Concurrent Sessions

The Leadership in Higher Education Conference represents the leading thinking on strategic issues in higher education today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected presentations through a rigorous blind review process. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return as invited presenters with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the general sessions and creates content in these areas.

⸻ Look for sessions in the tracks: ⸻

Leadership and Professional Development Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Institutional Evaluation and Assessment Hiring, Development, and Retention
Institutional Culture and Climate Student Recruitment, Retention, and Success
Special Topics in Academic Leadership

Leadership and Professional Development

Invited Session

Emotionally Intelligent Leadership that Empowers, Moves Culture, and Creates Engagement

David Katz III, Mohawk Valley Community College
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

In this multi-dimensional, interactive, experiential, and fun presentation we will learn: leadership is about empowering others, and empowering others requires positive, safe, connected, and affirming relationships; as leaders we have a profound impact upon the emotional state of the people we engage with each day; and the neuroscience confirms that the affective domain powerfully impacts cognition, persistence, motivation, self-efficacy, and performance. We will then practice skills and model behavior that creates positive, motivated, engaged collaboration. The primary objective is to empower leaders by wrapping skills around these concepts in order to become even more transformational leaders.


Coaching Conversations for Academic Leaders: Bringing Out the Best in Yourself and Others

Susan Robison, Professor Destressor and Susan Robison Associates
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

The interpersonal aspects of academic leadership, e.g., annual reviews, performance evaluations, or other difficult conversations with faculty, can be especially challenging to the inexperienced chair/dean. In this interactive workshop, you will practice several powerful brain-based coaching skills drawn from Improv games to increase your skills and confidence for leadership that matters: transformational coaching conversations that build institutional collegiality, civility, and engagement. Participants will apply a structure for shaping such conversations (ASK – assess client motivation, set agenda, keep success continuous) in dyad practice and then to shape a facilitator/volunteer demonstration of these skills.


Emotional Labor: Staying Resilient, Working Well

Susan Robison, Professor Destressor and Susan Robison Associates
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Emotional labor is the work that supports colleagues, faculty and students struggling with emotional difficulties that threaten to interfere with work or studies. While it brings both the satisfaction and challenge of connection, it can also lead to stress and burnout especially since it often falls disproportionally on the shoulders of women and POC. This practical workshop will offer models for understanding the origin and function of emotions and a set of strategies to structure emotional labor and increase your own resilience and resistance to burnout. Participants will be encouraged to adapt the materials for use with your own faculty.


Leadership Development in Higher Education…a Way Forward

Alan Sebel, Laurie Bobley , and Sabra Brock, Touro College
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Institutions, regardless of their primary educational/professional focus, must maintain and develop the leadership capacity of competent faculty who have the potential to lead the institution in turbulent times. We will present outcome evidence to support the success of our initiative in assisting our institution to accomplish this through an innovative faculty development project: the Touro College Academy of Leadership and Management (TCALM). TCALM supports the college’s efforts to prepare candidates for professional advancement and addresses succession planning. This interactive session will discuss how we brought TCALM to fruition. Participants will have the opportunity to explore if such a program is relevant to their own institution and how to begin to develop it.


The OODA Loop and Higher Education Decision-Making

Scott Zimmerman, William Woods University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

The OODA Loop – (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act) is a little-known quick decision-making tool used by militaries and corporations worldwide. With the myriad of challenges facing higher education today, leaders who can move through their decision-making process the quickest position themselves to survive and thrive. Attendees will learn the OODA Loop components, how to shorten the gap between decision and action, how established mental models support or undermine good decisions, and how the application of OODA Loop concepts enables better decision-making.


