Concurrent Sessions


The Teaching Professor Annual Conference represents the best thinking on issues related to teaching and learning today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return for invited sessions with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected sessions through a rigorous blind review process. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the selected sessions and creates content in these areas.

 

INVITED SESSIONS

Transparent Teaching to Support Student Success
Tammy Barbé, Mercer University

Do you want to increase your students’ confidence in their ability to succeed in college? Would you like to receive fewer assignment questions and grade disputes next term? Using an evidence-based approach, you will learn how to transform assignments into transparent assignments and create new assignments with maximum transparency. You can implement this three-step method in any classroom regardless of course level, delivery method, or class size. Transparent assignments can increase the quality of student work and decrease the amount of time spent grading assignments. The method is simple and the return on investment is immediate and profound. Participants in this session will examine the benefits of transparency in higher education, explore the key components of transparent assignments, critique assignments for transparency, and design a transparent assignment.


Engaging Generation Z Learners: Strategies to Engage the Digital Generation
Vickie S. Cook, University of Illinois Springfield

Educators today must rethink teaching strategies to effectively reach Generation Z students. Strategies must be student-centered, lead toward community building, and engaged experiential learning activities. This session will explore learning strategies and activities using personal devices. Group discussions will engage participants in exploring the learning characteristics and preferences for classroom engagement of Generation Z students. Participants in this session will explore the learning characteristics of Generation Z students and how these are different than those of previous generations, explore and actively participate in strategies for engaging Generation Z students in the classroom, and explore biases and how to look past stereotypes to engage students in learning activities and approaches.


Gamifying Faculty Development
Scott L. Phillips, University of Alabama at Birmingham

This session demonstrates how gamification can be used to motivate faculty to participate in teacher development activities. After incorporating gaming strategies and rewards including points, badges, and passports to workshops and teacher certification programs, participation at CTL events significantly increased. Additionally, the gamified system was so popular, other university organizations partnered with the CTL to offer programming. Before gamification, the CTL offered 20 workshops each semester, and monthly event attendance averaged 25 participants. Currently over 90 workshops are offered per semester in sixteen workshop series, and average attendance is over 325 participants per month. Learn how to apply similar techniques to faculty development on your campus.


Let’s Get Active 2: Whip Around-Pass, Shifting, and Speed Dating
Shelley Cobbett, Dalhousie University

Engaging students and keeping them engaged in active learning can be challenging, especially in classes with large student enrollment numbers. Active learning strategies require students to be active participants in the learning process to enhance higher-level cognitive thinking processes such as analysis and synthesis. It is important that teachers have an array of instructional activities that involve students in doing things and thinking about what they are doing. Activities that require students to engage with each other, and with the learning material, often spark excitement in the classroom. Engagement strategies need to move beyond a focus on comprehension of concepts and into the realm of active learning, engaging students in co-learning, creation of knowledge, and critical thinking. This session facilitates active learning strategies (Whip Around-Pass, Shifting, and Speed Dating) to enable participants to experience methods of engaging students to enhance their own teaching.


Metacognition, Learning Science, Self-Directed Learners – What Does It All Mean to Me?
Maria Flores-Harris, Kaplan, Inc.

Metacognition, learning science, self-directed/self-regulated learners are all buzz words in education today. They sound good and the definitions sound even better. But what do they mean to me as a teacher in the classroom? What, if anything, should they mean to my students? In this workshop, we will explore these concepts and their importance to our ultimate goal in the classroom—learning. After attending, participants will be able to  define metacognition; explain the importance of teaching metacognition to students and how this leads to self-directed/self-regulated learners; describe best practices in learning; and discuss how the objectives of this presentation develop a culture that values learning over performance and why this culture should be our ultimate goal as teachers.


Are you Listening?: Teaching and Learning with Podcasts
Anne Song and Sarika Narinesingh, George Brown

Our session proposes that the aural experience involved in podcast-making enables students to develop social skills (e.g. appreciating diverse perspectives, suspending judgment, disagreeing agreeably, etc.) and habits of mind (e.g. independent-mindedness, open-mindedness, etc.), which are necessary to thinking critically and behaving intelligently in the face of challenging and complex problems. Podcasts are a powerful pedagogical tool to prepare your students to participate as responsible professionals in the workplace and active citizens in the larger community. Participants will learn how podcasting can foster habits of mind and social skills critical to students’ preparation for professional and civic lives and will become familiar with the technology involved in podcasting, so they can adapt it to achieve individual learning outcomes.


Game-based Elements for Motivation and Engagement
Kristin Ziska Strange, University of Arizona

For decades, game designers have studied what engages people and have created specific elements that are used to pull in players and make them come back.  How can we use these in our courses?  Do I have to completely redesign my class?  What technologies do I need to learn?  This session will give you a very high overview of gaming in higher education classrooms and will outline several ways you can use game-based elements and technologies to encourage student engagement and motivation within your course.  It will focus on quick, easy applications that will allow you to explore the idea of game-based elements without the gaming addiction or hours of learning to code. By the end of this session, you will be able to discern the difference between gamification, game-based, and gameful learning; you will be able to describe at least two low-stakes game-based methods that can be used in a course to increase engagement and motivation; and you will have a better understanding of how game-based methods can help students improve soft skills and critical thinking techniques for a better academic experience.


The “Sandwich” Approach to Online Classroom Feedback: Feedback So Good Your Students Will Gobble It Up
Katie Sprute, Crystal McCabe, and Kimber Underdown, Grand Canyon University

Instructors spend a great deal of time offering feedback to students, only to discover that feedback has not been reviewed. Why aren’t students viewing or applying feedback from instructors? Through the use of free and easy to use tech tools, instructors can ensure their students access feedback. By altering the tone and message in feedback, faculty can increase the likelihood students will access feedback on subsequent submissions as well. This session will help to bring awareness to these technologies as well as highlight ways faculty can make minor adjustments to the wording in their feedback. These adjustments will ensure faculty are promoting student growth while also recognizing achievement that will increase the outcomes of all students. In this session, participants will use new technologies to make assessment more relevant for students; identify ways to save time, while encouraging greater student engagement with assessment results; pair free technologies (app smash) to add value to online learning management systems and assessment within those systems and practice showing recognition to students who are meeting or exceeding expectations;  understand the importance of applying the “sandwich” approach as well as recognition in the online classroom, with regards to student outcomes; and make an action plan for using these free technologies (or others like them) as well as the “sandwich feedback approach” in their own classrooms.


Accreditation Readiness in Public Health: Preparation and Response
Brenda Soto, Ponce Health Sciences University

Accreditation is about quality assurance and improvement. Pursuing accreditation is important for the program and the students. From the program’s viewpoint, it provides accountability in its coursework and processes. For the students, attending an accredited program is an indication of greater likelihood of receiving quality education in their chosen field. This session provides ideas on how to get organized for a program accreditation process, from preparing for the site visit to proactive reaction afterwards, with an emphasis on how professors can plan their courses with accreditation in mind. Ultimately, this will be of impact for future performance and quality improvement. The presenter will provide templates, showing how to link competencies, course objectives, lecture objectives, class activities, and assessments. The presenter will also provide examples of rubrics/checklists to assess different areas. After this session, participants will have examples of rubrics, tools, and resources and a template of the work plan.


Learner-Centered Course Design

Democratic Strategies: Empowering Real-World Competencies through Learner-Centered Education
Eric Kyle and Harsha Sharma, Nebraska Methodist College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Democratic education (D.Ed.) approaches are learner-centered strategies that can empower instructors and students to work together to promote student responsibility for learning, critical thinking, collaboration, and motivation. By incorporating student voice into class decisions, students develop key leaderships skills that prepare them for the real-world. This session will therefore help participants to learn more about D.Ed. strategies by facilitating their democratic engagement with D.Ed. resources and processes. By the end of this session, participants will be able to: state the importance of developing students’ critical thinking, leadership, and collaboration skills; identify general strategies that can develop these competencies; and articulate how D.Ed. approaches can be used to develop these competencies.


Designing for Equity: Putting Social Belonging and Mindset Interventions into Practice
Caralyn Zehnder, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Julia Metzker, Stetson University; and Cynthia Alby, Georgia College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Many women, students of color, and first-generation students feel that they don’t belong in their classes or that one poor grade means that they’re doomed to failure. Professors can support these students’ success by using research-based social belonging and mindset interventions. Students who feel a sense of social belonging feel welcome and accepted in their classes. Mindset interventions help students develop a growth mindset where they believe that their intelligence can be increased with effort and learning. Relatively simple and easy targeted interventions can be used in any class to help all students feel that they belong and help all students feel motivated and engaged. Participants in this session will leave with specific techniques that they can apply in a range of classes as part of their inclusive teaching practices toolbox.


Preparing Students for Success in Life Outside Your Classroom
David Betancourt, Cerritos College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Teacher training is often times discipline specific. Future teachers are not taught how to support or facilitate success beyond the classroom. This session focuses on empowering faculty to teach beyond their disciplines towards student success in life. Expansive teaching practices that include the concepts associated with habits of mind, growth mind set, learning dispositions, and grit will be explored. Attendees will share philosophies on the purpose of teaching and the impact the purpose has on learning; learn and share teaching practices that expand beyond a subject area; and explore the possibility of teaching about life success through their discipline.


Teaching as Staging
Anthony Weston, Elon University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

There are thoroughly engaging possibilities for teachers well beyond the familiar “Guide on the Side”. This session will introduce a new model: a multi-centered approach in which the teacher works as an “Impresario with a Scenario.” The goal is to put students into an urgently engaging and self-unfolding situation, trusting them to carry it forward while ready and eager to join in oneself. Paradigmatic scenarios include unscripted dramas, cases and problems, role-plays, simulations, and the like, all designed so that the dynamic situation itself frames and drives most of the action that follows. Scenario-based pedagogical design is possible across a wide range of subjects and can serve an equally wide range of pedagogical goals, and the energy and engagement in such teaching can be unmatched.


The Layered Curriculum
Laurell Malone, North Carolina Central University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The Layered Curriculum is an innovation in assessment, giving students voice and choice in how they demonstrate mastery of content. It is a three-layer model of differentiated instruction that fosters complex thinking and holds students with varied learning styles, intelligences and abilities accountable for their own learning. Each layer offers a group of assignments representing a different depth of study and using a variety of skills. Students get to choose activities based upon their interests. The C layer covers basic course content, the B layer challenges students to apply concepts learned in the C layer, and the A layer requires students to use higher order thinking skills as they integrate knowledge from the C and B layers. Participants in this hands-on workshop will begin the journey to making a learner-centered curricular design where learning is more meaningful for students.


