Concurrent Sessions


The Magna Teaching with Technology Conference represents the best thinking on issues related to teaching and learning with technology today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected presentations through a rigorous blind review process. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return as invited presenters with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the general sessions and creates content in these areas.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Multiple Realities: A Primer on Virtual/Augmented/Mixed Reality

Brandon C. Taylor, Columbia College Chicago Online

Virtual/Augmented/Mixed Reality (XR) are emerging technologies that can facilitate and enhance learning immersion, job aids, microlearning, just-in-time learning, and performance support in online, blended, and face-to-face courses. Join the session and learn how!


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Creating a Generation Z Engaged Online or Blended Classroom Experience

Vickie Cook, University of Illinois Springfield

Educators today must rethink teaching strategies to effectively reach Generation Z students. Strategies must be student-centered, lead toward community building, and include engaged learning activities. This session explores learning activities using personal devices. Participants will explore the learning characteristics and preferences for classroom engagement of Generation Z students and how these are different than those of previous generations, they will actively participate in strategies for engaging Generation Z students in the classroom, and will explore biases and how to look past stereotypes to engage students in learning activities and approaches.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Pedagogical Use of Educational Video and Resources

Nancy Evans, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

There is substantial research promoting the use of video in the classroom as a dynamic resource for supporting curricula. According to a recent teacher survey, 94% of classroom teachers have effectively used video. Video is the third item (Use of Video for Classroom and Homework) in THE Journal’s article on “10 Major Technology Trends in Education”. This session will highlight the pedagogical value of video-based learning for student engagement, and active learning as well as tips on media planning. Resources demonstrated include TedEd, Edpuzzle, H5P, and ThingLink. This session will illustrate the importance of the pedagogical value of video-based learning, summarize tips on media planning, and demonstrate the use of video resources.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Overcoming barriers: How to Increase Faculty and Staff Buy-In for Online Programs

James Moore, DePaul University

The first step in overcoming resistance to teaching online is to understand the obstacles and objections. Explore three key reasons that faculty and staff give for not wanting to make the move to online and learn about a framework that can help overcome the objections.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Communication Tools in the Online Environment—Mixing It Up

Janet Staker Woerner, University of Wisconsin - Madison

This interactive session discusses the use of a variety of communication tools that can be deployed in the online environment for maximum impact with learners. Learn about best practices in using technology-based tools and more traditional tools to connect with students.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Boost Evaluations, Enhance Learning and Minimize Cheating!

Jane Sutterlin and Emily Baxter, The Pennsylvania State University

Join us to explore practical ways to leverage technology to cultivate a classroom environment where instructor-student relationships are positive, and students are motivated to work hard and understand the relevance of the course content. Course evaluations are bound to skyrocket! Participants learn to cultivate meaningful relationships with students utilizing a variety of learning technologies; create a classroom culture that clearly demonstrates the relevance of the course material to the overarching purpose of students’ education; and implement rigorous teaching and assessment strategies that help students solidify learning.


Distance Teaching an Learning Conference TrackDistance Teaching & Learning Conference Invited Presenters

Increase Student Retention and Satisfaction with Social Presence and Media Richness

Evie Oregon, Western Kentucky University

Despite the increased number of institutions providing online learning programs, and more students choosing distance education, student retention remains one of the largest challenges in higher education. Attrition rates are 10% to 20% higher in online courses than their face-to-face counterparts. While online course formats offer convenient methods of instruction, poor course development often leads to high attrition rates. This session presents the use of online social communities and richer media technologies, specifically Media Richness Theory (MRT) and Social Presence Theory, in online course design and instruction, and how they aid overall program retention and student satisfaction. This presentation should prove to be a resource for online instructors, instructional designers, and administrators.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Advisory Board Session

Engaging Flipgrid: Three Levels of Immersion

Madeline Craig, Molloy College

Now that Flipgrid is completely free, with no premium accounts and no distinction between Flipgrid one and Flipgrid classroom, we can all use the tool in either a shallow, introductory manner or a deep, full-blown utilizing-all-the-bells-and-whistles kind of way. And those bells and whistles got even better as of the most recent update on August 1, 2018! This hands-on workshop will explain the three levels of Flipgrid immersion, and you choose the extent to which you would like to incorporate this tool into your face-to-face, hybrid or online courses. You will interpret the three levels of Flipgrid immersion in relation to your subject matter; examine the variety of available features and resources in Flipgrid to determine how to best incorporate the tool in your course(s); and practice using Flipgrid in a test grid to become more comfortable with the tool.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Advisory Board Session

Making Multimedia Work for You and Your Students

Greg Szczyrbak, Millersville University of Pennsylvania

Audio, video and other media to support learning in many subjects are easily found online. However, the media is not always designed with best pedagogical practices in mind. Thankfully, there are a variety of free, easy-to-use tools that instructors can use to “hack” media to suit the needs of their course and improve learning impact. Participants in this hands-on session will learn researched based multimedia principles and experiment with free tools to optimize learning for their own courses and disciplines. You will identify pedagogical deficiencies in multimedia found online, apply multimedia principles to improve learning, and choose free tools to modify media to match the learning objectives of your course.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Are you Listening? Teaching and Learning with Podcasts

Sarika Narinesingh and Wonyoung (Anne) Song, George Brown College

This session proposes that the aural experience involved in podcast making enables students to develop social skills (e.g. appreciating diverse perspectives, suspending one’s judgment, disagreeing agreeably, etc.) and habits of mind (e.g. independent-mindedness, open-mindedness, etc.), which are necessary to thinking critically and behaving intelligently in the face of challenging and complex problems. As a prewriting tool, podcasting allows students to create a stronger authorial voice for a listening and a reading audience. Podcasting encourages students to engage in civil discourse. And, podcasting prepares students for successful workplace communication. Learn how to adapt podcasting to meet learning outcomes across disciplines and enable students to develop social skills and intellectual habits of mind to make positive contributions in the classroom, in the community, and in the workplace.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic and Has some experience with this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Becoming a Technology Samurai: Using Digital Tools to Make Student Thinking Visible