Invited Session

Cultivating Leadership Skills in Early-Career Faculty

Russell Carpenter and Sara Zeigler, Eastern Kentucky University
60-Minute Session

This session focuses on strategies for developing leadership skills in early-career faculty. Academic administrators at a variety of levels are often in position to support, mentor, and guide early-career faculty as they prepare for various levels of responsibility within and across the institution. Many administrators are expected to lead, mentor, or assess early-career faculty as they acclimate to the expectations of the promotion and tenure process, including establishing a research agenda, teaching, and service. Success in these areas of the professoriate often takes priority; however, faculty are also being asked to lead from the early years they arrive on campus. Their new institutions expect them to bring or possess the skills they need not only to navigate complicated academic terrain but also serve as productive members of departmental, college, and institution-wide initiatives. In many cases, early-career faculty are asked to lead with minimal or no related leadership development. Based on years of higher education academic administrative experience as a faculty member and university leader, the facilitator will guide participants through a multi-step process of skill development and strategies that prioritize practical approaches for cultivating leadership in early-career faculty that participants can readily apply and transfer to their own contexts.


Invited Session

Building a Comprehensive Faculty Mentoring from Scratch: Lessons Learned

Leslie Gates and Oliver Dreon, Millersville University
60-Minute Session

In this session, we will discuss our process developing a faculty mentoring program on our campus, and the scholarship and evidence that have informed our work. While the development continues, we will outline the steps we’ve taken to foster a campus culture which recognizes and supports the need for faculty mentoring across one’s career span. We will also discuss the lessons we’ve learned along the way and our anticipated next steps. This session will include opportunities for attendees to examine and discuss mentoring needs on their own campuses.


Succession Planning: Why the Future Needs Strong Mentorship Today

Julie Piepenbring, College of St. Rose and Todd Rofuth, Southern Connecticut State University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

All organizations including higher education experience both anticipated and unanticipated changes in leadership. Proactive mentorship of faculty and staff can be a crucial part of ensuring future success in higher education administration. This presentation is about proactive succession planning through the application of best mentoring practices. Upon completion of this workshop participants will: learn to identify what skills sets are needed for future leaders and develop mentorship plans that will guide a smooth transition; maximize interpersonal skills to effectively and efficiently mentor future leaders to successfully execute succession plans;  apply an integrated approach to mentoring with cultural humility that is individually tailored for optimal impact; and employ enhanced skills when engaging and supporting mentees in the moment that increases learning and professional growth, without overextending time commitments.


Where Education and Leadership Converge: Leadership Development for the Whole Learner-Leader

Sara Spear, Rutgers University
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Leadership development program participants are learners of leadership and therefore, programs should be grounded in both education and leadership theory. This session will introduce a conceptual model that recognizes participants as both whole learners and whole leaders, moving beyond the traditional individual cognitive approach to consider other domains and dimensions of development. This model has been piloted in the design of a faculty administrator leadership development program, and attendees will learn how such a model can be used to guide the curriculum, delivery format, and assessment methods.


Servant Leadership During Times of Uncertainty

Stephanie Hinshaw, Butler University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Being an effective and positive leader is challenging, even when times are certain. Leading in a time of uncertainty can be downright scary. This presentation explores how seven key components of servant leadership can assist leaders in leading during times of uncertainty. Robert Greenleaf, the creator of the servant leadership philosophy, shared the best test of servant leadership is if people grow as a result of their leader (Keith, 2016). Servant leaders accomplish this tall order of helping others grow by engaging in several vital behaviors. Specifically, Sipe and Fick (2015) identified seven key components servant leaders possess to help others grow. These components include: Person of Character: Is honest, trustworthy, authentic, and humble; Puts People First: Expresses genuine care and concern for others, aids in a way that promotes growth; Skilled Communicator: Listens to understand and communicates with influence, not authority; Compassionate Collaborator: Strives to build a caring, collaborative community to improve the quality of life; Has Foresight: Effectively creates and articulates a shared vision and anticipates potential consequences of decisions; Systems Thinker: Connects systems thinking with decisions and ethical issues; Leads with Moral Authority: Empowers others and creates systems to support quality. These behaviors can, and many would argue, should be used by leaders in times of uncertainty to aid in providing stability to their teams. The presenter will discuss these seven components and how they aid leaders during uncertain times in times.



Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Title IX Hearings—Challenges and Best Practices

Dan Schorr and Alyssa-Rae McGinn, Dan Schorr, LLC
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

The presenters will utilize their extensive hearing and trial experience to instruct how to conduct fair, reliable, and comprehensive proceedings for Title IX and other types of misconduct matters. Title IX hearings under the 2020 Department of Education regulations are complex and high-pressure for all involved. They require a hearing chair who is intimately familiar with relevant Title IX law and campus policy, is an expert in evidentiary rules, and is able to successfully oversee hearings with the appropriate temperament. The presentation will help Title IX professionals serve as single-person decision makers or three-person hearing panels.


