss three different approaches to incorporate visuals into an online course to increase social presence; practice using these approaches; and translate how to apply these approaches in their courses and at their institutions.


Six Ways to Improve Your Game as an Online Instructor

Clifford Davis, University of West Georgia
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

As more and more students enroll in online programs, their expectations concerning the quality of such programs are likely to increase. As a result, online instructors are looking for ways to better engage their online students, improve student outcomes, and build a sense of community in a virtual classroom environment. During this session, the presenter will share six research-based strategies (i.e., group work, live synchronous sessions, student choice, instructor-made videos, mastery assignments, and varied communication) that he has found to be useful and effective in his classes in an online graduate leadership program. Additionally, the participants in this interactive session will have the opportunity to share strategies that they have found to be successful in their own online classrooms.


The Use of Design Thinking in Online Course Design to Ignite Critical Thinking, Creativity and Student Engagement

Lynda Leavitt and Adam Valencic, Lindenwood University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Learn how an online graduate program created coursework utilizing the design thinking process, outcome graphics, and an instructional online course matrix, to increase student’s critical thinking, creativity and engagement. In this session attendees will have the opportunity to initiate course design using the fundamentals of design thinking, apply the online course matrix to an existing course, and ideate outcome graphics to initiate student awareness of the learning experience with course/program outcomes.


Using and Creating Virtual Escape Rooms for Formative Assessment

Andria Phillips and Kristine Pedernal, York University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Virtual escape rooms are innovative and interactive learning activities that educators can implement to help reinforce knowledge, teamwork, communication, and to assess and evaluate learning. The theoretical underpinnings for virtual escape room development and implementation will be reviewed and guidance for using free resources on the internet will be provided. Through their active participation in a virtual escape room activity, attendees will have an opportunity to reflect on how escape rooms offer a virtual space for participants to engage in active learning by finding clues and solving puzzles, foster communication and collaboration and discuss how they might use this teaching-learning strategy in their own discipline. Lessons learned from the implementation of Virtual Escape Rooms will be shared with attendees.


How Should the Needs of Part-Time Rural Learners Influence Online Instructional Design?

Melissa Wrenn and Clay Smith, East Carolina University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

We will share our problem of practice with supporting part-time rural students in a grow-your-own-model during the COVID-19 pandemic. Leveraging collaborative conversation, we identified responsive and proactive strategies to support rural students. Participants will learn how to apply research-based strategies in response to targeted needs. Participants who teach or support students in rural, part-time settings may benefit from learning strategies to support university students who are non-traditional or who may be transitioning from a community college into a four-year setting for the first time. Strategies include: collaborating with non-teaching colleagues, online instructional design, building a classroom community, and reconsidering grading practices.


Strategies to Maximize Student Engagement in Online Group Work

William Carr and Deborah Greenblatt, Medgar Evers College, City University of New York
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Behavioral, emotional, and cognitive components are critical for student engagement online, but the importance of accountability is often underappreciated. The lack of accountability frequently diminishes enthusiasm for group work among undergraduate students. This presentation builds upon evidence-based approaches that use group roles to enhance learning. From this presentation, we anticipate that you will learn how to incorporate roles in implementing group work and how to quantify accountability in group assignments. I also provide evidence from qualitative student surveys to demonstrate impacts on learning at a Predominantly Black Institution, Medgar Evers College, CUNY. Furthermore, in this presentation I will include an active learning exercise to illustrate impacts on the group experience. This approach has applications in both online and in-person teaching environments.

Teaching Specific Student Populations

Invited Session

Inquiry-Based Teaching Around Essential Questions for Deep, Transformative Learning

Patrick Canning, senior lecturer, First Year Seminar, Northern Arizona University
60-Minute Session

This session is part narrative, part toolkit for faculty looking to reimagine their courses and/or pedagogy for deeper student learning. It is a story of how small group of faculty overhauled a First Year Seminar (FYS) program to create an experience that would disrupt secondary ways of schooling, inspire curiosity, reframe writing, and make significant commitments to build transferrable critical thinking skills. This session will argue that FYS’s design and facilitation model can build a learning foundation for college success, offer a gateway for interdisciplinary General Studies programs, and speak directly to transferrable skills for a career in a way that is particularly relevant for FirstGen and minoritized students. Participants will gain direction on how to facilitate an inquiry-based first-year course; examples of activities that promote deep learning and critical thinking; and assessment data capturing course impacts.


Engaging & Effective Strategies for Teaching Literacy to Multilingual Learners (MLs)

Megan Scranton, Neumann University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Effective differentiated literacy instruction can significantly benefit Multilingual Learners (MLs). Based on the premises of Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT), the purpose of this session is to provide evidence-based engagement strategies and effective tools that can assist MLs in improving their literacy skills. Participants will be able to identify the needs of MLs, demonstrate understanding of CRT, and state at least five strategies for teaching literacy to MLs.