Curby Alexander, Texas Christian University

Do we really know what our students are thinking? While it is not our responsibility to control the thoughts of our students, instructors can implement strategies that give us insight into, and even guide, the thinking of our students during instruction. Carefully framing the “thinking routines” used to guide and facilitate student thinking, paired with flexible technologies to make that thinking visible, can lead to powerful learning opportunities. This session will highlight five different strategies for infusing powerful thinking routines with visual technology tools to help instructors cultivate a culture of curiosity and open-mindedness in the classroom.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Charisma, Personality, and Intellectual Property in Online Learning

Rob Larson The College of St. Scholastica

A media studies professor shares content and considerations in developing video-based, interactive online coursework using a lightboard, which allows direct eye contact, hand gestures, conversational speaking, and the use of traditional handwriting. The demonstrated techniques lead to serious considerations about intellectual property in the online environment, and how to treat (and compensate) faculty fairly. Also discussed: ethical licensing, syndication, royalties, and the importance of continuous revision and improvement of course material for subsequent offerings of popular online courses. This session is a mix of live demonstration, video, and discussion.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

GIFs, Twitter, Docs, Oh My! Eliciting Unheard Voices with Technology

Emma Bjorngard-Basayne and Kristi Kaeppel, UConn

As instructors striving for democratic classrooms, we are concerned with the limitations of traditional classroom discussions to elicit a wide range of voices and provide equitable opportunities for students of diverse backgrounds to demonstrate their thinking and learning. We also believe that there is an opportunity to use every-day social media and technology to create more naturalistic, authentic means of communication in class. Participants will learn how to use technology (Google Docs, Twitter, memes/gifs) to facilitate engaging activities that draw out a variety of voices that may usually go unheard.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

How to Increase Student Completion Rates in Online Learning

Miebeth Bustillo-Booth, Pierce College

Thousands of higher-education courses are online, with more on their way. By some account, about one in four students are now taking at least one online course (Online Learning Consortium, 2016). While millions of students flock to take online courses in hope of a better life, completion rates are not yet admirable. Through this session, gain practical instructional design and delivery methods to increase online completion rates. Major session takeaways include: application of Quality Matters and Universal Design principles; transparent instructional delivery strategies to support student success; and sample course template with checklist.

Experience-based and Evidence-Based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic and Has some experience with this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Click to Connect: Including Synchronous Videoconferencing Sessions in Online Learning

Anne Frankel, Jamie Mansell, and Laurie Friedman, Temple University

Within the last year, Temple University’s College of Public Health (CPH) has launched three new online graduate programs. To increase student engagement, retention, and achievement of program objectives, every course within the online programs includes synchronous sessions facilitated via WebEx. This session will discuss several key lessons learned from implementation of synchronous sessions: preparing students and managing technology issues; writing scripts to guide sessions and best practices for time management; increasing and assessing student engagement in real-time; and leveraging software features like breakout rooms for group collaboration and community building.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Critical Information Processing in a Digital World: Developing Student Skills

Kimberly Chappell, Fort Hays State University

Critical information processing skills are important to learning and for navigating a technology-reliant world. Information is plentiful via the web, however much of what is available daily is unreliable, filled with bias, and frankly, false. It is no surprise that students lack the information processing skills critical to learning and succeeding in a global society. This session is designed to engage participants in critical information processing activities to learn how to develop these skills with their students. Participants will learn teaching strategies for developing critical reading skills and cultivating information analysis skills.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Emerging Technology in Higher Education: Virtual Patient Simulation

Elaine Kauschinger, Duke University School of Nursing

Due to the extensive experience of young students with gaming, there is an expectation that learning experiences provide a constant, immediate feedback. Real time interaction and feedback are core components of the virtual experience. Educators in healthcare programs have increasingly used virtual patients (computerized clinical case simulations) with the resulting in consistently higher learning outcomes in comparison with no intervention. Online courses that do not provide interactive educational activities may limit the learning opportunities for students. The use of virtual unfolding patient simulation enables students to immediately apply what they have recently learned, resulting in a deeper appreciation of content. Virtual patient simulation (VPS) is a learning platform readily available for online courses. This presentation provides an overview of the findings from a graduate nursing pilot project that used a new pedagogical approach by incorporating cloud-based, VPS learning.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic and Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Podcasting: Reaching the Adult Learner on the Move

Lynda Leavitt and Robyne Elder, Lindenwood University

Communicating with students is key to their success in higher education. With this session, participants will learn how to create and implement their own podcast. The presenters will share CapIt!, a podcast developed for doctoral students to motivate, educate, and inspire students. Each podcast includes tips, suggestions, research, guest speakers, and a chance to learn from experts in the field. Participants will leave the session knowing exactly how to record and upload their own podcast using their cell phone or tablet. The presenters will also have tips on how to promote the podcast once it is published and how to engage in a discussion format once the recording has started.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Teaching and Learning with Technology

Utilizing Online Collaborative Tools to Promote New Learning

Douglas Koch, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

In recent years, there has been a proliferation of online collaborative tools and teaching methodologies such as virtual worlds, social bookmarking, blogs, discussion boards, wikis, audience response systems, massive open online courses (MOOCs), and custom social networks. An ever-changing landscape can hamper the migration from a traditional means of teaching and learning to a more collaborative student-centered process. The resistance encountered comes in many forms and from all levels of an organization. By understanding these tools and potential barriers, educators will be better able adapt to meet the needs of our learners.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Advisory Board Session

Teaching Digital Citizenship in the Collegiate Snapchat World

Ollie Dreon, Millersville University of Pennsylvania and Julie Smith, Webster University

How do we prepare students to mindfully navigate an ever-changing technological landscape? In this session, we’ll outline how "digital citizenship" has evolved into "digital wellness" and examine how these skills can be integrated across content areas.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Invited Session

Embracing Emotional Presence in Online and Face-to-Face Learning

Flower Darby, Northern Arizona University and Kristin Ziska Strange, University of Arizona

Can emotional presence impact learning? How does gamification enhance emotional presence? And how can streaming media, audio fiction, and virtual conferencing tools facilitate emotional presence? Teachers have always included videos of Shakespeare plays to allow for better access to the bard’s words. We take this idea to a new level, where the intentional application of technology captures an interaction with the content to develop students’ emotional presence within a Community of Inquiry framework.