“What Could I Possibly Say?” Addressing Racist Dialogue in the Classroom

Lauren Cardon and Cassander Smith, University of Alabama
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Attitudes about race, impacted by our current political environment, have produced pedagogical challenges for professors who teach subjects that involve discussions of racial difference. In this session, we will lead a workshop on navigating our most challenging moments in the classroom. We provide a community-sourced “starter’s” guide designed to help teacher-scholars discuss race in the college classroom. The guide consists of how-to prompts that provide specific language to foster productive conversation around issues of race, including how to prime students for difficult topics; how to address a harmful comment when the student does not intend harm; how to open up discussion when students want to shut it down; and what to say when you don’t know what to say.


Bridging the Gap Between Classroom and Community

David Rivera and Mary Rose Pedron, Flagler College
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Educational institutions often serve as beacons for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. It has become increasingly important that conversations be had regarding both the positive and negative results of institution’s actions with regard to DEI initiatives and programs. This session provides an opportunity for evaluation of programs implemented by a small liberal arts college located in the northeastern part of Florida. At the conclusion of this presentation attendees should be able to evaluate their levels of perspective-taking, communication and collaboration among stakeholders, and cultural knowledge and self-awareness.


Policy to Action: Learners Learning With, From, and About Anti-Racism

Moni Fricke, Laura MacDonald, Camisha Mayes, and Lori Davis, University of Manitoba
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

As part of a longitudinal interprofessional collaboration (IPC) curriculum for healthcare students, IPC faculty partnered with Indigenous educators to deliver an IPC session on the role of collaboration for anti-racism in healthcare. Building on anti-racism policy, multiple simultaneous virtual platforms facilitated discussion on anti-racism and population health for 650 health professional students. Private breakout rooms with an Indigenous mentor offered learners psychological safety, while faculty guided learners through a series of discussions. By the end of this session, participants will explore the role of IPC curriculum for facilitating collective action against racism while considering learner safety in this context.



Institutional Evaluation and Assessment

Quality Indicators in Online Learning Design: What to Look For

Dan Keast, The University of Texas Permian Basin
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

There are critical elements to indicate quality in every online course. Those indicators will lead to student success and are built in during the design phase. The elements are described in this session around the context of three types of presence: student-instructor, student-content, and student-student. Along with presence, the policies and procedures need to include certain guarantees to the student for feedback and responses, communication guidelines, and rubrics for equity in graded material.


Strategic Planning During a Constantly Changing Environment

Kelly Gillerlain, Tidewater Community College
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Creating a strategic plan during a pandemic while incorporating all stakeholders, new institutional leadership, and a changing higher educational landscape is a daunting process. This session will give an overview of the two-year intensive process, as well as hurdles faced while writing the plan. Some changes the committee faced included:  the hiring of a new president, a President’s Cabinet restructure, the integration of our Quality Enhancement Plan for our SACSCOC mid-year report, and a steep enrollment decline. Methods used to engage the college community will be previewed and a demonstration on the importance of “following the data” will be presented.



Hiring, Development, and Retention

Invited Session

Courageous Conversations in Higher Education

Seena Haines, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; Jenny Van Amburgh, Northeastern University; and Susan Stein, Sue M. Stein Consulting, LLC
60-Minute Session
Audience is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more

We all encounter conflict in our responsibilities in academics. This session will aid attendees in applying effective techniques associated with conflict resolution and negotiation. Participants will complete inventories that help frame the way they approach conflict and speakers will offer strategies rooted in positive psychology that can foster relationship strengthening and organizational health through times of disagreement.


Models for Successful Mission Integration of Adjunct Faculty

Christine Knaggs, Adrian College
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

The reliance on adjunct faculty at four-year institutions necessitates study into the quality of institutional integration efforts. This study uses the “Essential Elements of Faculty Work” framework (Gappa and Austin, 2010), survey data from adjunct faculty, and existing effective integration models at institutions to make recommendations for mission integration efforts of adjunct faculty within higher education.