Incorporating Virtual International Educational Experiences and Sustainable Development in Core Courses Across the Curriculum

Marcela Hebbard, Luis Alcocer, Mirayda Torres-Avila, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; and Adriana Guerrero-Peñuelas, La Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Mexico
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Study abroad has shown to benefit students in that they gain language skills and cultural capital (Kuh 2008). However, affluent students are far more likely to afford studying abroad than working-class or first-generation college students (Stuber 2011; Cuellar 2015). Thus, this session shows the redesign of two freshman core courses (Composition and Biology) at a HSI that incorporate a virtual international educational experience component. Participants will learn how the transnational collaborations were set, how student projects were adapted in large and small size classes, what technologies were used, and the affordances and limitations of these types of virtual collaborations. Participants will be invited to develop ideas to implement in their own educational contexts.


Supporting the Non-Traditional Student in an Online Environment

Candace Florence, Colorado Technical University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

With the recent shift of many higher education institutions’ course offerings to online platforms to meet the current academic environmental needs, an emphasis on the growing trend of the student population, non-traditional students, must be met. This session highlights the non-traditional student population in the higher education sector while focusing on the challenges faced by these students within an online learning environment. The presenters highlight evidence-based interventions and resolutions to address specific learning obstacles. This session also examines the changing definitions of a non-traditional student, common academic and outreach challenges, the impact of Covid-19 on non-traditional student performance, the responsibility of faculty and administrators in non-traditional student success, and a solution-based process to address each area.


What is Culturally Responsive Communication in Teaching?

Christine Davenport and Kathleen Meckel, University of Alaska Fairbanks
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Our goal is to demonstrate appropriate engagement activities for student populations that are Indigenous, non-traditional, and/or first-generation. Bridging the gap between communication styles across generations, ethnic and cultural groups, and academic experience is foundational in building connections among students and educators. There are different communication styles and social norms depending upon cultural or regional groups.


Viewing College through Freshmen Eyes: PhotoVoice in First Year Seminar

Patricia Boatwright, Francis Marion University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

First-year college students are going through so many transitions, especially first-generation students. Photovoice is a qualitative method used in community-based participatory research to document and reflect reality. The students take pictures of college life and what is important to them. These photographs are collaboratively interpreted through discussions. At our small, diverse, public university in South Carolina, we used PhotoVoice to help our first-year education students take photographs, select the most important, and reflect upon and explore their reasons, emotions, and experiences in college. The students then put on an exhibit for other first-year seminar students, professors, and administrators.

Outside the Classroom

Advisory Board Session

Scholarship Advice for Teachers

Ken Alford, professor, Brigham Young University

Time is always in short supply. So, what can teachers realistically do to become more effective researchers and scholars? This presentation shares research, writing, and scholarship advice gleaned from outstanding professors during the past forty years. Some of their suggestions may surprise you. Come join us!


Empathy without Burnout: How to Empower Students for Success

Mary Norman and Lisa Low, Texas Tech University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Do you wonder what your students are worried about? Does the thought of asking scare you? Are you afraid that knowing more about them will be too much information? Learn why asking students can lead to more empathy on your part and more student empowerment. Using the student stressor feedback exercise, instructors can triage their students and based on a year of longitudinal data, we will present the top-5 student stressors and what you can do to help. This presentation is research based but is all about the application of radical empathy in your classroom. The best news, it doesn’t take much time, the impact on you is minimal, and creates a better connection with learners. In this presentation you will learn the questions to ask, when to ask, and how to ask. Additional empathy tactics and a list of common resources will be provided.


Let’s S.E.T. the Record Straight About Office Hours: Maximizing the Student Experience

Ashanti Foster, Prince George’s Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

In every university, office hours are standard practice, yet the frequency and reason students use them vary. With a few customized decisions, faculty members can S.E.T. the record straight about office hours as they become Student Engagement Time with intention and creativity. At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to identify reasons why and frequency of students’ access to office hours, to prepare an inviting student engagement time through questioning, exploration, and reflection.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

“I’m Not racist!” Candid Reflections on Blind Spots and Biases

Charisse Colbert and Michelle Love, Western Governors University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Participants of this session will be challenged to be brave. This candid, workshop style session involves reflecting on our personal journeys in understanding what lessons and assumptions have guided us on our path and looking at the biases and blind spots created along the way. We all have biases and blind spots, and we always will—the question is, do we recognize them and do the work to create space in those areas? How might these blind spots impact our ability to positively impact learners? Participants of this session will be able to explain how biases impact perspectives of those who are in positions to make important diversity decisions. Lastly, participants will be able to engage by reflecting on their lesson learned from an experience they personally played a role in allowed them to be impacted due to someone acknowledging or neglecting to acknowledge an existing blind spot.


A Time for Action: Empowering Trans-Spectrum College Students In 2022

Jonathan Howle, Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

This session is a call to action for higher education professionals to take meaningful action in order not to just support—but empower—trans-spectrum students in 2022. We are still in an era of “lots of talk and no action.” This session will provide some specific steps forward to empower college students at all levels. Participants will discuss implications from the latest research on Trans-Spectrum students’ experiences in colleges across the United States; identify specific strategies they can utilize to make their courses and campuses more inclusive of Trans-Spectrum Students; and will design a plan to bring Campus Pride Index to their campuses or improve their current Campus Pride Index rating.