Two Engaged Learning Strategies That Turn Students into Experts
Jeff Lynn, Jeremy Dicus, and Allan Shook, Slippery Rock University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Every course has critical concepts that are essential for understanding the course. For students to own these concepts, they must think deeply and interact with them such that they make connections with their existing knowledge. Ideally, instructors would guide students to think about the concepts like an expert in the field. In this interactive session, we will detail two strategies which can achieve this goal. The first is a combination of flipped classroom and interrupted case. The second is project-based strategy, where students create a video or podcast to educate an audience on a critical concept. Attendees will participate in an interrupted case to learn first-hand how students can be guided to think like an expert in the field. Attendees will leave the session with the ability to use both techniques effectively.


Designing for Transfer of Learning
Maria Guilott and Karen Nieto, Universidad Casa Grande; Leslie Owen, St. Mary's School; Gaylynn Parker, retired from The University of Southern Mississippi
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Educators at all levels agree that the goal of education in the 21st Century is to prepare students to transfer their learning to new and different contexts. While the literature attests to the need to teach for transfer, few practical ideas are available to help teachers design for transfer. This presentation focuses on a learner-centered process initially conceptualized by Grant Wiggins. The presenters iterated, enhanced, and piloted the process in the United States and Ecuador with practitioners at all levels. Participants will leave with a practical tool which they can take back to their classroom to use immediately. The process gets at the core of designing for transfer. The design allows teachers at all instructional levels to understand the elements needed in planning for transfer with a commitment to action that promotes innovation and engagement.


How can you design a course that empowers students with well-structured opportunities for input and agency?
Katie Shrieves, University of Massachusetts - Lowell
20-Minute Mentor Session

When students have the opportunity to make meaningful choices within a course, they may feel more connected with the content, more invested in the learning community, and more motivated to work hard. Yet choice equals control, and ceding control can feel uncomfortable for professors. Choices also need to be presented effectively; faced with an infinite array of possibilities, students may be overwhelmed. In this session, you will explore practical, easy-to-implement ways to empower students through well-structured opportunities for student input and agency. Drawn from both online and traditional classes, examples include collaboratively-authored course policies and rubrics, student-chosen reading schedules and textbooks, student-directed in-class activities, and open-ended assignments.


How can test reflections improve student learning?
Laura Wheeler Poms, George Mason University
20-Minute Mentor Session

Test reflections are designed to help students engage in meta-cognition to improve how they prepare for tests, with the goal of increasing content retention. After the first test, the target learning outcomes for the test are discussed, and I note that the reflection is to help students evaluate their own preparation and performance, so they can adjust their study habits in the future. The reflection asks students how they prepared using a list of techniques. More effective learning and retention techniques are marked and the value of each is discussed. Students then review the list of concepts assessed by the test and note where they lost points. Students name two things they plan to differently to prepare for the next test. The reflection concludes by asking students to list three things that help their learning and three things that the instructor could change to improve learning.


What instructional strategies we can employ to help to build students’ metacognition and information literacy?
Sha Johnson and Kimberly Grotewold, Texas A&M University-San Antonio
20-Minute Mentor Session

How do we design courses and instructional activities so that students drive their own learning? This presentation proposes a highway metaphor for metacognition in the context of student learning and more specifically, information literacy. In instructional design, it is essential to consider the roles of students, instructors, support staff, and other resources. When first learning to drive a car, we could not jump into a driver’s seat alone and set out on a high-traffic freeway. However, to become proficient everyday drivers, we had to slowly assume all the controls and mental processes involved in driving and practice them until they became internalized habits. Relating this idea to academic learning and our role as instructors, we can self-assess our own planning processes and increase the opportunities for students to hold the keys and drive their learning.


How can my course syllabus go from boring to beautiful? Writing A Syllabus Worth Reading
Tona Hangen, Worcester State University
20-Minute Mentor Session

In this mentor session we’ll create an “Aha” moment about your syllabi, considering how to transform them from long, boring and text-laden documents to something elegant and engaging that your students will want to read. A well-crafted syllabus invites you to think more intentionally about pedagogy. It allows you to center one of the course’s most important orienting experiences around your students and their learning, not just policies and calendars. A syllabus can be both a thing of beauty and a tool to think with about our teaching.


Student Engagement

Peer-led Interactive Multiple-choice Question Sessions
Lucy Clunes and Mark Clunes, St George's University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Multiple-choice questions are the main method of assessing medical student knowledge. The ability to write a good MCQ requires deep understanding of the course content and thoughtful answering strategies. We developed a novel student-led approach for writing and presenting MCQs in a live interactive session. Medical students with a GPA of 4.0 wrote MCQs using a standardized format. The questions were reviewed by faculty for content and style. The questions were presented to students, by the students, in a 1-hour session. Survey results showed that students attending the sessions were more inclined to interact with the presenter in the peer-led sessions as compared to the faculty-led sessions; more appreciative of “challenging” questions and multidisciplinary explanations; and they found peer-led sessions less intimidating than faculty-led sessions and thus were more engaged.


The Patho Sketchbook: A Tool to Help Students Remember What They Learn
RJoanne Jones, Thompson Rivers University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The “Patho Sketchbook” is a learning strategy developed to help students attain a deeper understanding of key course concepts and was also used to help identify gaps in the students' understanding about course concepts through drawings, annotated sketches, concept maps, and other visual representations of course content. The sketchbook is based upon Retrieval Practice Theory in, which students are encouraged to reconstruction their own knowing of the course material. During this presentation I will share examples from students’ sketchbooks, will discuss lessons learned, and will share evaluative data obtained from the mandated university administered course evaluations.


Who Are You, and Why Are We Here?
Debora Dragseth and Kevin Moberg, Dickinson State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This interactive and research-based session will present three cross-disciplinary ideas for engaging students in class from the first day forward: participants will learn how two professors from different fields build classrooms as communities; participants will be shown four activities that engage students emotionally with each other, cognitively with the course topic, and behaviorally with expectations for classroom participation; and participants will see a clear positive connection between engaged faculty and engaged students throughout the semester—investing in caring relationships has been shown to be a key success factor for student achievement.


Beyond “Painting the Text”: Becoming Strategic Readers
Patricia Becker and Rhonda Schoonover, Cardinal Stritch University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Students who primarily use low-level reading strategies such as “painting the text” (a.k.a. highlighting), may have difficulty with comprehension. How can we fill students' toolboxes with more effective strategies? The purpose of this session is to explore evidence- and research-based before, during, and after reading strategies that promote active engagement with, and deep comprehension of, complex texts. At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to: identify criteria for effective strategy instruction and select and model high-level strategies suitable for a variety of course texts.


Beyond the Buzzword: Easy Active Learning Strategies to use NOW!
Jillian Gesualdi and Keri Green, Johnson & Wales University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Are you sick of hearing about using Active Learning in your classroom? Faculty have heard this overused buzzword for years, but how can they easily implement this style of teaching without spending hours prepping for every class or throwing everything they know out the door? Learn how faculty can include their favorite assignments while embracing a new engaging approach to teaching. In this hands-on session, participants will experience seven practical strategies that model an active learning classroom that stretches far beyond traditional learning. Participants will dive deeper into thinking about their role in student engagement and how they can apply the strategies in their own disciplines. By the end of the session, participants will understand what Active Learning can look like in their classrooms with simple strategies to engage their students in the learning process.


Let's Give Them Something to Talk About: Promoting Student Participation
Megwen Loveless, Tulane University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This session introduces four different techniques for getting students to talk to one another—in detail and with enthusiasm. The methods described and enacted during this session—carousel, speed dating, eyewitnessing, and taboo activities—have been highly received and can be translated into diverse classroom settings, from language courses to science and engineering as well as humanities, law, medicine, or business. Instructors will leave with four tried-and-true methods to create a learning environment that is literally buzzing with student conversation.


Putting Students in the Driver's Seat: Equipping and Empowering Students
Cathy Box, Lubbock Christian University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Students often enter college underprepared, lacking the metacognitive skills needed to regulate their own learning as they are faced with the rigors of higher education. There are easy-to-implement, practical strategies that faculty can use to equip and empower students in their own learning, putting them squarely in the driver’s seat. Proficient self-regulation by students results in deeper learning, higher achievement, and increased engagement and motivation, equipping them for success in the classroom and beyond. This session will provide concrete strategies that can be used to develop metacognitive acuity in students based around three fundamental questions: Where am I going?, Where am I now?, and How do I close the gap?.


How can board games help facilitate traditional lecture by promoting student engagement?
Michelle Ginn and David Palomino, North Florida Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Presenting the course objectives in a fun and engaging way can be a daunting task for any instructor. Providing the material in a new and motivating format is key to successful student learning. With the use of board games, students are inspired to use critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills and to identify concepts covered in the framework of the course. This presentation suggests the uses of various board games in a traditional classroom to help facilitate student engagement. Numerous board games can align will different subject areas.


How can closure activities end my lessons with a lasting impression?
Natasha Yates, St. Catherine University
20-Minute Mentor Session

You’ll take away many quick and easy closure strategies for your lessons from this session. Lectures or class meetings that just end do not leave lasting impressions as well as classes with closure. Closure or the wrap up of a lesson helps students recognize, summarize, acknowledge, and synthesize what they just learned. As education reformer John Dewey is credited for stating, “We do not learn from an experience. We learn from reflecting on an experience.” Closure strategies for a lesson are just that. Students have had an experience, and then reflect on that experience. Learn how to easily incorporate closure to your existing lessons to help students organize what they have learned in a meaningful way.


Teaching Specific Types of Students

Giving First-Generation Students the Tools They Need to Succeed
Joe Scozzafava and Debbie Cunningham, Thomas College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Do you want to increase your retention of first-generation students by more than 10%? Do you want to improve their graduation rate by 8–13%? Would you like to equip your first-generation students with the tools to manage the transition to college, tackle academic coursework, navigate campus resources, and prepare for internship and career opportunities? In this session you will discover how Thomas College’s intensive first-year EDGE program has proven effective over its nine-year history. Participants will learn how to develop and deliver compressed academic courses, improve student use of tutoring and academic coaching services, select useful workshop topics, and coordinate a pre-fall term intensive.


Universal Design for Improving Student Learning…Not Just for Deaf Students
Denise Kavin, Donna Lange, and Sam Catherine Johnston, National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

During this interactive presentation, participants will experience what it is like to be a deaf or hard-of-hearing student in a college classroom. The experience will be followed by a discussion on the challenges deaf students face and the Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) principles that could be used to improve the instruction and learning not only for the deaf student but for all students in the class. Online resources to improve existing teaching practice developed by DeafTEC an NSF National Center of Excellence will also be presented. Participants will leave the session with a “Plan for Change” listing one or two practical, easy-to-implement strategies to help improve the learning for all students.