Revitalizing Faculty Development Events through Collaborative Efforts

Latisha Haag and Cyndi Landis, Fort Hays State University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Faculty development events support professional growth covering a variety of topics that meet the ever-changing demands of teaching students. However, campuses are often plagued by too many faculty development events that are poorly attended. Developers quickly tire from planning events to see the same few familiar faces. By examining case studies and learning strategies that combine university forces to create events that better meet the needs of the university community, attendees will examine internal department strengths and goals to identify collaborative opportunities across campus; define elements of collaborative faculty development planning; and discuss application strategies for planning collaborative events.


The Care & Feeding of Mid-Career Faculty: Professional Development Across the Career Life Cycle

Lynne Texter, La Salle University and Jenepher Lennox Terrion, University of Ottawa
60-Minute Session
Audience is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more

To build and sustain faculty vitality and engagement, leaders must find ways to support and encourage faculty at all stages of the career life cycle. There are many formal and informal development opportunities for assistant professors on the tenure track, but once tenure has been achieved, faculty may be exhausted, disillusioned, or unclear about how to continue their development. This necessitates programs for continued professional development. This panel will explore the challenges for mid-career faculty; propose programs and activities for continued professional development; enable participant reflection; and share best practices for institutions, chairs, and mid-career faculty.



Institutional Culture and Climate

Preparing Faculty for 21st Century Classroom Teaching: A Faculty-Driven Initiative

Julie Ashlock and Susan Nusser, Milwaukee Area Technical College
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Launched in May 2020, the 21st Century Classroom work team at Milwaukee Area Technical College responded to an institution-wide shift to online teaching by creating a growth mindset self-assessment tool for faculty who need to both evaluate and demonstrate their online teaching skills. This rapid transition to online was prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic and required 1300 faculty at MATC, teaching everything from truck driving to English literature, to meet the same set of online teaching standards so that they could continue their teaching in online, face-to-face, and hybrid environments. Working under pressure from the global pandemic, and during the college’s structural reorganization to the Guided Pathways framework, the work team used Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) to create buy-in across the institution. Committing to the process enabled the work team to overcome resistance and develop a single set of flexible and inclusive standards for all instructors, prompting a shift in the institutional culture towards a more supportive teaching environment that empowers faculty to direct their own professional development.


Effect of a Shared-Governance Organizational Structure on Organizational Culture

Rod Jonas, Carmelita Lamb, Kim Marman, Heidi Nieuwsma, Brenda Tufte, and Becky Meidinger,
University of Mary
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

The administrative team at the University of Mary has developed a shared governance organizational structure that gives faculty the administrative authority to lead their respective academic programs. As a result, our faculty actively collaborate to achieve program and school initiatives and we have been able to develop the trusting relationships needed to make shared governance work. This session will help higher education leaders learn how to restructure academic units for the purpose of developing a shared governance structure and positive collaborative culture, and to learn how to develop holistic faculty workloads that include administrative responsibilities.


Using Departmental Action Teams (DATs) to enact change in higher education

Courtney Ngai, Colorado State University and Joel Corbo and Sarah Wise, University of Colorado Boulder
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Making positive and sustained change in higher education is challenging. The Departmental Action Team (DAT) Model utilizes facilitated teams to develop departmental culture that supports and sustains change. In this session, participants will: gain a foundational understanding of the DAT model and the types of change it can catalyze; learn best practices for championing DATs at their own institution; and identify potential campus initiatives that the DAT model can support.


Ready to Rumble: Conflict Management for University Leaders

Jill Parrott, Eastern Kentucky University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

While not all conflict is bad, problems arise when conflict is actively ignored, leading to decreases in clarity, trust, and engagement with simultaneous increases in problematic behavior. In academia, conflict is exacerbated if we misinterpret collegiality to mean “I cannot confront any conflict.” When university leaders are not prepared to address incompatible interests or goals, institutional climate is negatively affected, leading to dysfunctional work environments and low faculty/staff retention. This session asks participants to reflect on their reactions to conflict; to identify multiple approaches to resolution; and to apply conflict management tools to their home contexts.