Assessing Student Perceptions of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the Curriculum

Jennifer Ort, Western Connecticut State University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

In 2020, the United States faced many tumultuous events that put into prospective the social injustice, racial inequity, and political divide in this nation. Institutions of higher education are diligently working to address diversity, equity, and inclusivity to ensure that all students feel represented, safe, and supported across campuses. Collective action must be taken to ensure that strategies are in place to address problems and challenges perpetuated by language and cultural differences in the curriculum. Diversity in classrooms today is best served when students’ ways of knowing and thinking are incorporated into the curriculum allowing everyone to experience the lived and learned experiences of one another. This research will identify student definitions and perceptions of diversity, equity, and inclusion across the curriculum and facilitate conversation for curriculum revision.


Cultural Creativity: Diverse Ideas for Diverse Populations

Oeida Hatcher and Cynthia Ramsey, University of Lynchburg
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Enhancing our students’ creative abilities has always been at the heart of education. But the question becomes: How do we cultivate this skill in our increasingly diverse classrooms? Our classes encompass diverse populations that include cultural, individual, and group differences. Inherent and intentional cross-cultural interactions can provide dynamic learning environments where all students are acknowledged and accepted. Join me as we examine teaching strategies/resources and engage in creativity conversations that may open doors for marginalized students. Included are assessment tools that measure student learning while allowing for individuality and flexibility. Empower yourself as together we ignite student engagement and spark creativity reflective of our student’s cultural backgrounds.


Education for Freedom—A Free Online Course on Inclusive Teaching

Bryan Dewsbury and Kayon Murray-Johnson, University of Rhode Island
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

We describe here, an HHMI-funded online course called “Education for Freedom”. This course is loosely built on the Freirean notion of liberatory pedagogy which was further encapsulated in Dewsbury’s (2019) article on Deep Teaching. This course brings together dynamic pedagogical approaches infused with elements of poetry, spoken word, music, and visual art to make lively the promise and practice of inclusive teaching. In this session, we will describe the contextual development and unique approach to our online offering presents. In this session we will also model ways in which specific elements of our product can be used by faculty developers to support their colleagues in the transformation of their courses toward inclusive outcomes using the portfolio approach.


Fostering Success for Neurodiverse Students through Formative Assessment and Collaboration

Claudine Bedell, Amy Saks Pavese, Rebecca Wigglesworth, and Amy Knight, Saint Michael’s College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This session will outline a strengths-based approach to fostering success for neurodiverse learners. Variation in brain functioning within the human population is normal and needs to be treated as such. Presenters will share how they have drawn on best practices in PK-12 and higher education research, including specific assessment and collaboration strategies used to promote inclusive and rigorous learning. Participants will develop their own plan for enhancing equity at both the program and classroom level by exploring connections to theory, reflecting on practice, and participating in interactive opportunities. After this session, participants will learn how to foster relationships with neurodiverse students that promote a strengths-based approach; design formative assessments that inform instructional supports; and nurture faculty collaboration that enhances academic and social emotional learning.


Indigenous Pedagogy: Is a Decolonized Classroom Possible?

Barbara Gurr, University of Connecticut
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Following Tuck and Yang’s 2012 assertion that “decolonization is not a metaphor” I argue that “decolonizing the classroom” is impossible without attending to larger issues of displacement, land rights, and indigenous presence. Increasing calls to decolonize our syllabi, pedagogy, and reading lists serve as neoliberal palliatives that potentially neglect or even actively construct continuing settler colonialist urges. However, we mustn’t eschew efforts to decolonize where and when we can as we continue to work toward larger changes. This session offers ways to approach the classroom that begin the work of decolonization, while acknowledging the larger structural issues that continue to resist change. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of decolonization as a whole, the obstacles which prevent it in higher education, and individual ways we, as educators, can nonetheless work toward it in our classrooms and our institutions.


Navigating Difficult Racial Dialogues: Practical Framework for Potentially “Charged” Spaces

Kayon Murray-Johnson, University of Rhode Island
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Given renewed calls for racial equity and justice, shifting U.S. demographics, and a tense sociopolitical climate over the past few years, there remains a need for instructors to better understand how to engage and sustain authentic dialogues, particularly in courses that deal with race, racism, and other social justice issues. Racial dialogues are well known as inherently risky—and navigating these dialogues are made even more complex, given the rise of online and remote learning spaces. The goal of this session is to share how instructors across disciplines might explore and use practical, self-reflective tools that focus on emotive capacity (capacity that allows one to hold one’s emotions while engaging others’) as a complement to cognitive (knowledge) capacity used in engaging dialogues around race and racism in a U.S. context.