Learning goals:

  • Define emotional presence
  • Place emotional presence in the Community of Inquiry framework
  • Explore technology to facilitate emotional responses
  • Discuss gamification as a tool to increase emotional presence
  • Identify strategies to develop emotional presence online and face-to-face

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Illuminating Instructor to Student Interaction with the Lightboard

Kelley Shaffer and Billy Gray, Tarleton State University

In this session, participants will see video examples of instruction delivered by faculty from different disciplines to show the diverse applications of using a lightboard to record instructor generated videos to increase instructor to student interaction and increase student engagement. In addition, participants can gain hands-on experience with a portable lightboard. Participants will also be provided with instructions and a materials list to build a lightboard for their own personal use.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Create Killer On-Line video with your iPhone

Steve Julin, Specs Howard School of Media Arts

Apple phones have always been able to capture footage but the new iPhone 10 has changed the playing field. Shooting great video has never been easier and we all know on-line learners love video. The new camera (that also works as a phone) can grab 1080p high-definition clips at 60 frames per second, take 240-fps slow-motion shots, shoot time lapse scenes, provide cinematic video stabilization, and even has up to 256 gigabytes of storage which is more than enough for a short film. Join two-time Emmy award winning filmmaker Steve Julin in the innovation lab as he’ll share his insights after testing the camera out on numerous video shoots and demo some filmmaker friendly iPhone gadgets. Participants will explore the film making capabilities of an iPhone; learn techniques to shoot short videos to engage students, and discover additional gear that can support the iPhone film making process. This session applies to iPhone 6 and later.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Demystifying Video Production in the Classroom

Aaron AuBuchon, Webster University

Recent research suggests that students who use video production tools and techniques to report findings in the classroom will be more engaged in the material, go deeper in their research, and retain more in the long run than students who only write papers. But inexperienced faculty often find the idea of encouraging or even requiring video reports to be daunting at best. The goal of this session it to show the value of video production as a method of reportage, to examine ways to frame assignments that make them valuable in that context, and the demystifying of basic production techniques. Participants will engage with the presenter in the making of a real video, and will be given access to all media files, rubrics, and other resources to work with outside of the presentation.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Introducing the What-A-Venture Innovation Software Platform

Randal Schober and Frank Marshall, Point Loma Nazarene University

Experiential learning is essential for a successful class in any discipline. At the heart of the experiential learning pedagogy is the fundamental belief that learning occurs when an individual is actively involved with concrete experiences. What-A-Venture is an online innovation project management tool that incorporates a six-step process that guides a business idea through a validated business strategy. In addition, it provides a channel of continuous communication between team members and mentors. The process is designed to get the startup investment ready, as critical assumptions are validated and common mistakes avoided. Learning in the classroom comes alive through lectures wrapped around the What-A-Venture’s innovation platform. Overall, What-A-Venture provides an effective experiential learning on-line tool that all teachers of entrepreneurship and project management could utilize.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Promoting Self-Directed Learning with Perusall’s Collaborative Annotations

Lauren Barbeau, Georgia Southern University

Critical thinking across disciplines depends on an ability to read, comprehend, and respond to course material, but students lack the self-directed learning skills necessary for effective reading. Perusall, a collaborative annotation website, encourages students to think critically and become self-directed learners by promoting assessment of the reading, evaluation of strengths and weaknesses in comprehension, application of effective reading strategies, and reflection on the reading. Participants will create Perusall accounts and access a reading on self-directed learning. They will use Perusall’s features to respond in real time to questions and comments embedded in the reading by other participants before engaging in a jigsaw to debrief the reading. Participants will write a reflection to prepare for a discussion of the ways Perusall promotes self-directed learning in students. The session will conclude with an overview of the instructor benefits from using Perusall.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Emergent Technologies

Tech Tools: Trial and Error in the Classroom

Kari Marks and Steve Peterson, Grand Canyon University

Many colleges support the use of technology as an engagement tool within the classroom. With so many tools to choose from, how does an instructor know which is the best tool? Through trial and error, tools that work and do not work, both for the instructor and the student, were discovered over several semesters at Grand Canyon University. Tech tools explored were Loom, FlipGrid, Kahoot, Biteable, and several more. The experience of using various tools dictated which tools could be effectively incorporated into the classroom that students enjoyed, faculty can use, and demonstrated that learning took place. This instructor found that the use of Kahoot Review vs a regular study guide increased test scores. Students also requested repeated use of the tool once it was used.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Advisory Board Session

Solving the Retention Puzzle: Leveraging Data Analytics to Retain Online Students

Deidre Price, Northwest Florida State College

The online course format has the potential to increase our access to information about students’ levels of engagement and comprehension in a course. By reviewing analytics from prior terms in a given course and point-in-time data about students’ activity and progress, instructors can intervene more effectively to impact students’ persistence in a course. Specific data tools reviewed in this session will include Blackboard Analytics, Analytics for Learn, and tool-specific analytics embedded in Blackboard Learn.