Servant Leadership: A Contemporary Leadership Model for Colleges & Universities

Steven Bloomberg, Southeast Arkansas College
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Servant leadership represents a compelling philosophy framed by the self-sacrificing leader who places the needs of followers first and cultivates an altruistic culture inside the organization. The trait of serving first differentiates servant leaders from other styles of leadership. Learn how Southeast Arkansas (SEARK) College transformed its culture from a decades-long authoritative leadership style to one of servant leadership. The infusion of a new, inclusive culture has resulted in programmatic and enrollment growth. A significant factor in these successes was the integration of the ten essential traits associated with servant leadership.



Student Recruitment, Retention, and Success

International Studies In Post-Pandemic Times: How Do We Move Forward?

Jacqueline Leary-Warsaw, Benjamin T. Rome School of Music, Drama, and Art and Duilia de Mello, The Catholic University of America
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Higher education leaders must re-envision and redevelop post-COVID plans for global study programs, student/faculty exchanges, and recruitment of international students. Throughout the pandemic, international studies programs have been significantly impacted as students were forced to return to the United States and their home countries, and study abroad plans were indefinitely put on hold. The need to rebuild global programs for students will now require a lengthy period of reconstruction. What are the steps to begin a sustainable process that supports international study and cross-cultural experiences in a post-COVID world? This session will explore this important question, and seek to present practices for reengaging international study, student/faculty exchanges, and other global initiatives.


Peer Mentoring Program Improves Academic Success through Proactive Partnerships

Amber Miller, Shivas Amin, and Michalina Mrugala, University of St. Thomas, Houston
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

At the University of St. Thomas, a small, liberal arts, Hispanic Serving Institution, a peer mentoring program (PMP) changed the perspective of academic support services. Our PMP is based on a partnership between faculty teaching freshman and sophomore level STEM courses and a qualified student (peer mentor). This partnership fosters a proactive attitude on utilizing academic support services and creates inclusive learning environments. Participation in the PMP increased first-year retention rates from 71.3% to 95.5% and increased cumulative GPAs from 3.18 to 2.65 for students attending sessions across the academic year. Additionally, online peer mentoring resulted in record high usage.


Success in College Science Courses Begins with Academic Language

Michalina Mrugala and Amber Miller, University of St. Thomas, Houston
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

This presentation is a collaboration between ESL (English as Second Language) and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) professionals at the University of St. Thomas and utilizes data collected from faculty and students about expectations and preparedness for language in STEM. Furthermore, we will outline a model of academic language improvement process, from student identification to academic language application and practice.  We will also share our success stories, such as improved global academic performance, student self-awareness, STEM faculty involvement, an increasing number of return visits, and improved scores on the nursing program entry exam.


Supporting First-Year and Transfer Students Using Campus-Wide Resources

Jennifer Schum and Lisa Copenhaver, Hood College
60-Minute Session
Audience is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more

Student success and persistence to graduation is a topic relevant to all institutions, and discussing the strengths and weaknesses of this model will support further development and discussion of first-year student support for each institution. Participants will leave with an understanding of the holistic approach Hood College is using to support first-year and transfer student success. Participants will become familiar with the model including the alert system, academic success course, and the need for academic advisors to be a part of this model. We will review the strengths and weaknesses while discussing the need for awareness, active outreach, and academic support to help improve student success.



Special Topics in Academic Leadership

College and University Leadership is a System not a Person

Kimberly Paddock-O’Reilly and Lee Van Dusen, Logan University
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

We often think about leadership from the perspective of the traits, qualities, or abilities that are possessed by well-known leaders. In higher education, it may be beneficial to think about leadership as system rather than what is accomplished by an individual. This presentation will explore the complexity of higher education leadership and provide insight into using formal and informal leadership throughout your organization to make decisions, communicate, engage your workforce, and move forward. Qualities and benefits of a leadership system in higher education will be identified with the goal of applying these to your institution.