Practical Strategies for Culturally Responsive Teaching

Jill Purdy, Cedar Crest College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

In today’s college classroom, it is essential that educators utilize culturally responsive strategies. As the population of students becomes more diverse, higher education instructors must understand and implement strategies that address the needs of all students. Key takeaways for the participants in this session will be to understand what culturally responsive teaching entails and why it is necessary; explore specific culturally response strategies; and learn to look for opportunities to be more culturally responsive in the course content, instructional pedagogy, and assessments. This session’s focus is on practical application based in evidenced-based research.


Threading Equity and Diversity in Online Teacher Education Curriculum Through the Lens of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

Stephanie Thomas, Lenoir-Rhyne University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The student population is growing in its diversity, yet the teacher workforce remains majority white women. Additionally, online courses within teacher education programs nationwide are lacking in equity. As a result, novice teachers lack the ability to provide diverse learning experiences for students of color competently. Online teacher preparation programs are overall ineffective in preparing teacher candidates to understand how race impacts the classroom. Consequently, online teacher preparation programs that do not offer courses that include equity can create a teacher unable to teach in an equitable way. Students in online courses need to be confronted with issues of equity for critical reflection on their teaching practice. Essentially, putting equity at the center of online teacher preparation programs requires extreme reform. This session explores threading equity and diversity, through the lens of CRT, in online teacher preparation programs. Participants will reflect on their own practices and how they can grow in culturally relevant pedagogy; leave with an understanding of what culturally relevant teaching (CRT) is and how it can be threaded in an online platform; and gain techniques, tools, and resources on ways to incorporate culturally relevant pedagogy in online courses including leveraging community organizations to provide in person ongoing support.


Universal Design for Learning to Support Equitable Student Engagement

Tanya Pinkerton and Laura Corr, Arizona State University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

In recent years institutes of higher education have widened the admissions door to include students with an increasingly diverse set of interests, experiences, and skills. This shift necessitates college faculty possess a robust toolbox of inclusive strategies that can be applied across disciplines and contexts. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides an effective framework to support faculty in meeting the needs of all students. UDL is a conceptual framework designed to anticipate learner variation through three principles—multiple means of engagement, multiple means of representation, and multiple means of action and expression (CAST, 2018). Integral to UDL framework is an understanding that learner variation is the norm, as faculty may teach individuals who are first generation college students, English language learners, and/or may identify as having a disability. This presentation addresses how adopting a teaching philosophy that expects and embraces multiple ways of knowing and doing is key in helping all students experience success. Additionally, it explores a variety of instructional strategies guided by the UDL framework for instructors to use in participants’ own classes. There is an emphasis on strategies that can be executed through small scale refinement to current practices, allowing faculty to create a more equitable and inclusive classroom environment right away.

Teaching in the Health Sciences

Advocacy Project: Systems Level Service Learning in The Health Sciences

Sita Patel, Vicky Bouche, Brian Rawson, Kristel Nazzal, Alinne Barrera, Joyce Chu, Kristina Mendez; and Maureen O’Conner, Palo Alto University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Service learning is a pedagogical approach that strengthens engagement and social commitment. The Advocacy Project is a policy-level service-learning approach used in a clinical psychology doctoral course on mental health disparities. The project includes experiential training in how to conduct policy advocacy, partnership with a local organizations, investigation and selection of a current proposed piece of legislation, and direct face-to-face contact with a legislator to advocate the issue. Content analysis of qualitative course evaluation data suggests that students found the Advocacy Project to be “expansive…engaging…innovative…boosted confidence about the impact we can have.” This presentation will demonstrate why policy-level service learning is valuable in helping students develop a systemic perspective and skillset in health sciences.


Applying Effective Learning Science to Clinical Teaching in the Moment

Staci Saner, University of Louisville, Health Sciences Center; Russell Farmer and Gerard Rabalais, University of Louisville School of Medicine
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Health sciences faculty teach in many venues: lecture, small group, bedside, and clinic. Learning science has provided effective strategies for classroom settings, but how do faculty members incorporate these during patient care responsibilities? Using the strategies outlined in the book Small Teaching, participants will practice strategies most applicable for teaching in the moment. Topics covered include introduction of Small Teaching, introduction of a tool for participants using small teaching strategies, and role-play of strategies by presenters and participants. comes: By the end of the session, participants will be able to explain to a colleague aspects of learning science, they will brainstorm how to incorporate strategies to enhance learning during supervisory patient care, and they will be able to describe how to implement strategies at their institution.


Critical Conversations in Disability: Building Advocacy Capacity Through Classroom-Level Experiences

Keith Adamson and Ami Goulden, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

This presentation describes social work advocacy theory as it applies to the classroom. Using a narrative approach, the presenters will demonstrate how we strengthened pedagogical approaches for teaching advocacy in a graduate-level disability practice social work course by using creative group projects and collaborating with service users. In this session, a service user will attend as a co-presenter to share their experiences with teaching students and describe their experiences creating spaces for disability advocacy within post-secondary higher learning institutions. Participants will learn why service user involvement is critical to advancing an advocacy agenda when designing curricula and course content, how to engage students in thinking critically and creatively about advocacy initiatives, and how to connect advocacy learning objectives with professional ethics.


Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) for Teaching Inter-professional Practice

Ruth Supranovich, Danielle Brown and Umeka Franklin, University of Southern California
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This presentation will describe how one school expanded interprofessional social work practice geographically through collaboration with online education and nursing programs, as well as refined pedagogy and evaluation, through use of the PDSA (Plan Do Study Act) process.
Participants at this workshop will consider PDSA as a framework for guiding program implementation and expansion, assess potential best practices in interprofessional education, and identify new possibilities for expansion of interprofessional education. The workshop will engage participants in dialogue around their implementation of interprofessional education pedagogy, adaptation to the online teaching environment, and the use of PDSA and other program improvement methodologies to constantly review and improve instruction in the classroom and in experiential settings in the community.


Safe Medication Preparation Interrupted—Simulating A Highly Interruptive Clinical Environment

Carla Ferreira, Kathleen Davidson, Patricia Morgan, Lorelli Nowell, University of Calgary
and Cynthia Thomas, Ball State University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Distractions and interruptions can lead to errors that may compromise patient health and safety. A critical time to reduce distractions and interruptions is during medication preparation yet limited evidence-based teaching and learning approaches exist that address this gap in nursing education. Simulation-based learning offers nursing students an authentic and deliberate approach to develop the necessary skills needed when navigating a highly interruptive practice environment. In this session, participants will learn how nursing educators designed a simulated clinical experience where 116 students managed distractions and interruptions while preparing medication. Participants’ insight into the experience of addressing real-time distractions and interruptions will be discussed including their reflections on helpful strategies and techniques.


Service User Involvement in Social Work Education: A Virtual Experience

Keith Adamson and Ami Goulden, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

In this session, the presenters, including a service user (i.e., an individual with patient experience), will share theoretical and practical approaches for how to effectively involve service users in the co-designing and co-facilitation of clinical social work courses in a virtual setting. We will use our graduate-level disability-focused online social work course as an exemplar, whereby service users and families were involved in designing and delivering course content, facilitating virtual experiential activities (e.g., simulation), and providing direct student feedback. By the end of the session, participants will understand three practical approaches for meaningfully involving service users in virtual healthcare education, recognize critical barriers and solutions to executing virtual experiential learning activities in collaboration with service users, and observe how service users can facilitate learning modules in virtual settings in collaboration with faculty.


Tips for Providing Constructive Feedback to Students in Experiential Learning

Victoria Miller, University of Louisiana Monroe College of Pharmacy
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Feedback has been described as the cornerstone of effective clinical teaching. Students in health sciences programs often take part in some element of experiential learning for degree completion. The provision of feedback in these settings helps to reduce the gap between actual and desired performance. Feedback is considered most effective when it is constructive, provides specific information on a particular task, and builds on strengths while identifying strategies for improvement. This presentation provides tips for the delivery of effective constructive feedback in the experiential setting and discusses several feedback models that can be utilized by faculty, such as the Sandwich Method, Pendleton’s Rules, and BOOST.


Comparing Simulation Modalities to Guide Entry-level Practicum Students

Jana Goodwin, Nicole Smith, and Crystal DeVance-Wilson, University of Maryland School of Nursing
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This study examined students’ self-perception of competency and compared virtual and manikin-based simulation for assessing competency before entering a nursing practicum setting. Students self-assigned to one of three simulation groups and completed a self-assessment of competency pre- and post-simulation. Post simulation scores were higher in each category, and statistically significant in the clinical judgement (p<.05) and patient safety (p<.05) categories. A medium, positive correlation was found between self-assessment and faculty evaluation scores (r=.44). Study results indicate that virtual and manikin-based simulation are effective tools to use when assessing a students’ clinical judgement and patient safety readiness to practice. Congruence between student post-assessment and faculty evaluations supports students’ continuous improvement during the practicum experiences.


Flipping Out of Classroom Tradition—Building Learner-Centered Anatomy Courses

Elizabeth Budny-Buckley, Frostburg State University and Karen Gordes, University of Maryland Baltimore
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This mentor session will provide emerging faculty with a toolkit for how to incorporate active learning strategies into human anatomy curricula. To adequately prepare learners who will serve as future clinicians, we must shift the anatomy teaching/learning paradigm from a faculty-centered approach to a learner-centered approach to increase both student retention and depth of understanding of anatomical concepts. The use of case-based learning and flipped classroom techniques will be presented highlighting details on how to develop, implement and evaluate the impact of these learner-centered strategies within a foundational human anatomy course.


What’s Your Story: Supporting Student Growth through Service Learning

Kayla Fisher and Erin Holt, Minot State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
For attendees who who are new to this topic

First Year Experiences (FYE) or Learning Communities, are designed to support academic success and retention of incoming college freshman by focusing on student engagement. Bowen (2005) defined engagement as activities that incorporate active, experiential, multidisciplinary, and service learning. However, students require learning that goes beyond the classroom including interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, critical thinking, and the ability to reflect and bridge the gaps between the classroom and the community. During this session, participants will learn how to incorporate discipline-specific service learning into FYE programs/Learning Communities and how to capture first year allied health students’ interest and desire for self-growth, and the development of soft skills needed for professional success.

Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated

Integrating Student-As-Partner Activities for Dynamic Curricula Revitalization

Richard Stachel, Gannon University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Reliance on end-of-course evaluations to revitalize curricula and improve course material is problematic. Instructors have concerns about the reliability of the data, and response rates tend to be low and declining. This presentation provides examples of how an instructor integrates his own program and curricula as case study material within course exercises and assignments. Through these, students employ tools and techniques that allow them to interact with one another and become a partner with the instructor in curricula improvement. Key takeaways from this presentation include the following: the utilization of your own curricula as case study material, examples of tools and techniques employed to motivate students to participate in activities and collaborate with one another and detail how these are utilized as data-gathering techniques for dynamic curricula revitalization.


Effective Teaching: Reinvigorating the Higher Education Classroom

Kelly Maguire, Grand Canyon University and Amy Anderson, Gonzaga University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are experienced in this topic and ready to learn more

Educational researchers have extensively studied the qualities and behavior of effective teachers. Much of the existing research focused on students’ perspectives of quality teachers. However, there was a gap in the literature regarding how teachers, who are also students, defined effective teaching (Hu, 2020). This presentation will elaborate on a qualitative descriptive study that examined how teachers, who were also doctoral students in a teaching and learning program, defined effective teaching. Participants will leave with the three most important characteristics of effective teachers. In addition, presenters will provide tips that will help attendees to improve and invigorate their teaching.


Mentoring in Classrooms Via Efficient Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Learning

Aida Egues and Lisette Santisteban, New York City College of Technology, The City University of New York
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

This presentation addresses how efficient knowledge sharing and collaborative learning support mentoring within the classroom for both faculty and students. We will explore several mentoring models including career mentoring for improved employee career development, high-potential mentoring for leadership development, diversity mentoring for an inclusive workplace, reverse mentoring for efficient knowledge sharing, and mentoring circles for collaborative learning. We will explore how to develop cross-cultural faculty-student relationships where students, course objectives, educator and outcomes work in concert. We will demonstrate the process of how cultivating a diverse, inclusive mentoring faculty-student community that takes proud ownership of its enduring materials can be embraced by leadership and instructors across academic programs.


Mentoring to Advance Women into Leadership Roles

Penny Farley, University Canada West
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Research proves that mentoring isn’t a one size fits all proposition. Women who are effectively mentored advance into leadership roles at a faster pace than both unmentored men and poorly mentored women (Luebkemann & Clemens, 1994; Efron et al. 2012, Hobson et al. 2020). So, how should women choose mentors? How do they work effectively with mentors and how can women make sure they are doing their best to get the most out of mentoring relationships? These are some of the main points covered in this active learning session with time for questions included in the session.


Mixing It Up: A Quick Model for Delivering a Blended Course

Stephanie James, Jacksonville University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

If variety is the spice of life, re-designing a course or creating a new one from scratch is one way to re-energize one’s teaching. Many resources center on online or face-to face course design, but hybrid, or blended learning courses and programs do not receive as much attention. With an intentional design, a hybrid or blended course can fuse the best of online and on ground courses into a new whole.
This session will center on hybrid/blended learning course (re)design. Session take-ways center on how active learning and depth of knowledge frameworks can be used to determine where, and how to cover content using an example of the success model used in a course in a hybrid/blended program.
As such, the approach used to decide the specific course content to cover in the online space vs the on-ground space can be used by other professors in their respective fields.


Talk Less, Teach More

Jeremy Rentz, Trine University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Sounds too good to be true, but the one who does the work is the one who does the learning. Too often, the professor is the one doing most of the work in the classroom. But it does not have to be this way. There are many situations where we can get out of the way and let students learn through discovery, interaction, and discussion. Figuring things out on your own can be a powerful learning experience, particularly with the expert in the room to guide and correct. Setting up learning scenarios for students takes a shift in thought, from a focus on content delivery to lesson planner, activity facilitator, and provider of feedback. Fortunately, there are many great examples and strategies available to help us get out of the way, often using your original lesson plans, lectures, or slides as a guide. Practicing what we preach, be prepared to do the work during this session.


Thinking With Things: Creating an Engaging and Effective Classroom Experience

Sarah Kuhn, University of Massachusetts Lowell
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

We human beings think with our hands, our bodies, and our immediate environments, not just with the contents of our skulls. So why do we send students into the sensory deprivation chamber that is the conventional classroom, telling them to sit still, face the teacher, and take notes? By ignoring the powerful, “embodied” way in which all learners explore, think, and make meaning, this conventional approach disables rather than enables learning. This interactive, hands-on session models the theory and practice of an effective, engaging, and inexpensive “Thinking With Things” approach to classroom instruction. Participants will learn the importance of teaching the embodied learner; will brainstorm an approach to teaching a specific concept in their discipline; and will create a plan to take the next steps to developing their own hands-on curriculum modules.