Same Path, Different Shoes: Educational Journey for Students with Autism
Joy Shytle, Ohio University Southern and Kelly Vacca, Ohio University Lancaster
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Academic institutions are seeing students on the Autism Spectrum in greater numbers on all types of campuses. While many of these students are academically capable of completing the curriculum, they may struggle in the classroom, dorm or social environments. This session helps faculty and staff become familiar with common struggles of students with autism, resulting in smoother and more effective learning for the student, their classmates and the faculty. We will explore the diagnosis, their experience, and offer effective techniques for helping these students succeed. University faculty and staff, guidance counselors, teachers, and all personnel interacting with students with Autism would benefit from this session.


Creating Inclusive Teaching and Learning Spaces for Culturally Diverse Students
Diane Hardy and Hana Taleb Imai, Bow Valley College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This session highlights an approach to supporting the culturally-based academic learning needs of students from diverse backgrounds enrolled in community colleges. It explores intercultural concepts and shares tools and strategies for working across difference from both a teaching and learning perspective. It engages participants in an interactive, participatory exchange of ideas around culture, emphasizing the importance of worldview and its impact on teaching and learning. It explores the importance of intercultural competence in scholarship and teaching. We will share highlights from three courses we have developed to support inclusive education in college career programs, sample activities to support student and instructor intercultural learning, and promising practices in the delivery of co-curricular offerings that support inclusive teaching and learning spaces.


Learning from Men of Color: Success Strategies for At-Risk Students
Newton Miller, Ashford University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Participants will explore a study involving 1,300 men of color (MOC) successful in their higher education programs. These findings expose the strategies and three common pillars indigenous to MOC who are successful in their higher education programs. Additionally, participants will learn implications suggested by the research to support the success of at-risk populations, particularly MOC in online programs. Takeaway 1: Participants will understand the trends of strategies MOC implement to be successful in their online academic programs and compare their own practices to those suggested by the MOC in the study. Takeaway 2: Participants will evaluate opportunities for systemic changes within their departments to better serve at-risk populations, particularly of MOC enrolled at their institution based on three common pillars indigenous to that population.


Understanding, Supporting, and Empowering Adult Learners in Universities
Lorna Rourke, St. Jerome's University in the University of Waterloo and Lorraine Carter, McMaster University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

A university librarian and an administrator with extensive university teaching experience explore the realities of what it means to be an adult learner in university and what it means to work with and support adult learners, including those enrolled in online/distance education courses. Insights will be shared based on a review of relevant literature, focus groups the presenters have conducted, case studies, and participant completion of in-session activities. Adult learners, particularly those who are millennials, will be considered in their roles as undergraduate students and returning adults who balance complex lives. The challenges and responsibilities of faculty, administrators, and course designers will be considered, and suggestions given on how to support both the students and those responsible for designing and facilitating the university's courses, programs, and environment.


What is trauma informed pedagogy and why do we need it in the college classroom?
Neva Cramer, Schreiner University
20-Minute Mentor Session

This session provides the foundation information for understanding the learning environment needs of low socioeconomic status students and the changing role of the teacher in the current culturally and economically diverse college classroom. Based on the research of current educational leaders and the presenter, college professors have the potential to transform learning for high poverty students through the use of trauma informed pedagogy.


Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated

Storytelling: Connection Strategies for Educators
Dave Bricker, Ai-Miami International University of Art & Design
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Educators are tasked with conveying INFORMATION to students. By nature, this leads to a focus on processes, ingredients, and data. Storytelling strategies encourage a focus on outcomes, and storytelling is the most powerful way to engage learners of all styles. Dave Bricker's StorySailing™ model is simple and teachable. Faculty members can use it to connect more deeply with students who are distracted or overwhelmed by information. Students can apply it to projects, papers, and presentations. As soon as a student wonders, “Why am I doing this?” disengagement begins. Storytelling promotes a classroom culture of WHY? from the outset. After this session, participants will know how to connect and engage with students using the power of story, will learn to craft meaningful course outcomes that go beyond the dry, skills-based “The student will be able to _______.” form fields in the syllabus wizard, and will discover new ways to make even the driest subject matter meaningful.


Lighting Fires for Lifelong Learning: Strategies To Revitalize Your Teaching
Kelly Hester, Katelin Lisenby, Kristi Kelley, Miranda Andrus, and Dana Carroll, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

All professions require certain abilities and skills to demonstrate competence. As new information rapidly evolves, lifelong learning is essential. This session will share experiences in designing innovative activities that model and develop lifelong learning skills in internships but are adaptable to didactic coursework. Learner-centered activities are enhanced with independent practice opportunities and discussion-based faculty feedback. Self-directed, case-based active learning can improve problem solving. Modeling self-directed learning prepares students to become independent problem solvers and encourages professional development. Participants will learn strategies for developing and implementing activities with an emphasis on independent learning, professional relevance, critical thinking skills, growth in abilities and confidence, and fostering lifelong learning.


Revamp Your Review!
Tara Vanderveer, Nunavut Arctic College/Dalhousie University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Is your game show quiz getting a bit old? Learners not appreciating your cleverly-named categories? Well there is hope! To solidify concepts and understanding, learners need to engage with material in a variety of ways, and usually many times. One such occasion might be the during the exam review session that your learners inevitably ask for. In this workshop we will discuss, demonstrate and provide instructions for a variety of ways to revamp the review process to make it not only more enjoyable, but also increase its efficacy for your learners. So, while we all love Alex Trebek, it is time that he retired from your classroom and that you move forward with a toolbox (literally, there is a toolbox involved in this session) of review strategies that work. Whether reviewing information for an upcoming exam, or reviewing yesterday's lecture, it is time to revamp your review!


Building Relationships: Deploying Divergence and Cultivating Convergence for Sustained Success
Kate Felice, Cumberland County College
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more
Length: 60 Minutes

Building relationships is an inherent and critical component of effective instruction. While educators embrace this as a facet of a successful classroom, maintaining motivation can often be hindered by ever-changing student needs, administrative requirements, and institutional demands. How do we get back to what brought us here in the first place? This session will explore how to deploy divergence to use that which makes us diverse, tackling the challenges, and developing empathy and equity despite differences. It will also provide practical solutions as to how to cultivate convergence and to find exciting opportunities for inclusion and collaboration that sustain and transform.


Enlivening Lectures with Pauses: Reenergize, Refocus, Engage, and Excite
Gail Rice, Loma Linda University
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more
Length: 60 Minutes

Pausing with our students at critical teaching moments can make all of the difference between a lecture and a memorable, meaningful learning experience. This session is planned for teaching faculty who want to improve lectures to more fully engage students; to rehabilitate their lectures, not dispense with them; to provide information in manageable chunks; practical suggestions to chunk lectures to capture student attention and improve retention; to try “small changes” if cognitive science backs them up. In this session, we will identify research-based ideal characteristics of learning pauses; experience, analyze, critique, and design learning pauses; and take-home pause plans ready to insert into learning sessions.


How do I keep myself and my students engaged and excited in the learning process?
Mary Jo Hartman and Katherine Porter, Saint Martin's University
20-Minute Mentor Session

After teaching the same content and courses for multiple years, it can be easy for a professor to continue with tried and true teaching methods, even if these methods start to become stale, for both the teacher and the student. We also need to face the reality of new learning styles of our students; they have been impacted by the ease and availability of information on the Internet and they perceive they have gained skills and knowledge from this source. These two interwoven perspectives of keeping our teaching fresh and exciting while engaging the modern student present an opportunity to try new instructional strategies in the classroom. In this session two professors, math and biology, will present some new strategies they’ve used in their classroom and/or laboratory to invigorate their teaching and students’ learning.


How can I replace text heavy research course materials with Open Educational Resources and contribute to the OER movement?
Michelle Kruse-Crocker and Nicolas Pares, University of Denver
20-Minute Mentor Session

This session will illustrate the use of OER materials based our revision of a course entitled Research Practices and Applications for graduate students. Participants will learn about how to find OER materials, what the Creative Commons copyright symbols mean, and how to incorporate created materials into class and add to the body of Open Educational Resources for other faculty. Using OER allows students to save money and time by having materials at their fingertips and on-demand.


New Faculty

Best Practices for Preparing Students for the Workforce through the Integration of Practice and Theory by New Faculty
Ashley Parks, California Baptist University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

New faculty members transitioning from working as experienced professionals in business or practical settings to part-time or full-time careers in academia have a unique opportunity to relate theory to practice and bridge the gap between the classroom and professional world. Specifically, faculty members transitioning from practice to academia as well as new faculty members with some practical experience should be leveraging new teaching and assessment methods that approximate professional experiences and prepare students for practice. Multiple tools and approaches including active learning, constructivism, and adult learning approaches are available for building assignments, activities, and assessments that prompt students to practice and master competencies they will use in the workplace.


New Faculty Needs
Wanda Humphrey, Athens State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

“Is there a minority student services office on campus? Does the campus have a writing center? I get a tsunami of questions from students in my class each day. What am I doing wrong? What is the promotion process?” This is a snapshot of the life of new faculty trying to navigate the critical first year in higher education. A clear understanding of takeaway topics is needed to ensure a smooth transition to a new college campus including: culture of the campus and student population; administrative faculty support; work-life balance and boundaries; and assignments, feedback, grades, and grievances. All expectations and procedures should be clear to the faculty, and conversely, the institution must be committed to support, mentor, and develop novice faculty. This session is appropriate for new faculty and administrators.


Real-World Teaching Application of Educational Theories in Teaching
Donna Michele Ellis and Jeannie Harper, Loyola University New Orleans
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Teachers may be content experts, but they do not always have a formal background in education. In this session, we explore four education theories that are applicable to higher education students, from typical, college-age young adults, to older adults returning to school. Understanding how learners think and perceive the world helps to tailor teaching and learning more effectively, and can assist the teacher in identifying students’ needs, designing courses and choosing evaluation methods. The theories that will be explored are helpful in tailoring teaching to students’ cognitive developmental levels and applying a learner-centered approach to teaching. In order to better understand the educational theories used in this session, a variety of teaching and learning strategies will be applied.


Maximizing Student Engagement with Course Readings
Fiona Hunt, University of the Fraser Valley
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Wondering how to get maximum engagement with your course readings, and increase student learning at the same time? You’ve come to the right place! This practical and active session will introduce new faculty to four methods guaranteed to increase student engagement with your required readings. Participants will leave with instructions for all four activities, and will experience, first-hand, one or two activities during the session. The purpose of this session is to be as practical as possible and empower participants to apply your new tools immediately in your own teaching. Maximum participant engagement guaranteed!