Learning Design

“Epidemic” Engagement: Infecting an Immersive Online Virology Course with Gamification

Tammy Garren, Strayer University and Eric Yager, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

How can you harness the attraction of immersive video games or a binge-worthy series to engage students from day one (and then keep them engaged)? Join us to see how we drew inspiration from shows like The Walking Dead and games like Pandemic and built an immersive, online environment in which apprentice virologists solve an epidemic and save the campus and surrounding community. From concept to delivery, the process took one year, cost less than $100, and required only two people: an instructional designer and a professor/subject matter expert. This session aims to share our experiences, the tools we used for planning and managing the project, the resources required, student feedback and learning gains, and lessons learned. Participants will leave this session with a better understanding of how to integrate an engaging, relevant, and media-rich story line into their online course to enhance student engagement and motivation as well as resources to manage such a project.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Designing Learner Centered Courses that Incorporate Social Media and Gaming

Rebecca Kirstein, Instructional Design Effects; Cecilia Toole, Meredith College

Learner-centered courses use student learning needs to create experiences where students take responsibility for their learning as well as making decisions about how to demonstrate the learning. Incorporating technology in the course design assists with the engagement of the students and provides resources for many ways that students can explore and verify their learning. Participants in this session will explore the key aspects of learner-centered course design, and discuss ways to incorporate different technologies, such as social media and gaming, to create learning activities and assessments.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

A “SURE” Thing: Schema, Understand, Reflect, and Engage!

Jill Purdy, Cedar Crest College

The SURE (Schema, Understand, Reflect, and Engage) model provides a foundation for instructional design for the online classroom. By creating an online classroom with this model in mind, instructors can promote a deeper understanding and a more lasting connection for the learner. Implementing strategies that activate schema, promote understanding, encourage reflection can combine for enhanced overall engagement and sustained learning of the concepts. Technological tools can serve the instructor in each of these areas and assist in creating an effective online classroom design. Technology examples that work well to integrate SURE are Screencasts, Padlets, Virtual Field Trips, Anticipation Guides, Short Reads/Videos, and Webquests to name a few.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Learning Design

Game-based Elements for Motivation and Engagement

Kristin Ziska Strange, University of Arizona

Gaming enthusiasts have long pointed to using games and game-based elements in courses to increase engagement. But where does that leave people who aren’t gamers? Does it require a complete overhaul of the class? What technologies do I need? This session will outline several ways you can use game-based elements and technologies to encourage student engagement and motivation within your course. They are quick and easy applications that will allow you to explore the idea of game-based learning without the gaming addiction or the hours of design time. After attending, you will be able to discern the difference between gamification, game-based, and gameful learning; you will be able to describe at least two low-stakes game-based methods that can be used in a course to increase engagement and motivation; and you will have a better understanding of how game-based methods can help students improve soft skills and critical thinking techniques for a better academic experience.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Argument Evaluation: An Interdisciplinary Activity Sequence

Katy Shorey, Northeastern University

Discover a roadmap for designing a sequence of active learning assignments that build toward a structured in-class team debate activity. Each step in the sequence includes a different use of technology to meet the specific interdisciplinary learning outcomes for the activity. The scaffolded steps build to a structured in-class team debate with designated roles, and the goal is to explain how this framework can be used to help students develop argument evaluation and critical thinking skills in any discipline. Although this sequence has been designed for easiest implementation in a class of 20–40 students, you also will learn ways to modify the sequence for larger or smaller classes. Participants will leave the session with an actionable activity and assignment sequence, rubrics, assignment templates, and examples of student deliverables from each activity in the sequence.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Learning Design

Gaming to Save the World

Kristin Ziska Strange, University of Arizona

The civilized world has ended, and it is up to you to build community, governance, and support the environment’s changing face. What do you do? And what can this teach our students? And what does this have to do with UDL? In this session, we’ll explore a game, how it works, how it was built, and how it was used to teach students very real lessons about themselves, their world, and their impact. We’ll also explore how to create games that align to outcomes that can be used in any classroom. After attending, you’ll be able to discuss opportunities for innovative course-based games that encourage student critical thinking, engagement with content, and can maximize mastery of the content; use game-based methods to apply the Universal Design for Learning Guidelines to classroom pedagogy; and use the Universal Design for Learning Guidelines and a game-based approach to generate student motivation and persistence within a class.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Pedagogical Use of Educational Video and Resources

Nancy R. Evans, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

There is substantial research promoting the use of video in the classroom as a dynamic resource for supporting curricula. According to a recent teacher survey, 94 percent of classroom teachers have effectively used video. Video is the third item (Use of Video for Classroom and Homework” in the “THE Journals” article on “10 Major Technology Trends in Education”. This session will highlight the pedagogical value of video-based learning for student engagement and active learning, as well as tips on media planning. Resources demonstrated include TedEd, Edpuzzle, H5P, and ThingLink.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Learning Design

Supporting Effective Teaching and Learning Principles with VoiceThread

Kathy Keairns, University of Denver

VoiceThread (VT) is a popular technology that can be used to support the seven principles of good practice and universal design for learning principles. VT can be used present content, enhance student and instructor presence, and foster learner engagement. Learners can add audio comments, video comments, or text comments to VoiceThread slides. Learn how VoiceThread was used to support several course competencies for an online course called Teaching, Learning and Technology, and how VoiceThread can be leveraged to “humanize” an asynchronous online course by giving learners an opportunity to see and hear the instructor, as well as see and hear each other. I’ll share what features are not included in the free basic version of VT and what you’ll get with the single user VT license. Attendees will be invited to participate in an asynchronous VoiceThread conversation about their key take-aways from the conference.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Engaging Students with Interactive Instructional Videos

Olha Ketsman, Northern Illinois University; Juan Colon Santana, Aurora University; and Tareq Daher, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Video is widely used and accepted as a teaching and learning tool in online, flipped, and blended courses. The body of literature addressing the use of video for instructional purposes highlights its positive effects. With newly developed software faculty can quickly embed questions into a video instantly transforming it from a passive to an interactive learning environment. Given the current simplicity in developing instructional videos with embedded questions, it is important to understand if students learn better in the learning environment where they watch an interactive video with embedded questions, versus a learning environment where they watch a passive video followed by questions as viable design options in blended and flipped courses. The literature on interactive videos lacks to examine differences in students’ achievement when quiz questions are presented within a video versus after a video. The present study addresses these practical and research needs. Participants in this session will discuss evidence-based findings of the development and implementation of instructional videos in the classroom; engage in a conversation regarding strategies and recommendations for using interactive videos to enhance students learning experiences; and discuss design principles and effective development strategies for instructional videos.