For New Faculty

Alternative Teaching Methods Revisited: Lecture, Scrambled, and Flipped Learning

David Woodruff, Chamberlain University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The recent pandemic highlighted many of the misgivings of using lecture alone as a teaching strategy. However, those faculty who could integrate a variety of teaching methods remotely saw outcomes similar to or better than in-person learning. Some of these strategies include using mini lectures, flipped learning activities, and scrambled classes. In addition, faculty who know how and where to use alternative teaching methods report improved critical thinking skills in their students. Finally, alternative teaching methods improve faculty’s ability to reach at-risk students.


Finding Me, Becoming Me, and Defining Me

Melodie Rowbotham, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Faculty members are often asked to write a teaching philosophy as part of a faculty appointment, teaching portfolio, or dossier for promotion. Teaching philosophy statements are written statements about your beliefs and approaches to teaching and learning. Understanding who you are as a teacher influences the teaching and learning exchange. Reflection on who you as an educator enables you to teach authentically and helps build a learning climate that enhances student learning. Using various teaching perspective inventories, participants will explore who they are as educators and reflect on what that means and how understanding your perspective of teaching helps you become the educator you want to be. Suggestions for writing a personal teaching philosophy will be discussed and participants can begin to define who they are as educators.


Just Hired! But Do I Know How to Teach?

Patricia Becker and Rhonda Schoonover, Cardinal Stritch University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

New faculty with a depth of disciplinary knowledge may lack the theoretical and practical knowledge of teaching and learning required for designing and implementing university-level instruction. In this interactive session, participants will explore teaching philosophies, learning theories, and effective instructional design models. They will review tools and templates designed to construct a teaching philosophy, assess learner types and needs, identify course objectives, develop assessments, and plan engaging instructional materials and activities. Participants will be able to apply content from this session to reflect on, design, and/or redesign courses in a variety of disciplines.


Rubrics: A Win-Win

Kimberly Harris, Collin College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Overwhelming demands during the first few years of full-time teaching generally leave new faculty exhausted and frustrated. The excitement of a new position can cause faculty to create work for themselves that benefits no one. People use the phrase “work smarter, not harder” ubiquitously. What does that look like for new faculty? Participants will learn how to begin using their student learning outcomes (SLOs) to create robust rubrics. Rubrics, sometimes overlooked for their simplicity, make for one of the most powerful tools in the assessment arsenal. Participants will learn that when designed using the SLOs, rubrics not only provide a mechanism for feedback, but also instruction. Participants will have the opportunity to practice making rubrics using SLOs. Anyone interested in timesaving, assessment-improving strategies is welcome!


Strategies for Effective Learning Management System Course Development

Kyle Coffey, UMass Lowell
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Developing your course materials on your University’s learning management system (LMS) can be tedious and frustrating, quickly becoming a low level priority or rushed afterthought for new faculty. However, research has shown that mindful organization of a course’s online footprint using LMS increases the likelihood of student success and instructor-learner interaction, as well as helps faculty feel better prepared to handle the ups and downs of a normal semester. In this session, the presenters will draw from their experiences using LMS to teach you how to improve the organization of your course material and resources, make your students feel more welcome in class, and better communicate your expectations and timeline for the course.


The First Day: What Comes After the Syllabus?

Alexia Franzidis, UNCW
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Commonly referred to as “syllabus day”, too often the first day of class involves reading the syllabus, calling the roster, completing a generic ice-breaker activity, and either beginning course content or ending class early. Yet, the first day sets the tone for the semester and should be used to assess previous knowledge, gain students’ attention, give insight into participation expectations, and highlight the relevance of the course materials to students’ goals. This session provides novice teachers with tools on how to best prepare for, and structure, their first day. It incorporates specific strategies that can easily be integrated into any course, and techniques that stimulate a first day environment that allows students to familiarize themselves with each other, the instructor, and the content of the class, in a fun and interactive manner.

Faculty Support

Aligning Course Evaluation with Teaching Evaluation

Jennifer Reichart and Elizabeth Becker, University of North Dakota
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are experienced in this topic and ready to learn more

Rapid shifts to online instruction have necessitated multiple modes of delivery and course construction, but evaluation has not necessarily caught up yet. One distinguishable area for examination is the course evaluation process in conjunction with the teaching evaluation process. This evaluation process can become even more complicated and convoluted when subject matter experts create courses they are not teaching. This session will explore how instructional designers and faculty developers at the University of North Dakota implemented revisions to the course and faculty evaluation processes. This session will provide insight into how course creation can be aligned with course facilitation, how to equitably assess the merits of course developers versus course facilitators, and what measurement tools can be used to accomplish these goals.