New Kid on The Block? We've All Been There.
Bruce Kusch, LDS Business College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

As a new faculty member, armed with enthusiasm and hope, you likely arrived on campus with deep discipline expertise but scant teaching experience and the vital tools to succeed in the classroom. What are those tools and how do you access them? In this session you will have the opportunity to think about your personal philosophy as a teacher, identify resources and share with colleagues “best practices” and “best ideas” for getting this adventure off to an excellent start.


What is the “recipe” for first-year faculty member success when teaching experience is limited?
Jodi Bower, University of Louisiana at Monroe
20-Minute Mentor Session

This session will discuss the challenges, failures, and successes of a first year faculty member with little to no teaching experience. Using Louisiana Gumbo as a metaphor, I will correlate its recipe to the challenges, failures, and successes of my first academic appointment. I will also discuss how I brought industry experience into the classroom to make my first year successful. Takeaways include the importance of peer mentorship through an appreciative advising approach and the lesson that while teaching styles can be similar, every teacher provides his/her own flavor to the gumbo to enrich student experience.


Grading and Feedback that Promotes Learning

Feedback with Excellence: Written Response as Conversation
Sandy Vandercook, Leavell College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Many students see teachers as “comma cops” because of the nature of the feedback teachers write on their students' papers. When teachers approach grading from this perspective, they give students the impression that writing is a one-way process: students write, and teachers correct. A better perspective is for teachers to use written feedback as a conversation. Teachers who approach writing from an instructional/conversational model rather than from a deficit model provide comments which help students have more control over their revisions. In this session, teachers will recognize the importance of using their feedback as the basis of a conversation between writer and reader rather than between student and teacher. Once participants understand the concept of feedback as conversation, they will practice identifying the types of comments that lend themselves to this model.


Grading without Points: Getting Started with Mastery Grading
Julie Mendez, Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Standards-based grading and specifications grading are forms of mastery grading, an alternative to traditional percentage or points-based grading scales. In standards-based grading, the course grade is assigned based on how many course standards the student has mastered. In specifications grading, students are given detailed requirements (specifications) for each assignment; course grades are assigned based on how many assignments the student has completed to the specifications. Both systems give opportunities for reassessment and/or to revise and resubmit assignments. Since both systems require a list of course objectives/standards, these grading systems fit well with backward design. In this session, you will understand the relationship between backward design and mastery grading and receive resources and suggestions to implement one of these grading schemes in your course.


Best Practices for Integrating Feedback into Teaching and Scholarship
Alessandra Sarcona and Dara Dirhan, West Chester University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Providing quality feedback on students’ assignments is integral to enhancing student learning. As educators who provide feedback regularly, it is important to know how this feedback is best received by our students, and to evaluate our own preference for provision of feedback. The use of technology has broadened the feedback topic. A study was conducted in a professional skills course to evaluate students’ and instructors’ preferences for audio versus written feedback, and this data was intersected into teaching and scholarship practices. Results of this study reveal the pros and cons of each type of feedback and will advise attendees on the most effective way to provide feedback. In addition, we will discuss how faculty can evaluate feedback practices in their own courses to improve teaching and learning strategies.


Feedback IS Teaching!
Kathleen Hogan and Gretchen Jones, University of Maryland University College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

We'll start with a discussion about what “Feedback IS teaching” means, and how feedback can help students develop as learners but also help faculty improve as teachers. Giving feedback is more than providing comments on students’ work to support an assigned grade. Feedback enables a student to deepen their learning and to apply what they are learning at present to future learning. Faculty members also learn from the process of feedback, observing where learning is occurring or not, and adjusting the curriculum, instructions, or presentation of the tasks. This session looks at the components of feedback, how learning occurs from the process of feedback, and some best practices of providing feedback. We will then apply the concepts of effective feedback to examples of student papers and faculty feedback with the objective to refine our own distinct practices as faculty members.


Post Exam Reviews: Powerful Pedagogy
Maria Marconi, University of Rochester
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

There is no more anxiety-producing aspect of teaching for new and experienced faculty than reviewing results of a standardized exam with a class of students for whom test grades are paramount. Despite tension that may occur when reviewing exam questions and answers with students who believe that their answers should be accepted, a well-designed post-exam review built into the course as teaching time is a critical assessment and teaching strategy. In class exam reviews are an opportunity for students to identify and correct knowledge gaps. This also promotes metacognition by teaching students how to differentiate between correct, incorrect, and often related, concepts. This interactive presentation explores course design which integrates post-exam reviews as active classroom learning, which results in both faculty and student satisfaction and deeper student learning.


Proficiency Based Instruction: Using Formative Assessment to Prioritize Learning
Claudine Bedell and Becky Wigglesworth, Saint Michael's College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The ultimate measure of success is evidence of student learning. Effective culminating assessments target specific standards and proficiencies and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do. Formative assessment strategies promote student understanding of targeted proficiencies and prioritize practice and feedback (but not necessarily a score or grade). In this session, we will share specific proficiency-based feedback and assessment strategies and demonstrate how a shift in grading practices promotes a shift in focus. After this session, participants will understand a proficiency-based assessment system to measure growth; will understand the value of ungraded formative assessments to promote learning; and will learn specific formative assessment strategies to promote learning over time.


Reframing Feedback: Feedback Without the Hassles
Ricky Fenwick, Capella University and Rick Fenwick, Columbia Southern University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Feedback is a critical component of learning, yet many instructors experience frustration with the disconnect between feedback and learning improvement outcomes. This is an interactive presentation on a technique for giving feedback that minimizes resistance and keeps the focus on the message rather than the messenger. Participants will experientially learn the technique by watching and describing behavior in a video. The presenters will then teach the technique using participants’ feedback and provide examples for online and traditional classrooms. Participants will have an opportunity to identify problem areas and practice changing giving feedback. Some of the common applications for the technique include grading feedback on assignments, quizzes and tests, discussion forums, and performance feedback. Participants will take-away a technique for reframing feedback in their classes.


How can we use scoring rubrics for teaching, learning, and assessment of academic writing for linguistically and culturally diverse first-year undergraduate students?
Ling He, University of Illinois at Chicago
20-Minute Mentor Session

Assessment for Learning (AFL) is a classroom-based achievement assessment that aims to assess a student’s comprehension and understanding of curriculum-related skills or course content. This presentation explores the practical dimensions of assessment through scoring rubrics in teaching first-year writing to linguistically and culturally diverse learners at a U.S. university. Three phases in a unitary process of teaching, learning, and assessment are discussed, including explicit teaching writing strategies for purposes, integrating scoring rubrics into teaching content, and using grading information for the diagnostic purpose. The presentation calls for a development of classroom measures that consider linguistically and culturally diverse learners’ needs of mastery of specific writing skills and knowledge that reflect curriculum in the target language.


How can I apply social psychology principles to enhance accountability in group work?
Tamara Avant, Barton College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Students groan when told that group work is required in a course. Their fears are founded—often one group member fails to uphold their responsibilities and the remainder of the group is left to compensate for this social loafer. Social loafing occurs when people put forth less effort when working in a group than when alone. However, avoiding assigning group work to avoid social loafing does students a disservice. It is nearly impossible to avoid working with others in a professional setting. Students must learn the skills necessary to effectively work as a team, and evaluation of group performance CAN hold students individually accountable. By applying the social psychological concept of social loafing to the classroom, we can maximize students’ performance in group settings. Learning these skills now will make them more desirable and productive employees in the future.


Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)

Examining the Impact of Active Strategies on Student Achievement/Perceptions
Eric Kyle, Heather Henrichs, Sophie Feng, Harsha Sharma, Eva Lovas, Lane Sidebottom and Neel Sharma, Nebraska Methodist College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

In this session, facilitators will present the results of a grant supported research project on active teaching strategies and learning environments. This two-year study, which involves 24 sections of classes and more than 450 students, examines the impact of these strategies and environments on students’ achievements and perceptions. This study also seeks to correlate this impact with students’ self-reported backgrounds and study strategies. Participants in this session will therefore learn about the conceptualization, design, and results of this research project. The tools used to assess the impact of these strategies and environments will also be shared with participants. From the results, we will offer lessons learned and best practices related to active teaching and learning. We will also facilitate discussions among participants of what is working on other campuses.


Advancing Your Scholarly Teaching into Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Cynthia Haynes, Sara Marcketti, and Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Iowa State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

SoTL involves framing a research question related to student learning and systematically investigating it. The research methodology may include qualitative and quantitative data collection as well as direct and indirect measures. Data analysis may take multiple forms as well. Similar to disciplinary focused research, an important end goal of SoTL is to communicate research findings with members of the professional community so they in turn can build on the work and advance the practice of teaching beyond an individual classroom. The learning goal for this session is to outline a framework and provide a stepwise process to guide faculty in developing a SoTL project. Specific goals for participants include: identify a researchable question; develop a framework and protocol for data collection; and create a SoTL project timeline including completion milestones.


The Impact of a Learning Philosophy Assignment
Neil Haave, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Metacognition, thinking about your own thinking, has the potential to improve students’ learning outcomes; therefore, teaching students how to be metacognitive may be a useful tool for educators. We used a learning philosophy assignment (LP) to prompt metacognition in undergraduate science students. The LP asked students to consider what, why, and how they learn. We were interested in how the LP influenced students’ specific and general learning outcomes. We measured specific learning outcomes as midterm and final exam grades, and we measured intellectual development as a general learning outcome. Our results suggest that the LP impacts learning outcomes dependent upon how far students have progressed in their degree program. First-year students may see an improvement in intellectual development whereas second- and fourth-year students may see an improvement in exam marks.


Developing Digital Literacy Through Community Engagement
Elizabeth Truesdell and Rebecca Birch, Dominican University of California
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

It is widely accepted that students and faculty in higher education need digital fluency, not just digital literacy. This presentation describes how one department leveraged a community partnership to educate students in digital technologies. Participants will learn the model of “instructional rounds,” and how its application facilitated a community partnership with a local high school leading to students’ acquisition of digital literacy skills. The presentation will also include results of this mixed-methods study, including pre- and post-survey results and themes derived from structured observations and student reflections. Initial findings indicate students’ enhanced digital literacy skills and a reciprocally beneficial partnership with the community partner. Ultimately, students who participated in this project became leaders of professional development workshops on digital literacy.