Evidence-based Learning Design
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Learning Design

Using Video Analysis for Student and Instructor Reflection and Evaluation

Tara Kaczorowski and Yojanna Cuenca-Carlino, Illinois State University

Learn how a cloud-based video analysis program (Vosaic Connect) is used in two undergraduate special education teacher preparation courses to help pre-service special education teachers notice and reflect on their use of evidence-based instructional practices. Students enrolled in these courses first use the program to recognize specific practices in video examples provided by the instructor, and eventually use it to reflect on their own teaching in a virtual simulation lab. Additionally, learn how this same program was also used by the course instructors as part of a peer mentoring initiative to reflect on their own instruction in the courses. Attendees will have the opportunity to tag and annotate a video. They will also engage in discussion about how video reflection can be used as a teaching tool in their own courses, including those outside teacher preparation programs. By the end of the session, participants will identify affordances of the Vosaic Connect platform as a tool for reflection and evaluation; tag and annotate a video within Vosaic Connect; brainstorm ideas for using video tagging/annotation in their own courses.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Why Do My Students Not Show Up for Office Hours?

Jana Fallin, David Fallin, Ben Ward, and Tucker Jones Kansas State University

Have you ever wondered why students don’t come by for office hours? Even with 300 students, only one might appear for office hours. We conducted surveys of large lecture classes and one smaller class asking questions about this. During the presentation we will share data from the surveys and the technology “fixes” to help with these issues. In addition to the questions about office hours, we ask questions on the survey about student habits. We will examine the use of multiple electronic devices and what that does to student concentration and effective study time. Using Poll Everywhere, we will share information from a survey of the participants. You’ll learn about ways to use technology to help your students prepare for exams and quizzes through augmented office visits; how to help students develop study habits that will make them more successful; and how to get undergraduate students to engage in the curricular materials using technology as a bridge to better learning.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Learning Design

Using Technology to Address Common Challenges to Flipped Classrooms

Kimberly Christopherson and Susie Lubbers, Morningside College

There are three common challenges that instructor face when flipping their classrooms: determining the best way to disseminate the content prior to class time; ensuring students complete the pre-class work to a sufficient level; and creating effective in-class activities while faced with limitations in time and resources. This session will discuss these three challenges and provide several recommendations for addressing each. Technology can play a vital role in each of these and specific ideas will be presented to the audience giving a variety of potential technology solutions. Participants will develop a small lesson plan for a single flipped class period during this session and will discuss and share other strategies from their own experience that have helped address these three challenges.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.



Active Learning Pedagogies

Advisory Board Session

Get Connected: Building Relationships through Interactive Video Conferencing Classrooms

Deidre Price, Northwest Florida State College

Videoconferencing’s innovative approach to instruction make resources go farther by making use of the traditional classroom space with its face-to-face dynamics and expanding its reach, but many instructors find it difficult to connect authentically with students who may be taking the course at remote sites. This presentation provides a range of strategies and tools, some built into the learning management system and others free and widely available online, to promote participation and engagement in videoconferencing classes to get and keep students connected.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Invited Session

Interactive Strategies for Engaging Students in Classes: Large, Small, and In Between

Toni Weiss, Tulane University

With the recognition that we all learn more when we understand the purpose of the material and its relevance to our lives, this session will engage participants in an investigation into both the need for and obstacles to incorporating active learning pedagogies in the classroom. Throughout the conversation, multiple techniques and activities that can be incorporated into a class with little to no planning will be seamlessly modeled and discussed.

Learning goals:

  • Gain an understanding of why active learning pedagogies are essential for deep learning
  • Recognize that an engaged classroom can take on many different configurations
  • Have a better understand what makes us reluctant to incorporate activities or technology in our classrooms
  • Be able to use multiple different techniques with little to no advanced planning

Experience-based


Active Learning Pedagogies

Creative Classroom Collaboration Using Zoom Video Conferencing

Jane Sutterlin and Emily Baxter, The Pennsylvania State University

Join us as we share our passion for using Zoom, a robust, indispensable and reliable video conferencing tool for working, teaching, and learning together. This session will engage participants with the Zoom video conferencing platform. We will demonstrate the many creative ways we have used Zoom in our classrooms including using live discussions to assess learning and clear up misconceptions, using breakout rooms for group discussions, and having students create collaborative presentations. We will also encourage participants to brainstorm and share other applications of video conferencing in the classroom.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Packback, Student Engagement: Flipping the Discussion Board Focus

Anna Parkman, The Ohio State University

Discussion boards allow for assessment of student learning while providing an opportunity for engagement outside the classroom. Benefits include enhancement of critical thinking skills and increased participation from learners who would not readily speak class. The format does come with challenges. Even well-crafted prompts can be misconstrued, moving an entire thread into a discussion of unrelated topics. Responses can be repetitive and discussion of the content between students is often limited. Monitoring, commenting, and grading is labor intensive. In this session I will discuss my experiences with DBs in multiple formats and impacts seen when piloting packback in my course. In packback, students are charged with the creation of well sourced questions about the content and responding to classmates’ questions. Students earn points for quality of the question and participation. Results related to student engagement, quality of interaction, and unexpected outcomes will be shared.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Technology Integration Versus Technology Use: Which One Am I Doing?