Care to the C.O.R.E.: The Culture of Mentoring and Evaluations

David Betancourt, Cerritos College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

This session will focus on developing a positive culture and climate around peer mentorship and evaluations through the Collaborative Observational Reflective Experience (C.O.R.E.) Program for Teachers. The C.O.R.E. Program provides a template that has been developed to offer a non-judgmental, professional, valuable, and positive experience in a one-to-one setting.


Cultivating Adjunct Faculty Beyond Orientation

Lisette Santisteban and Aida Egues, CUNY- New York City College of Technology
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable educator career for adjunct faculty. It is incumbent upon colleges and universities to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this presentation includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for the new challenges to recruitment and retention brought about by pandemic that has led to changes in the facilitation of education.


Inspire to Learn, to Change, to Grow

Melodie Rowbotham, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
60-Minute Session
For attendees who are new to this topic

Mentors, colleagues, and department chairs can help support and encourage innovation to improve teaching and learning. Appreciative inquiry/coaching and motivational interviewing are skills that can be used to improve, change, and promote growth of educators. Barriers to change will be discussed. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a strength-based developmental approach. AI uses questioning to help faculty discover, dream, design, and deliver. Motivational interviewing (MI) can be used to encourage faculty to take ownership of their own development and decrease their resistance to change. The basis for MI is collaboration and empowerment. Both create positive relationships and environments where faculty can be encouraged to reach their potential. Participators will learn and practice AI and MI techniques they can use in working with and supporting faculty.


Meta-Instructional Design: Inward Application of ID Processes

Adam Valencic, Lindenwood University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Lindenwood University’s three instructional designers developed over 200 courses within the span of 18 months. After that initial push, time was taken to both evaluate their approach to design and plan for future growth. To do so, they applied the core ID approaches used to develop courses to redesign and redevelop their own instructional design processes. These changes have helped them improve approaches to working with SMEs, improve data collection strategies, and ultimately enhance the user experience of each of the core stakeholders: faculty, students, and their own design team. IBSTPI competencies were used as a rubric to provide a guide to onboarding new staff as well as to provide ongoing self-assessment. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to develop strategies for evaluating internal practices using the same tools they have in place for course design to(re)evaluate and (re)design their own processes.


Reenergizing Faculty and Instruction Through Course Design in Community

Cynthia Alby, Karynne Kleine, Caralyn Zehnder, Georgia College; and Julia Metzker, The Evergreen State College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

In this session, developers and instructors seeking to spark faculty joy will experience accessible strategies to re-vitalize faculty in taxing times through personal renewal. Together we will seek ways to help faculty consider course design with equity-minded approaches to support learners, while also bringing meaning and joy to their own lives. Participants will examine how well-supported course redesign in small communities helps faculty become invested members of larger institutional communities. Participants will also learn practical steps to facilitate PLCs focused on faculty joy. The presenters will share thoughtfully developed, easily implemented resources that can be tailored to varied institutions, student demographics, and faculty experience so that the facilitation can be invigorating for the facilitator as well.


Teaching Faculty How to Transform Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities

Melissa Luke and Jeffery Mangram, Syracuse University
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

Grounded in a review of the contemporary literatures related to faculty development, social justice, and race talk training, this presentation will center a series of equity, diversity, and inclusion workshops that support facilitators’ ability to conceptualize and intentionally engage students on race, ethnicity, and identity. Presenters will describe the development of the Transforming Hot Moments into Learning Opportunities workshop series and discuss its implementation with faculty at one institution. Using dynamic case examples and active participant involvement, the presenters will share emergent outcomes and discuss potential implications of this work.


The Resilient Professor: Recouping the Emotional Cost of Teaching

David Bentancourt, Cerritos College
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The resilient professor has found effective strategies to recoup the emotional costs of teaching so that they can enjoy a long career of making a difference for students while reaping the benefits that daily self-care can have on their own happiness and success. Resiliency is a characteristic that allows teachers to identify the emotional cost of teaching and targeting strategies that can be implemented to decrease and recoup the emotional cost. At the end of the session, participants will be able to identify some of the emotional costs of teaching and be aware of strategies to recoup those costs and they will have at least one cost recouping strategy written down, personalized to their own life/career balance that they plan to implement.


Transdisciplinary Approaches to Faculty Development

Jessica Tinklenberg, Claremont Colleges Center for Teaching and Learning and Jeremy Schnieder, Center for Teaching and Learning, University of La Verne
60-Minute Session
For attendees who have some experience with this topic

The traditional model of Center for Teaching work has been a single staff director or part-time faculty member on course release, often working long hours for low workshop turn-out and little recognition. The pandemic has taught us that this model is unsustainable for center staff, and cannot hope to meet the myriad other challenges centers face around educational equity and racism, faculty well-being, and assessment. Transdisciplinary approaches offer an alternative that foregrounds institutional collaboration, sustainability, and equity. In this session, two faculty developers will describe their work employing transdisciplinary approaches to teaching and learning work. Participants will leave with a better understanding of transdisciplinarity in the context of CTL work and ideas for implementing transdisciplinary approaches to institutional problems on their home campuses.