Interactions between student preferences and test-mode effect
Janet Genz, University of West Georgia
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Performance differences have been previously reported between computer-based and paper-based testing and attributed to both user- and technology-based causes. Preliminary data collected over five years in an introductory biology course revealed little difference in overall student performance on computerized versus paper exams. A trend toward better performance on paper-based exams was hypothesized to be due to familiarity with this testing mode. This study responded to feedback indicating that students may favor either computer- or paper-based exams and feel their performance would improve if the exam format matched their preference. This study investigated whether such an interaction effect is empirically supported. Results suggest multiple factors should be considered when selecting exam mode, including not only performance but also student self-reporting of preferences.


Motivate Them With Video: A Community Of Inquiry Analysis
Kathy Archer, Grand Canyon University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Community of Inquiry Theory holds that effective student learning requires cognitive presence, teaching presence, and social presence. Teaching and social presence are particularly challenging in the online environment. Video—both synchronous and asynchronous—has emerged as a way to bridge the transactional distance. Does it work? Does video increase teaching and social presence? Does that translate into increased student motivation? This mixed method study of 716 students in a fully online university economics class found the addition of both asynchronous and synchronous video resulted in a 4 percent increase in student satisfaction with the instructor, and clear evidence of an increased bond between student and instructor. However, the study found no change in student motivation as measured by whether students took advantage of three available attempts at each homework assignment.


Teaching Content Using Information Literacy Standards and the POGIL Method
Jane Nichols, High Point University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Based on constructivist pedagogical principles, Process Oriented Guided Instructional Learning (POGIL) is structured peer-to-peer learning through small group exercises, interaction and problem solving. The POGIL process empowers students to apply their understanding to new problems (Pennino, 2006). This session will present a classroom case study that employed (POGIL) with discipline-specific Information Literacy goals to prepare students for a profession and for lifelong learning. Findings of a three-year study suggest that this model encourages collaborative learning and breaks down barriers to learning technical data.


How can we reduce academic dishonesty by understanding why students cheat?
Hollis Greenberg, Wentworth Institute of Technology
20-Minute Mentor Session

Higher education faces a growing problem—students are cheating at higher rates than ever before. Students who cheat do not learn. Students who learn do not need to cheat. Understanding why students cheat and devising strategies to change students’ morals and behaviors, will greatly impact what is learned. How much is learned will impact the quality of their work once they graduate. Past research has primarily been done to compare institutions with different academic sanctions and devise new methods to prevent or stop the cheating. This presentation aims to take a different approach by first unearthing the “why”, before focusing on the “fix.” Surveys were given directly to students to better understand the students’ point-of-view. The presentation will explore common ethical codes, students’ viewpoints on digital vs. paper-based sources, faculty behavior, gender differences, and undergraduate majors and how each play a role in academic behavior.


How do we design learning spaces that enable students to transfer what they learned in class to the outside?
Jason Lee, Nanyang Technological University
20-Minute Mentor Session

Mention a tutorial room and the idea of formal learning space with students sitting on rows of chairs facing an instructor in front while working individually comes to mind. Yet, we know that students spend a considerable amount of time studying both individually and together out of classroom time in various informal learning spaces but seldom in the classrooms. The purpose of this session is to share how we redesigned the classroom where we wanted to create a backward and forward flow between the formal and informal learning spaces. The new learning space was designed for collaboration, making student’s work visible, and encouraging faculty-student interaction. Over a span of six years, 108 classrooms were transformed which eventually lead to the building of two new learning hubs of 112 classrooms where we attempted to blur the division between formal and informal learning spaces.


2019 Teaching Professor ConferenceSupertrack: Teaching and Learning with Technology

Addressing Access, Affordability, and Teaching Through OER and Open Pedagogy
Jasmine Roberts, The Ohio State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Open educational resources (OER) are gaining popularity at universities and colleges. A growing body of evidence demonstrates the positive effects of OER on student learning and teaching (Hilton, 2016). This session provides a data-driven approach in demonstrating the effects of OER on students’ academic performance and how these resources can encourage innovative teaching practices. Participants will learn about unique opportunities and impediments to using OER in college courses. The presenter will share experiences on authoring and using an open textbook and student feedback. Participants will also learn about the impact of OER on teaching, moving the discussion beyond a cost-savings argument to demonstrating how OER can encourage more effective teaching practices such as open pedagogy and inclusive teaching.

Develop Digital Learning Modules to Facilitate Teaching/Learning
Virginia Callens Gregg, Minnesota State University Moorhead
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Finally! Use those ideas you can’t stuff into a class period. Present to myriad students without self-cloning. Make learning tangible, easily available. Use class time for in-depth learning. Do this by creating Learning Modules. Too good to be true? Well, it does takes time but it’s not difficult. Your reward: maximize teaching/learning time, reach diverse students in ways they learn, easily assess progress, and express your unique and funky self in a controlled manner. Learn to create versatile, flexible Learning Modules for single topics; a series of Learning Modules covers an entire concept. Design Learning Modules inventively and invitingly with examples, exercises, games, puzzles, videos, jokes. Adapt to students’ interests: teach math using art, using music, using economics. Update, re-use Learning Modules to guide learning as necessary. Validate progress in a way that both motivates students and reduces your evaluation time.


Engage Your Students with Virtual World Learning Simulations and Games
Kay McLennan, Tulane University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Session will focus on how to use the free (or a low cost hosted) OpenSimulator platform to create virtual world and virtual reality learning simulations and games. Attendees will be provided with an avatar to use during the session (and after the session) to login to a virtual world and tour different types of educational simulations and learning games. The session will feature how to guidance on the basics of virtual world set-up for instructional use as well as how to guidance on the creation of screen capture video clips of avatar “actors” (to bring in-world case studies out-of-world and into learning management system or LMS course sites). In addition, the session will highlight how to use a virtual machine viewer to facilitate wider student and faculty access to virtual worlds (including the integration of virtual world logins capability through an institution’s LMS).


Blogging as a Tool for Learning the Research Process
Daniel Kotzin, Medaille College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

It is challenging to teach the disciplinary tools for research in a way that focuses on process. In this interactive session, explore how a class blog can address this challenge by providing a mechanism for enhancing students’ learning experience when it comes to conducting research. By sharing the approaches implemented in two different history courses, this session provides effective models for creating a class blog where students blog about their research using online digital resources throughout the semester and receive regular feedback from both the instructor and their classmates. The overall goal is to demonstrate how the tool of a blog can engage students in research as a process and enable them to receive continuous feedback in that process, and how participants can incorporate a blog into their own classes.


Student Response Systems: A Hands-on Exploration and Tutorial
Cassy Cozine, Coe College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Instructors report that a major challenge to adopting any new pedagogical tool in the classroom is the training required for effective implementation. In this workshop participants will get hands on experience on how to use four, free student response systems (SRS). Best practices regarding effective implementation of SRS, as well as strategies for using SRS to decrease student anxiety and enhance group work will also be discussed. The workshop will actively demonstrate SRS so that participants gain experience from the respondent/student perspective. Participants will also work in groups to develop a short assessment using one of the SRS demonstrated during the presentation to gain experience from the delivery/instructor perspective. The goal is to provide participants with active engagement with and direct use of SRS so they may more comfortably integrate them in their own classrooms.


Teaching Peer Review and Just Culture Using Simulation
Linda Cole, Tia Andrighetti, Ally Williams, and Eileen Thrower, Frontier Nursing University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Quality improvement and peer review are critical concepts across many disciplines but are difficult to teach and learn. Simulated experiences can be used to teach the mechanics of examining evidence-based practice and the communication of findings to peers. This session will highlight a simulation assignment useful for educating students in peer review and quality improvement. This simulation is applicable for educating students in any discipline that has quality improvement and peer review as core competencies. A method of creating a peer review assignment focusing on the importance of creating a just culture will be demonstrated. Attendees will have access to a framework for developing innovative peer review simulation assignments useful across multiple disciplines. Participants will leave the presentation with peer review ideas pertinent to their courses.


The Flipped Classroom: understanding the pedagogy, efficacy & student perceptions
Beth Counselman-Carpenter, Southern Connecticut State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The flipped classroom is rapidly growing in popularity as an interactive method to promote student’s active learning and improve student engagement. This session will discuss a two-year longitudinal exploratory study that utilized the flipped classroom to deliver advanced clinical practice curriculum to Masters of Social Work students. Participants will be able identify, define and analyze the benefits, challenges and best practices of using the flipped classroom, view examples of technologically-based final projects designed to break out barriers to clinical service provision including a behavioral modification app, a bilingual blog, an expressive arts resource website and a YouTube channel, and learn strategies to replicate this course and a variety of techniques to evaluate students’ learning outcomes when using flipped classroom.


Using Virtual Reality to Engage Higher Education Learners
Rebecca Smith, University of Portland
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This session explores how virtual reality can be used in the higher education classroom to engage students and deepen their learning. Participants will engage in hands-on practice with Google headsets, where they will be immersed in an international field trip to enhance learning and build empathy. Participants will experience virtual reality technologies first as students and will then transfer this knowledge to applied learning in developing a lesson plan for their own classrooms. The presenter will share data from a pilot project conducted with VR at a small liberal arts college in the Pacific Northwest as well as findings from the literature on the impact of VR on student learning. The goal of this interactive session is to improve user confidence and application in the use of VR as an instructional learning tool.


Interactive Learning—Enhancing the Online Experience
Amanda Bylczynski, Edison State Community College
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

When students hear “online class,” they typically think of discussion boards, journals, and tests. While learning and interacting with others, many do not connect to the material in a meaningful way. When the words games, simulations, and interactives are added in, the student learning experience is transformed. With the new generation so heavily focused on technology, the online classroom must adapt to meet new levels of learning. Focus will include learning how to find the materials, how to use them as part of the classroom, and how they can improve the classroom whether online or hybrid.


Building Community in the Online Classroom
Tami Micsky, Mercyhurst University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Higher education continues to face an increased use of distance education course delivery. To remain current, educators must learn techniques and pedagogical approaches that complement the online environment and encourage the creation of vibrant communities of learning. Educators can find value in the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework as a format for distance course design and evaluation. This interactive presentation engages attendees in deliberations relevant to the value of building community within the online classroom and utilizes three major concepts: teaching presence, cognitive presence, and social presence. Participants will gain an understanding of the three elements of the CoI, will have the opportunity to offer insights about creating a sense of community, and share personal experiences with community the online classroom. Participants will create a plan for encouraging a community of inquiry in their classrooms.