Paige Mask, Stephen F. Austin State University and Cathie Koss, Valdosta State University, New Mexico

Epiphany! Teaching Online doesn’t mean technology integration! This presentation will describe and demonstrate an education program’s action to integrate technology applications into the curriculum and create a sense of community and collaboration through technology integration. Multiple program assignments and projects (undergraduate and graduate) will be evaluated using the Technology Integration Matrix (TIM, 2009) developed by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology. Attendees will be able to identify the level of technology integration in their current instructional practices using a descriptive tool; after viewing presenter technology use within a program’s curriculum, attendees will be able to apply problem solving and decision making skills to increase an assignment’s level of technology integration and facilitation of collaboration and cooperation among learners; and attendees will be able to describe an assignment currently used in their program and evaluate the assignment for technology integration using the TIM matrix. If the assignment scores low in the TIM Matrix, recommendations for improving technology integration can be determined.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

The Power of Recognition, Fun, and Gratitude in Online Environments

Kimber Underdown and Crystal McCabe, Grand Canyon University

In online environments, faculty members often spend a great deal of time dealing with students who are at risk for failure but tend to ignore the students who are doing well. However, research shows that positive reinforcement and recognition are powerful tools to increase the outcomes of students. But how does a faculty member use recognition and gratitude in an online setting? This session will share simple, technology-driven tools for showing recognition and appreciation. These tools are free, simple to use, and have shown great results in our classes. Join us to learn how to utilize these technologies to increase student outcomes. You will understand the importance of recognition in the online classroom, with regards to student outcomes; use free technologies to practice showing recognition to students who are exceeding expectations; and make an action plan for using these free technologies (or others like them) in your own classrooms, tailored to your needs.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Translation of Traditional Debate Techniques into the Online Learning Platform

Veronica Wilbur, West Chester University

Traditionally, debates take place in the face-to-face environment, but in online courses, articulation of the debate process may be difficult to capture. To provide critical thinking online faculty utilize discussion boards as a common tool. But discussion boards raise the question, do they promote thoughtful student interaction and critical thinking? Too often students respond online with little or no substance. Several online platforms exist for both verbal and written debates, promoting a contemporary exchange of arguments, not just discussion. Faculty who are knowledgeable about the online debate process will find they have a new engaging tool to help students critically examine controversial topics and promote critical analysis. This session will inform faculty about the use of the debate process in an online environment, emphasizing critical thinking. Application of specific online tools, Voice Thread and Create Debate are highlighted.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Untethered Lecture Capture: Creating Collaborative Learning Environments

Lorretta Krautscheid, Samuel Williams, Ben Kahn, and Katie Adams, University of Portland

This research describes Untethered Lecture Capture (ULC) and its influence on learning. ULC is defined as using technology that permits faculty to be freely mobile within the classroom while simultaneously producing audiovisual lecture capture resources. Subjects were undergraduate students who experienced ULC in college classrooms. Following IRB approval, subjects (N=23) were interviewed and qualitative analysis was conducted. Study findings were interpreted within the context of cognitive load theory and the science of multimedia instruction. Students reported benefits of untethered faculty and lecture capture. Untethered teachers encouraged active participation by “teaching among us” rather than “talking at us” enhancing collaboration and engagement. Audiovisual lecture capture provided access to reusable learning products, “equalizing the playing field” among diverse student populations. ULC “reduced anxiety” during class, enhancing student focus and learning outcomes. In this session learn strengths and barriers associated with traditional lecture capture versus untethered screencasting lecture capture; discuss anticipated strengths and barriers associated with untethered teaching versus tethered teaching; and discuss and rehearse principles related to the science of multimedia instruction and cognitive load theory: signaling, spatial contiguity, temporal contiguity, coherence, intrinsic load, extraneous load, and germane load.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Using the Experiential Learning Cycle to build Technological Pedagogical Knowledge

Katrina Arndt, Susie Hildenbrand, and Kristen Love, St. John Fisher College 

A guiding principle for educational technology in teacher education is to build systems of professional learning to support instructors in strengthening their capacity to use technological tools (U. S. Dept. of Ed., 2016, p. 9). In this session, using Kolb’s Experiential Learning Cycle, we review the context of our teacher preparation program, including a continuum of faculty awareness, interest, and skill with educational technology. We share the ways that we strengthen and refresh our capacity to use technological tools and review participants’ strategies. We conclude with a demonstration of two strategies designed to developed Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK). Through discussion, participants will review the context for the case study and contrast that context with their own setting, they will explore the ways that they strengthen and continually refresh their capacity to use technological tools, and they will review and practice two strategies to support TPK development.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

43 to 0: Lecturing to Gaming for Success Using Kahoot!

Niki Bray, University of Memphis

Kahoot!, a free interactive gaming tool that students access from their mobile device (smart phone, tablet, or laptop), can be used in any class and at any level, regardless of the number of students. Kahoot! can also be assigned as homework and students can challenge classmates and others to test their content knowledge on a concept. Learn how an anatomical kinesiology course was redesigned using Kahoot! The observed impact was not only immediate but also astounding, as the failure rate plummeted from 43 percent historically to 0 percent, with no students dropping or withdrawing from the class. Eliminating lecturing for a more active approach not only revolutionized the classroom but also increased interest from other students not enrolled in the class. Kahoot! provided immediate feedback about what students already knew and what they didn’t know.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Creating an Active Learning Environment Using Technology

Susie Lubbers and Kim Christopherson, Morningside College

What happens that makes a class click? How can a course be designed to intentionally encourage students to click and to engage with each other and the instructor through active learning and technology? We will discuss what we know from research about how active learning using technology can create an environment in which students are actively engaged in their learning instead of being tired, stressed, or bored with their classes. The interactive presentation, designed to be a microcosm of the college classroom, will include activities that will allow participants to investigate possibilities for creating active learning using technology in their classes. After this session, participants will be able to identify key aspects of research supporting active learning and the use of technology in the classroom to enhance student learning; describe the characteristics of active learning; and discuss strategies and activities to create an active learning environment in the classroom using technology.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Deeper Learning Using Gaming, Project-Based Learning, and Concept-Mapping Strategies