Leading Change with Courage, Commitment, Grit, and Humility

Bruce Kusch, Ensign College
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

Leading positive and productive change is an essential skill for every academic leader. Some changes are small and easily implemented, others monumental and high-risk. An academic leader may recognize change is necessary but knowing how to lead the change probably isn’t something learned in graduate school. This session will dive into the messiness and challenges of just what it takes to courageously lead institutional change—things that work and the pitfalls and mistakes to avoid. Participants will explore a case study to help develop their own practical roadmap, strategies, and courageous commitment so needed in today’s challenging environment. Participants will: discuss the importance of leading positive and productive change; identify why leading change is so challenging; discuss key skills and methods of leading institutional change, while also identifying pitfalls to avoid; develop their own roadmap and strategies for leading change.


Faculty Insight on Impact of COVID-19 for Existing Online Course(s)

Cheryl Holden and Susie Wynn, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, a pandemic. The rapid onset of COVID-19 resulted in a disturbance for every facet of human life, including higher education across the world. The study was conducted at a 4-year university, offering graduate and undergraduate degrees, certificates, and training programs. The target population includes faculty and others teaching an online course(s) when the pandemic was announced. The study aimed to answer two research questions related to the impact of COVID-19 on faculty teaching online. Data analysis confirms that COVID-19 directly impacted faculty teaching online course(s). Concluding this presentation, participants will have the ability to: understand the impact on faculty as a result of COVID-19; describe various types of self-care and coping strategies for faculty teaching online course(s); and implement faculty insights to prepare future online course(s).


Invited Session

Community Collaborations: Reimagining and Rebuilding

Brad Williams, Dallas College – El Centro Campus

COVID-19 forced higher education and its community partners to abandon time-tested processes in pursuit of flexible workflows responsive to a steady stream of changing information, and each day’s new set of insights and challenges. This session presents a series of scenarios and solutions for reengaging community partners to achieve unimaginable outcomes. We’re stronger together when we leverage our collective capacity.


Invited Session

Control Your Attention, Control Your Life!

Seena Haines, The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; Jenny Van Amburgh, Northeastern University; and Susan Stein, Sue M. Stein Consulting, LLC

To be consistently productive and manage stress better, we must strengthen our skill in attention management: the practice of controlling distractions, being present in the moment, finding flow, and maximizing focus. Rather than allowing distractions to derail, choose where you direct your attention at any given moment, based on an understanding of your priorities and goals. This session is more than just exercising focus. It’s about taking back control over your time and your priorities. After attending, you will be able to identify and discuss sources that of time wasters, energy drainers and distractions; explore how transparency, identity, mindfulness and energy (TIME) can contribute to better time efficiencies; complete and analyze a time analysis inventory and describe key strategies and evidence-supported solutions to prioritize tasks and recover time; share additional assessment tools and principles to help us be more efficient and productive; and create a two-part action plan for improving time efficiency to foster work life integration.


Decision-Making Approaches in Higher Education

Todd Rofuth, Southern Connecticut State University and Julie Piepenbring, College of Saint Rose
60-Minute Session
Audience has some experience with this topic

This workshop offers attendees the opportunity to practice skill development and acquisition of various problem-solving and decision-making strategies that can be employed for resolving problems and making decisions that strengthen organizational function and sustainability within the context of the issues facing higher education today. After attending, you will be able to apply the taxonomy of comprehension to assist in leadership problem-solving and decision-making; decide which of the various approaches to decision-making should be used depending on the situation, and then implement the correct approach; and critique the decision-making process you have selected to identify pitfalls of decision-making and employ solutions to overcome them.


The Power Of A Project: Creating Impactful Student Experiences

Amanda Langendoerfer and Janet Gooch, Truman State University
60-Minute Session
Audience is new to this topic

Acknowledging the benefits of experiential and project-based learning to student support, retention and ultimate graduation, Truman State University set out to create a unique, hands-on experience which brought collaboration, problem-solving, and interdisciplinary thinking to the fore-front of a new student experience. The Truman Symposium offers students opportunities to consider local and global challenges while building and understanding the concept of community. This session will provide an  analysis of this new program; participants will learn  practical strategies for implementing curricular change (including adjustments for COVID), building faculty collaboration, developing institutional leadership, scaffolding student learning experiences, and ensuring sustainability of design.