Student Engagement in the Online Learning Environment
Dixie Abernathy, Queens University of Charlotte
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This session provides a background review of the most recent literature related to engagement needs of the online student and the online strategies that may be most effective in an asynchronous online classroom environment. Participant takeaways include: a richer understanding of the literature base on this topic and the learning needs of the online graduate student as they relate to engagement; knowledge of how one university with a thriving online Master of Arts program applies current research in this area to an online graduate program; and application of this material, as participants discuss how to effectively evaluate student engagement in their own online programs and how to implement effective strategies aimed at higher student engagement.


Supporting the Success of Online Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Beth Counselman-Carpenter, Southern Connecticut State University and Matthea Marquart, Columbia University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This session will help participants examine their practices of inclusion in the online classroom from the development of course assignments to the delivery of information in the teaching space. Participants in this workshop will: learn the key components to success in teaching Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students in the online classroom; identify strategies for inclusive lesson planning and instructional design; and evaluate their own classroom settings and institutional learning environment for optimal support for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students.


A Mobile Technology Tool to Foster Interpersonal Communication Skill Development
Eileen Grodziak and Alexandria Kile, The Pennsylvania State University - Lehigh Valley Campus
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Let’s face it—communication today is facilitated by technology! Technology enables speed and efficiency, but there are consequences for our students, particularly with face-to-face communication skills. Students often perceive that they are more competent face-to-face communicators than they are. In this session, attendees will examine the state of undergraduate students’ interpersonal communication skills. They will also be introduced to a short learning experience to foster these skills based on Fink’s Holistic Active Learning Model. This module can be incorporated in a variety of disciplines. Lastly, attendees will create a simple reflection entry using a free mobile publishing tool, Adobe Spark.


Grading Made Easy with Technology
Ahmad Fayed, Southeastern Louisiana University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Grading is essential part of assessment that is historically known to be a time and effort consuming process. It also needs more attention so that it can be done consistently, accurately, provide a significant and timely feedback, leads to a meaningful analysis of weakness and strength of student understanding. With the emerging Artificial Intelligence (AI) assisted grading technologies, such as Gradescope, used by University of California Berkeley, all these aspects can, to a great extent, be managed successfully. Participants will learn about AI-assisted grading tools, practice using some of these tools during the presentation, and get tips in effectively using such tools.


Make Technology Work for You: Engage Learners with Purposeful Alignment
Denise Harshbarger and Christine Gaynor-Patterson Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University WorldWide
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Technology supports meaningful learning when objectives and technology are purposefully aligned. Identifying and implementing the appropriate technology tool is critical to the success of the learning experience. This session teaches participants how to develop a lesson that is aligned with outcomes and directly impacts student achievement. Participants will engage in a hands-on activity immersing them in the process of creating a lesson from alignment to tech tool selection. Participants will leave the session knowing how to design an outcome aligned lesson and select an appropriate technology tool that will enhance the learning experience for students.


Strategic Technology Use to Promote Differentiation and Engagement
Jess Gregory, Southern Connecticut State University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Technology can enhance or detract from a course; this session integrates how technology can promote greater, more productive peer interactions, heightened engagement both in and out of class, and more accurate student self-evaluations of performance. Too often technology is touted as a panacea without pedagogical/ andragogical considerations. In order to maximize the benefits of technology, sound course and lesson design must come first. While this session lauds how technological tools have made engagement, interaction, and calibration more efficient, it includes the rationale behind the technology and the overarching theme of differentiating learning to meet the diverse needs of our learners. Specific strategies and multiple methods of implementation will be provided.


The Tale of Two Students – Video Introductions in Online Courses
Rachel Vigness; Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Hello, my name is… Students are typically asked to introduce themselves at the beginning of a course. In asynchronous online classrooms, introductions often occur in text-based discussion forums which lack audio, visual, and non-verbal cues inherent in face-to-face classrooms. This presentation examines how audio-video student exchanges can be used to improve social presence. A component of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework, social presence refers to the student’s ability to identify with a group, interact purposefully, and build interpersonal relationships. Key takeaways include: how the online classroom ecosystem drives student behavior and perceptions of student presence; how faculty can encourage social interactions and student engagement; and how reducing feelings of isolation improves retention and the overall classroom experience.


Traditional vs. Cyber CATS: Different Breeds for Different Needs
Amanda Hurlbut and Karen Dunlap, Texas Woman's University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATS), also known as formative assessment strategies, are used by the most seasoned teachers who want to ensure that students have opportunities to demonstrate their learning and receive feedback that facilitates continued growth. Traditionally, CATS have been used in higher education settings as a way to gauge student learning and mastery during/after a particular course session. But how can instructors use CATS in online and hybrid environments to gauge similar learning? This session highlights fresh updates to classic CATS strategies that can be used in traditional course settings, but also discusses how emerging technology through social media tools and synchronous technology applications can be used as formative assessment in online and hybrid settings.


Small Online Teaching Strategies that Engage Students and Improve Learning
Flower Darby, Northern Arizona University
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more
Length: 60 Minutes

Do you want practical recommendations to dramatically improve online student engagement and learning, recommendations that don't require too much of your teaching time? If so, join us to explore practical, evidence-based changes you can make in your online teaching practice, small but impactful adjustments that result in significant gains in student engagement and learning. Whether you are new or experienced online faculty, you’ll leave with brief learning activities, small course design modifications, and simple changes to your communication with online students, based on the approach outlined in James M. Lang's book, Small Teaching. In this session, you will: explore the research on effective student engagement and learning approaches and gain practical, minor techniques to apply immediately in your online teaching practice and communication with your online students.


Designing Effective Visual Aids for Engagement and Comprehension
Anne Beekman, University of Findlay
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more
Length: 60 Minutes

Current students expect sophisticated visual aids. Poorly designed presentations can have a negative effect on learning and lower perception of the instructor's knowledge. Students can be distracted by decoration, bored by bland templates, or frustrated trying to read illegible text. By applying the principles of graphic design, this presentation will demonstrate how aesthetics can engage students and contribute to comprehension of content. The speaker will show examples that can easily be implement by non-artists; constructing a balanced layout, applying readable and elegant typography, selecting colors that communicate meaning; legally obtaining and using high quality photographs, illustrations, and graphics, and adding animation, video, and audio that enhance rather than compete for attention. Technical standards and tips for optimizing your PowerPoint file will be included.


How can students use their cell phone for learning in my classes?
Shadow Armfield, Laura Blocher, and Michael Blocher, Northern Arizona University
20-Minute Mentor Session

This session demonstrates how to take advantage of students’ obsession with their cell phone to better engage them in the learning process. For example, data collection tools such as Poll Anywhere, Kahoot, or Google Forms can be utilized to gather data to: check for student understanding of content, gather opinions regarding content-related and/or contemporary issues; demonstrate problem solving; and conduct formative assessment that provides feedback to enhance your teaching practice. While using these tools to collect real-time data is powerful for teachers, it is also very powerful when these anonymous aggregated data are presented in real-time to the students as they can see how their responses compare with their peers. This session will also demonstrate how student responses can be illustrated using data analysis and presentation tools such as infographics and word cloud. (Bring and expect to use your cell phone.)


How can I use learning management system tools to increase instructor presence and student engagement in an online component of a course in any teaching modality?
Marie Guest and Sharon Brave Heart, North Florida Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Best practices stress the importance of instructor presence to student engagement and therefore student success. Establishing a strong instructor presence is possible through a combination of quality course design and effectively utilizing learning management system (LMS) tools to help manage your regular interactions with students. This presentation includes an interactive discussion on how to use the LMS to increase instructor presence through the use of various communication tools; use of conditional release options that automatically provide students with on time information and reminders; and intelligent agents that can immediately provide personalized feedback, suggestions, and encouragement. These tools are available in most major learning management systems.


How can adaptive learning increase student success in an online component of a hybrid, face-to-face or completely online course?
Sharon Brave Heart and Marie Guest, North Florida Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Advancing technologies have reshaped the landscape of education over the past few years. Traditional classroom models no longer fit into today’s technological learning environment. Increased use of online learning management systems has created a shift to an approach that uses technological learning tools to personalize learning. These adaptive learning tools address knowledge gaps by providing personalized instruction to students, increasing student success. This presentation includes an introduction to adaptive learning, discussing the background and future in higher education; a discussion on how to use adaptive learning tools to increase student success; and a demonstration of adaptive technological learning tools in a college-level accounting course. Adaptive learning tools are available in most major learning management systems and by many major publishers.


How can video conferencing techniques build learning community and preserve flexibility in online courses?
Amber Dailey-Hebert and Linda Passamaneck, Park University
20-Minute Mentor Session

A significant challenge facing online faculty is creating an engaged student learning community where learners feel meaningfully connected to their instructor and peers. Yet a ‘lack of interaction’ was the most cited cause of dissatisfaction among learners in online and hybrid courses (Cole, Shelley, and Swartz, 2014). Live videocalls can reduce this dissatisfaction. Research shows that besides improved learner motivation and final exam scores (Giesbers, Rienties, Tempelaar, Gijselaers, 2013) successfully implemented video conferencing can increase learner and faculty satisfaction (Martin, Parker, and Deale, 2012). We’ll share the most effective synchronous engagement activities you can use, our research findings about student perceptions of online course engagement, and use collaborative knowledge sharing to discuss tangible strategies to integrate video conferencing into your online courses.


How can I flip boring text-based discussion boards into interactive video response activities that engage both student and teacher?
Robb Beane, William Penn University
20-Minute Mentor Session

Flipgrid is the leading video discussion platform for millions of pre-K to PhD educators, students, and families in 180+ countries. Students record short, authentic videos and can reply to each other’s videos. Educators are 100% in control with video moderation, access controls, and much more. Students can capture widescreen videos, pause while recording, add more after reviewing, and trim to perfect. From 15 seconds to 5 minutes, your students can perfect their pitch for a book talk or present a short lesson. After this session, participants will have participated in completing a Flipgrid as a student, leave with a knowledge of using Flipgrid in the classroom, and will have participated in creating a Flipgrid as an instructor.


How can an institution redesign online faculty onboarding to provide continuity and faculty support while acclimating the faculty to the college?
Deidre Walker and Jennifer Stoker, Rasmussen College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Are you looking to develop a new approach to Online Faculty Onboarding? Rasmussen College implemented training that provides online faculty with the knowledge and support to provide a high-quality learning experience. We will discuss how we revamped our faculty onboarding process. We worked to provide continuity and connectedness by having the same Dean work with faculty from their interview through at least their 1st quarter. Also, we developed “Information Bursts,” which are short visual aids that we send out to provide reminders of tasks and processes. Lastly, we developed an organization to provide further resources, best practices, and examples of exemplary live sessions. These changes have resulted in better working relationships and a higher level of confidence in our instructors (79% felt prepared to teach their first course, and 100% felt prepared to teach their second course).