Niki Bray, University of Memphis

Learn how one instructor re-designed a 120-student exercise physiology course based upon data and student feedback from a kinesiology course the previous semester. Using Kahoot!, a semester-long group project where students applied concepts learned in class to a real client and demonstrated their learning on a group website, and the use of concept-mapping activities to increase students’ understanding of how concepts relate to one another, student success sky-rocketed along with student’s enjoyment of the course. Participants will learn how these strategies can be used in large and small sized courses and across other disciplines. Participants will actively participate in a game of Kahoot! in lieu of a lecture-style presentation; they will develop the knowledge and skills needed to design an active learning experiences for their students using simple and free tools such as Kahoot!, Nearpod, and Google Docs in their courses; and they will engage in a rich discussion around the data analysis conducted.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Flip with Confidence and Elegance

Bei Zhang, Michigan State University

Extensive design work must be done to flip a classroom elegantly and successfully. Motivating students to prepare for a flipped class is a constant challenge. A successful instructor, now acting as a facilitator, must fulfill multiple roles as the course designer, mentor, role model, communicator, and even technical support. In a flipped classroom of team-based learning, meticulously planned, well designed, and orchestrated in-classroom discussions look student-centered, yet do not require much effort from the instructor. Here, a traditional face-to-face class was renovated using several web tools and technologies: Softchalk, PlayPosit, Panoptiq, Camtasia, Educreations, iClicker, and D2L. This created self-paced interactive lessons or lectures that prepare students before they come to the classroom, where they resolve the sophisticated case problems through individual and team effort. The course is completely flipped and runs as a fluid collaboration in a team-based learning format. In this session, learn how to convert a traditional classroom to more stimulating, inspiring and student-centered learning environment by adopting a variety of online teaching tools; promote and engage teacher-student, student-student and student-content interactions in and outside classroom via a variety of interactive activities to help students focus and learn efficiently; and unite social, teaching ,and cognitive presence of teaching and learning simultaneously as a coherent whole by creative and effective use of a combination of web tools and technologies.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Student Preferences and Best Practices Using Audience Response Systems

Heather LaPoint, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh

The use of audience response systems (ARS) has focused primarily on engagement, without regard to how learners are engaged. Understanding student preferences versus faculty perceptions with the use of ARS fosters student-centered instruction.

Social constructivism provides a framework to formulate new cognitive behaviors.

An observational cohort study design with a convenience sample of 48 baccalaureate nursing students. Students prefer live polling against peers, clarification of difficult concepts, team competition, and to foster discussion. Lower levels of engagement were linked to timed events and exam preparation. Use of ARS supports scaffolding through constructive feedback, dialogue, and reflection of knowledge. Best practices include the use of student-centered, engaging ARS activities. Future research should focus on larger sample sizes. In this session, participants will gain an understanding of student preferences vs. instructor practice with the use of audience response systems; they will disseminate current research data regarding best practice use of audience response systems; and understand how to engage millennial learners with intentional pedagogical design use of audience response systems.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Active Learning Pedagogies

Using Active Learning Classroom (ALC) to Improve Learning and Retention

Srinivasan Durairaj, Richland Community College

As an instructor of biology for fifteen years, teaching diverse student populations (India, Fiji, and the U.S.) has led me to create a teaching style that helps keep students interested in my courses. Now I am using a newly designed Active Learning Class (ALC) room with state-of-the-art technology at the Carroll Center for Innovative Learning at Richland Community College to teach my introductory biology course. Learn about the engagement strategies that are working in these courses and how students have responded to the active learning efforts. You’ll learn how easy it is to increase participation, confirm understanding, and measure student performance in a flexible active learning environment.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Faculty Development 

Invited Session

Copyright for Teaching with Technology

Thomas Tobin, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Faculty, designers, and administrators often have little guidance for using copyrighted materials for teaching. This interactive session from the author of The Copyright Ninja offers use-them-tomorrow lessons to keep U.S. and Canadian educators on the "good side" of copyright law.

Learning goals:

  • Define and apply principles of fair use / fair dealing
  • Provide alternative means of access to copyrighted content
  • Determine when copyright does and does not apply for teaching-with-technology scenarios
  • Design tech-based interactions that respect copyright, licenses, and permission agreements

Disclaimer: This session is an overview of various models and methods regarding copyrighted content and ownership of intellectual property. The facilitator is not a legal professional, and no part of this session is intended to constitute legal advice.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Faculty Development 

New Faculty Orientation with a Twist—A Semester-long Course in Teaching and Learning

Dawn Ford, Elizabeth Crawford, Valerie Rutledge, and Mary Marr, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

According to a 2016 Gallup Poll of college and university presidents, the most pressing challenge is “How to best engage and educate students for bright and meaningful futures.” How do we prepare faculty to meet this challenge? Few higher education faculty have formal training in teaching and learning, so we must support faculty through high quality hands-on experiences that model best practices in teaching and learning. This presentation will provide a case study of a required new faculty pedagogy course that was implemented and assessed in Fall 2017 and Spring 2018. This course was developed as a provost initiative and supported by deans and department heads. The hybrid course, delivered by an instructional team of faculty and administrators, was designed using Quality Matters standards with embedded technology tools, including a digital portfolio. Lessons learned and sample active learning activities will be shared.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Faculty Development 