2019 Teaching Professor ConferenceSupertrack: Faculty Development

Activating a Teaching-Learning Philosophy: Articulating, Implementing, Evaluating, and Sustaining
Larry W. Owens, Western Kentucky University; Erlene Grise-Owens, The Wellness Group ETC; and J. Jay Miller, University of Kentucky
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

This presentation describes how to develop a comprehensive teaching-learning philosophy from articulation through implementation to evaluation—and, then how to sustain a meaningful philosophy. Using literature and teaching-learning experiences, we describe a structured framework with pragmatic steps for using a teaching philosophy to inform, engage, and evaluate teaching-learning. Participants begin to apply these steps through interactive exercises. We discuss how an activated teaching philosophy can be used to maintain accountable, relevant, and meaningful teaching-learning across a career. We describe practical uses of an activated philosophy in promotion and tenure processes.


Changing the Way Faculty Teach: One Chat at a Time
Claire Lamonica, Illinois State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Whether you’re a faculty developer hoping to make a lasting impact on the instructional practices of faculty members or a faculty member hoping to gain insight into how students are responding to instruction in a particular course, this session is for you. At our teaching center we’ve found Midterm Chats (our local name for Small Group Instructional Diagnoses) to be a useful tool for helping faculty identify and address teaching challenges in a particular course and make long-term changes that support their ongoing development as educators. In this session we will briefly share recent research findings that support this claim, but—more importantly—we will engage participants in a Mid-Conference Chat focused on this year’s Teaching Professor Conference. You’ll leave with both the ability to conduct your own Midterm Chat(s) and an evidence-based rationale for doing so.


Mindfulness 101: A Step to Preventing Faculty Burnout
MaryKay Maley, Drexel University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Stress is a known entity of life. Careers such as health personnel, ministers, and faculty often operate at higher levels of stress, often creating a phenomenon known as compassion fatigue. Mindfulness is an evidenced-based, cost-effective intervention that can be utilized to reduce stress/compassion fatigue and their associated stress-related illnesses; therefore, improving the health of faculty. This presentation intends to bring about basic knowledge of mindfulness and how it can be incorporated in educational institutions as a stress reduction modality. It defines what mindfulness is, its use, and how mindfulness was implemented with a group of lower-elementary faculty in an urban-setting to help reduce stress/compassion fatigue and attrition rate. Also, listeners will be introduced to some beginning mindfulness exercises to help reduce the stress that we all face.


Grow your own Instructional Designers
Jeanne Samuel, Amanda Rosenzweig, Delgado Community College; and Missy LaCour, Louisiana Community College & Technical System
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Your courses are only as good as their design. Come hear the motivation behind one Community College & Technical System’s decision to develop faculty to be instructional designers. The course employs select learning theories and design models that support learner-centered course design. Course participants use visual tools to create a course blueprint to engage students, encourage learner repetition and practice, and promote teacher feedback. The grow your own program is a crash course for faculty in course design centered around the learner, not the content. The instructional design course was developed using a multimodal approach: build it once and deploy as multiple delivery modes.


New Faculty Academies: Characteristics, Best Practices, and Lessons Learned
Susan Hill, University of Northern Iowa
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

There are numerous books and articles about new faculty success, yet there is scant research about the role of the cohort-base New Faculty Academy programs in that success. Numerous colleges and universities offer versions of a New Faculty Academy to assist new hires as they adjust to faculty positions. An analysis of the characteristics of such programs shows that they vary by format, eligibility of faculty, topics addressed, and forms of institutional support. After a brief exploration of the similarities and differences of over 30 of these programs, the presenter will share research on, and lessons learned as the facilitator of, a unique, semester-long New Faculty Colloquium. Together, we will explore the benefits and challenges of these programs and work together to develop strategies for gaining institutional support for cohort-based new faculty programs.


Teacher as Coach/Mentor: Strategies for Deep Learning Outside the Classroom
Susan Robison, Professor Destressor
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

How do you structure out-of-class learning opportunities when you meet with students to direct their research or to advise/mentor them about their class performance? This practical, interactive workshop based on the ASK model (Assess client motivation, Set a collaborative agenda, Keep success continuous) will help you provide such a structure and produce the kind of deep learning our students long for. Participants will practice skills in dyads and then shape a facilitator/volunteer demonstration using of the following skills: listen deeply to client’s agenda and motivation for learning, set an agenda for coaching/mentoring sessions, and keep success on track by designing a learning plan that matches interventions to the students’ needs, preventing obstacles, problem solving about difficulties, and planning accountability including referrals to campus resources such as writing centers.


Building a Teaching-for-Learning Culture with an Instructor-Led Blog
Janine Carmichael and Amanda Le Rougetel, Red River College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

How is the teaching for learning culture at your institution? Could it use a tune up? Amanda Le Rougetel and Janine Carmichael are full-time Instructors at Red River College in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. In 2017, they launched Faculty Fridays, a weekly blog to nurture and celebrate a culture of teaching for learning at their institution. In this session, you will: explore the pivotal role of Instructors in initiating or strengthening a teaching for learning culture; complete an action plan to launch a similar blog at your institution; and leave with encouragement to commit and persist in positively influencing a teaching for learning culture at your institution.


Collaborative, Flexible Faculty Development: The Course Development Institute
Kelly Miller, Amy Mulnix, and Ana Anderson, Franklin & Marshall College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Learn how one college uses the collaborative efforts of the Faculty Center & Instructional Technology to push the faculty’s professional and course development in a new direction. The Course Development Institute is a self-paced, online, cohort-based program in which faculty both (re-)design a course using their personal goals and learn to use Canvas more effectively. While the Institute has a focus on building the course in the LMS, the faculty use the process of integrated course design (Fink, 2003) to plan and construct their content while also experiencing the course from the student perspective. Participants in this session will learn about the design and implementation of the Institute, hear about the experience from the instructional technology, faculty center, and faculty perspectives, and explore ideas for how the Institute can be adapted for use on their home campus.


Dynamic and Effective Teaching using Applied Improvisation
Paul Johnson, Augustana Faculty, University of Alberta
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The session will provide practical opportunities to apply theatrical improvisation to the university classroom—from seminar room to lecture hall. Areas of exploration will include: methods to foster connections in the classroom, leading to more effective communication; ways to ensure full involvement by the whole group, yielding a more present and direct learning experience; understanding the power of story and empathy as an ongoing approach to making the subject matter relevant and enduring. The materials and practical examples provided in the session are intended to be applicable and transferable to all disciplines and multiple styles of teaching.


Engaging New Faculty through Active Learning at New Faculty Orientation
Cerisa Reynolds and Meg Spencer, Aims Community College
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Research suggests that learner-centered educational approaches are best for our students, and faculty are often told to embrace and use learner-centered teaching to improve student success. However, it is not enough to tell our faculty to, for example, incorporate more active learning in their classes. Instead, we must model learner-centered teaching from the moment new faculty arrive on our campuses. Here, we will share some of the learner-centered methods we use during Aims Community College’s New Faculty Orientation, including group discussions, gallery walks, “speed-dating” events, and an educational escape room. Attendees will participate in their own escape room and will explore how they might best model learner-centered teaching for new faculty at their own institutions.


GROWTH: Initiating a Formalized Faculty Mentoring Program
Yojanna Cuenca-Carlino, Stacey Jones Bock, Stef Gardiner-Walsh, Allison Kroesch, Krystal Lewis-Pratl, Ashley Norton, Luminta Hartle, and Adrianne Lock, Illinois State University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Research has identified many benefits when faculty participate in professional development and mentoring opportunities. When faculty at all levels come together to learn about teaching, learn about learning, and reflect on their practices, they can identify strengths, improve their effectiveness in the classroom, and develop a strong sense of collegiality. We will share lessons learned from the GROWTH Mentoring Program, now in its second year of implementation. In this program faculty teamed up to participate in peer observations, teaching video analysis, workshops on a variety of topics in higher education, writing days, and self-reflection. Faculty reported self-awareness of teaching behaviors, idea generation for effective teaching, collegiality, and increased competency in giving and receiving feedback based on video and live observations.


Intrapersonal Communication? How You Think Affects What You Say
Virginia Callens Gregg, MN State University Moorhead
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Teachers diligently adapt to students’ academic needs. We can enhance that by adjusting our communication patterns. How we think affects our communication which affects learning. Students tolerate our ear-digging and endless ums, but the intricacies of how we instinctively, intuitively present to them, react to them, influences learning. To improve communication, we must identify our personal thought patterns. We believe we know our underlying thoughts, but not often can we check for validity by “catching ourselves in the act” of thinking, and then scrutinizing it. This session offers crazy but revealing opportunities to do so! No labels. No judgments. Just fun and pure, unadulterated internal eye-openers. Only you will know what you discover. Then you can improve! Dare to learn and move some of your unknown thought patterns into your known window to be a more open communicator.


Modeling Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Principles in Faculty Development
Bethany Lisi and Michele Vanasse, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an instructional framework that emphasizes a curriculum comprised of: goals with appropriate challenge; materials that incorporate multiple representations of content; activities that are flexible and engaging; and assessments that instructors can use to make ongoing adjustments to increase the learning of diverse students (Burgstahler, 2015). The implementation of UDL in the college classroom yields positive results, but what about UDL in faculty development programs? In this session, we will: provide an overview of the three principles of UDL; share how we incorporated the UDL principles and curriculum format to a year-long orientation for new faculty; and offer opportunities for participants to experiment applying the UDL principles to developing their own faculty development workshops.


How do I build a brave space for critical conversations in the virtual classroom?
Melissa Singh, Renee Smith-Maddox, Tyan Parker-Dominguez, and Karra Bikson, University of Southern California
20-Minute Mentor Session

In the solitary nature of distance education, fostering a supportive, inclusive, and safe learning environment where students are connected to each other, the school, and the profession becomes even more critical. Virtual students bring an array of political, religious, cultural, generational, and geographically-influenced perspectives. This diversity certainly enriches the classroom experience, but also presents some unique challenges. Our mentor session offers strategies for effectively engaging a diverse student population, creating brave spaces for critical self-reflection, and class discussion in virtual educational environments.


How do I convert my teaching portfolio into a digital teaching portfolio?
Christopher Drue and Christina Bifulco, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
20-Minute Mentor Session

Many faculty have created a teaching portfolio or have at least collected materials that form the foundations for a teaching portfolio. However, universities are increasingly asking for electronic ePortfolios that can be shared via link. In this presentation, we will cover the positives and negatives of different widely available ePortfolio options, how to structure materials and evidence to achieve the best results, tips for organizing the portfolio, hints about presenting material clearly, and tricks for including multimedia.


How can disciplinary learning communities enact meaningful programmatic change in individual program courses?
Jill Parrott, Eastern Kentucky University

Consider how the use of programmatic goals for teaching and student learning can be achieved by focusing on developing shared faculty interest through professional learning communities (PLCs) focused on shared departmental goals. While PLCs are not a new concept, most literature focuses on how they are most effective when interdisciplinary. This session will consider the benefits of disciplinary PLCs, sometimes called departmental action teams (DATs): shared disciplinary genres, shared programmatic goals, opportunities to collaborate within departments and programs, and the opportunity to make real meaningful change for students more efficiently. Participants will leave having reflected on the ways a disciplinary PLC/DAT might benefit their home institutions, departments, programs, and courses.


How can exams, activities, and course objectives align through backwards design?
Erin Malone, University of Minnesota
20-Minute Mentor Session

Backwards design is an effective way to design classes, courses and curriculum. Backwards design is essential for any field that has too much content, requires students to think and analyze versus just memorize and for new instructors not given much direction on what or how to teach. We will use the 20 minutes to develop a complete class unit for a session participant. Using backwards design, we will explore expected outcomes, develop linked objectives, design test questions and develop the class session activities and knowledge requirements. By designing from the examination backward, instructors can ensure the test is relevant and that students are ready for the test. Participants will be ready to repeat the process for their own sessions and/or be able to help others do the same.


How can I design optional professional development that faculty want to attend?
Lydia Mantis, National Louis University
20-Minute Mentor Session

“Lunch and learn” sessions are great in theory, but can be challenging to pull off successfully. We’ll share some tips and tricks (and what not to do) from our first year launching this kind of professional development series for undergraduate faculty at our university. We’ll share how we learned to pick the right topics, flip the model, engage faculty, and keep them coming back for more (spoiler alert: cookies help!)


How can educational development teams use multiple approaches to support contingent faculty?
Trudi Mason, Lethbridge College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Contingent faculty are crucial to student success at many institutions. Most give unconditionally to the profession and yet they often receive little support from the institution. Many have other jobs and/or careers and only have precious time to commit to development of their teaching practice. Engaging these instructors in meaningful professional development can be a challenge. At Lethbridge College, we have developed a flexible model for helping contingent faculty engage with the Educational Development Team to grow their practice. Discover a unique approach to faculty development that combines online programming, blended courses and bites of learning to create an accessible, effective model. These instructors have so much to give to our students, our goal is to support them in multiple ways to meet them where they are.


How can a professional learning community support faculty development and student learning?
Carrie Jarosinski and Brandon Hageman, Mid-State Technical College
20-Minute Mentor Session

Creating a professional learning community via a teaching and learning fellowship at a rural technical college supported ongoing professional development amongst post-secondary education faculty. During this year-long fellowship experience, cohort members strengthened teaching and peer mentoring skills, identified innovative classroom practices, and developed intradepartmental collegial relationships. Upon completion of the fellowship disparate areas of staff development were identified as well as interventions to address gaps including a new faculty mentorship program. Presenters bring first-hand experience in both the teaching and learning fellowship as well as the new faculty mentorship programming.


2019 Teaching Professor ConferenceSupertrack: Teaching Health Science Majors

Developing Critical Thinkers Through the Use of A.V.I.D Discussions
Maria Young, Indiana University Northwest
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

An inability to think critically has been linked to errors of judgment which lead to patient death. As online learning becomes more common and is used to supplement a limited clinical learning environment, a growing challenge is engaging students and developing critical thinkers. For schools of nursing a common essential outcome for their programs is the ability to develop critical thinkers, yet the strategy of post clinical discussions used to support that development faces growing problems. It is thought that active, varied, interesting, and open-ended discussions (A.V.I.D) have the potential to support the reflection process and increase student critical thinking.


Teaching Undergraduates Quality Improvement and Patient Safety
Musheera Anis Abdellatif and Becky Wolff, University of South Dakota
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

One of the most critical issues facing the Healthcare system is Patient Safety (PS). According to the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI), engaging all healthcare staff at all levels of the organization is crucial for implementation of strategies enhancing PS and Quality Outcomes. The health science (HSC) students at the University of South Dakota are required to take the course Patient Safety as part of their core curriculum. The challenges of working with students who have no prior experience in clinical work is overcome with the utilization of many active learning activities that enhance the learning environment. The completion of the requirements for IHI’s Basic Certificate in Quality and Safety is mandatory. In this presentation, we explore the innovation and challenges of teaching these concepts to undergraduate HSC students.


Simulation-Based Interprofessional Education Enhances Educational Interactions Across Disciplines
Robyn MacSorley, University of Mississippi Medical Center and Kim Adcock, University of Mississippi
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Interprofessional education (IPE) has become a required accreditation element for many professions and thus is increasingly being implemented as part of the core curriculum especially in healthcare institutions across the country. This being said, simulation-enhanced interprofessional education (SE-IPE) has become a vital approach for enhancing educational interactions among students across disciplines. Simulation-based activities create a more realistic environment, combine common objectives through scenario design, and allow time for group reflection and feedback to learn further from each other. Simulation-enhanced interprofessional education increases the level of student engagement, which improves knowledge retention and alterations in behaviors.


Choose Your Own Nursing Adventure
April Mackey, University of Saskatchewan
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The Choose Your Own Nursing Adventure is an experience-based dynamic interface that encourages students to make real time decisions about issues and receive immediate online feedback. This interface demonstrates innovative teaching and learning with students being given the basic concepts and tools and requiring students to move the learning and teaching forward to increase understanding of course content. It is a dynamic template designed to increase student engagement with selected course content. A demonstration of the online interface will be presented.


Evidence-Based Pyschomotor Skills Teaching and Learning
Erin Malone, University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more
Length: 60 Minutes

Motor skills learning processes are different from didactic learning processes. This session will outline how to apply the latest research in motor skills learning to optimize training materials, laboratory time and practice sessions for student proficiency and retention: videos, discussions and cases help students prepare for laboratories more effectively than texts and lectures; retrograde inhibition and sleep consolidation mean training should be restricted to one skill a day but complex skills and skill variations can be utilized to optimize laboratory hours; learners do not self-assess well and motor skills are well-retained once proficiency is obtained—hence practice should be distributed, deliberate, individualized and supervised; feedback, exercise, deep breathing and naps can all help retain the newly learned skills.


What is the feasibility of interprofessional learning in an asynchronous environment, and how can lessons learned by faculty apply to increase the success of others?
Emily Weidman-Evans, Ashley Fort, and Teresa Bigler, LSUHSC-Shreveport Physician Assistant Program
20-Minute Mentor Session

There are many examples of interdisciplinary education in which faculty from separate areas of study come together to teach students on a topic. When students are taught in this manner, they are better able to think critically, recognize bias, tolerate ambiguity, and appreciate ethical concerns. These potential outcomes are often less tangible, but highly important, goals held by faculty members. There are logistical barriers to overcome that are not specific to discipline, which will be discussed in the presentation in the context of different approaches we have tried—some of which have worked well, some of which have needed modification, and some of which are still in progress.


Can a diverse, technology-driven assessment method create a greater understanding of course material?
Candace Walker and Joanne Jones, Thompson Rivers University
20-Minute Mentor Session

Asking students to create is the highest level in Blooms Taxonomy. Using an assignment where students are required to construct original work has the potential to increase their level of understanding. The use of technology in the classroom has been used to increase student engagement, support learning, and more recently as a technique to assess students’ learning. We wanted to see if using technology was applicable to use for a take home assignment. Stop motion animation was chosen as the medium to assess whether students could take a concept learned in a pathophysiology class and demonstration their understanding. By enabling a diverse assessment method, would we see a greater understanding of the material being taught in class? Our third-year pathophysiology class on immunity was used to assess whether the student could take concepts learned in this unit and apply them. Guidelines for the students included information on how to create a stop motion video. This assignment was then evaluated at the end of the semester to obtain student feedback for potential applications.


How can an online survey tool used with undergraduate nursing students in peer to peer and team evaluation impact student learning?
Luanne Billingsley, Kristie Riddle, and Kristin Marino, Southeastern Louisiana University
20-Minute Mentor Session

The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using an online survey tool to secure undergraduate nursing student feedback in peer-to-peer and team evaluation post-debates. Debates were added to a senior level nursing course to improve verbal communication and critical thinking skills. A multi-semester analysis resulted in revised tools. Students reported that the debates helped them understand the topics better, learn new knowledge, and change attitudes. Student learning and tool revisions will be discussed.


2019 Teaching Professor ConferenceSupertrack: Teaching Professional Majors

Effective Strategies for Using Technology to Maintain Program Accountability in University Professional Preparation Programs
Margaret Noe, Southeast Missouri University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

The session includes a discussion of the use of technology to prepare candidates enrolled in a professional preparation program and to create a program accountability system. The presenter shares her experience using technology to teach education law to aspiring school leaders who are seeking certification and licensure. The presenter will demonstrate how universities can use technology to design and implement a comprehensive preparation program for professionals; assess, track and document candidate performance; and provide for a systematic evaluation process for program accreditation and accountability.


Maintain The Rigor; Reduce The Stress
Toni Weiss and Harry Cole, Tulane University
Audience: Has some experience with this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Students are going to college with high anxiety and less resiliency to cope. Limited numbers of high-stakes assessments, during a single semester, can inadvertently inhibit many students’ ability to accurately show mastery – even in well-constructed courses. In this session, we will discuss the experience of students and how anxiety impacts them when approaching coursework and assessments. We will explore alternative ways of grading, and opportunities for diversifying assessments. By the end of this session, participants will: develop an understanding of student anxiety and be able to identify components of their courses which may increase anxiety; understand the anxiety/assessment feedback loop and ways to mitigate it; and be prepared to add additional assessments into their future classes, understand their purpose and know how to do so without much additional work/grading time.


Community Partnerships Foster Professional Student Engagement, Purpose, and Growth
Melissa Becker, Lisa Colvin, Erin Pearce, and Anna Fox, Tarleton State University
Audience: Is new to this topic
Length: 60 Minutes

Developing partnerships outside the walls of the university classroom is vital to the success of university programs. Allowing students to have authentic experiences in the context of their chosen profession and also make connections with those who can mentor them is valuable. The development and maintenance of partnerships is essential to programs which strive to make professional growth meaningful. Our experiences in the development and growth of a variety of community partners has strengthened our program and provided our students with irreplaceable opportunities. Students consistently report that their feelings of confidence and professional preparation are directly linked to their high level of engagement during their clinical experiences in our partnership settings.