Supporting Online Faculty

Sharon Gray, Augustana University

How does an institution provide not just technical support but a sense of campus belonging for online instructors who will never set foot on the physical campus? How does it help them become an integral part of a team and not simply feel like hired hands? Augustana University has both on-site full-time and online adjunct faculty teaching its completely online master of arts in education program. For the first years of the program, there was substantial turnover among the online adjunct faculty. In 2017, Augustana began hosting regular Zoom meetings that included both the on-site faculty and the off-site adjunct faculty. Not only did technical support and instructional delivery questions get answered more quickly and efficiently, but the off-site adjunct instructors reported feeling like more of a team. In this session, you’ll hear tips for successfully supporting online faculty in an entirely online program. You’ll leave with strategies for providing both technical and instructional design support for online adjunct faculty, and for helping online adjunct faculty feel like members of a team; you will see how providing screencasts answering FAQs from experienced online instructors can be an efficient just-in-time resource; and you’ll learn the value of providing opportunities for on-site and off-site faculty to share what works and what doesn’t in order to improve an online program.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Faculty Development 

Coaching Faculty to Student Success Utilizing Key Performance Indicators

Steve Peterson and Kelly Padilla, Grand Canyon University

A Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is a performance measuring tool used to evaluate the success of an organization or activity. Identifying and analyzing critical performance measures through the integration of a KPI dashboard supports efficacious faculty coaching which leads to effective operationalization of student success. A collaborative, operational approach tying scheduling and faculty recruiting together provides a synergy of effectiveness leading to faculty retention, academic excellence, and student success.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Faculty Development 

Beyond Mentoring: A Model for Partnering with New Adjunct Faculty

Linda Gunn, Central Michigan University College of Graduate Studies

Institutions of higher education want new faculty to become quickly oriented and acclimated to their culture and methods. Adjunct faculty may require even more support as they may have limited opportunities to interact with campus staff and faculty. This session reveals a new model program for creating and sustaining new faculty at Central Michigan University. Participants will leave with a better understanding of new faculty needs and strategies that can be used at any institution.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Faculty Development 

Lessons Learned from Creating an In-House Professional Development Program

Vicky Morgan and Mark White, College of Saint Mary and Eric Kyle, Methodist College

This session is about home-grown professional development programs that are designed to help higher education faculty create pedagogically sound courses that use technology well to enhance quality instruction. College of Saint Mary developed such a program and have three cohorts of faculty who have completed the program. Designers of the program learned meaningful lessons while planning and facilitating faculty progress through it. While positive results were evident, including some that were unanticipated, harder lessons about what not to do were also apparent. As part of this session, participants and presenters will collaborate to analyze and evaluate this professional development approach, as well as to generate new ideas. Participants will gain knowledge about creating home-grown professional development programs; gain knowledge about learner outcomes from participating in such a program; and discuss and offer ideas from their own experiences.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Faculty Development 

The Transformative Development Process of Online Instructors

Sarah McMahon, Endicott College

This study focuses on faculty who have several years of experience teaching in online learning environments and examines their lived experiences with digital pedagogy to understand what challenges they face when teaching in virtual environments. Attention is paid to understanding how the online teaching experience affects interactions with students, academic identity, and pedagogical beliefs. The researcher will provide an in-depth analysis of the transformational process instructors go through as they renegotiate their authority in the digital learning environment. Arranged by typology, we will examine how inconsistencies between instructors’ expectations and experiences lead to the development of internal crises; where instructors seek support to resolve such these conflicts; and how instructors come to accept new ideas to resolve such discrepancies and incorporate them into their evolving online academic identities and digital pedagogical practices.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is experienced in this topic and ready to learn more.


Student Assessment

Can You Hear Me Now? Written vs. Audio Feedback

Karen Wink, U.S. Coast Guard Academy

How can the act of response become more effective for student learning and less burdensome for the teaching professor? Audio commentary can result in more aligned understanding and impact on subsequent papers. Students are more “plugged in” than past generations and engage more so in technology-based approaches to learning. Audio commentary offers more connections with student writers. This session will discuss the pros and cons of written vs. audio comments for student papers, summarize classroom-based studies on commentary, and introduce and practice a duplicable approach to audio commentary with a user-friendly Word application.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Student Assessment

No More Excuses: Feedback Students Will See and Use!

Kimber Underdown, Katie Sprute, and Crystal McCabe, Grand Canyon University

Grading and feedback are areas that instructors struggle with, especially in confirming that students see the feedback and use it to make changes. Using technology, instructors can feel more confident that their students are actually viewing the feedback and can then make changes. Loom is an extension tool for Google Chrome that can allow instructors to provide video feedback. Paired with the use of Remind, instructors can send out the feedback and be notified when students have viewed it. This session will help to bring awareness to these technologies and how pairing them can bring more effective grading and feedback. You’ll learn to use new technologies to make assessment more relevant for students; save time while encouraging greater student engagement with assessment result; and pair free technologies to add value to online learning management systems and assessment within those systems.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Has some experience with this topic.


Student Assessment

Swivl Video Recording Technology

Gina Gray, Penn State Scranton

This interactive session will discuss how incorporating technology, specifically the Swivl video recording system, into classes can enhance teaching and individualize student learning. Through a pilot project, two instructors were able to incorporate the Swivl video recording technology into very different classes (communication arts and science and kinesiology). Objectives for using Swivl will be reviewed, as well as modifications made along the way, and lessons learned. Example videos from these projects, student feedback on the projects, and an instructor’s assessment of the projects will be shared.

Experience-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.


Student Assessment

Gamification of Assessment: PaGamO

Hang-Wei Hao, Gordon College

Gamification, the utilization of game elements to non-game settings, continues to grow in popularity as a method to increase student engagement beyond classroom. Gamification can take a variety of forms, including the use of narratives to change the context around a typical activity, the creation of social competition, and the incentivizing of behavior through badge and reward systems. By applying gamification to course assessments, students could be motivated to learn in new ways or enjoy otherwise tedious tasks. In this session, learn about a new education platform, PaGamO, that turns homework assignments/in-class assessments into “games”; that is, into competitive social interactions, and this with the view to increasing the pleasure of homework for students. You will learn to implement gamification in an online course to engage students; incorporate PaGamO as a summative assessment tool for education; and evaluate the effectiveness of PaGamO.

Evidence-based
Target Audience: Is new to this topic.