Concurrent Sessions

The Teaching Professor Annual Conference brings teachers just like you from around the country to present their best thinking, solutions, and strategies on teaching and learning topics faced by educators today. Concurrent sessions are peer selected in several ways. Outstanding presenters from the previous conference—as evaluated by conference attendees—return for invited sessions with either an updated or reprised version of their top-scoring presentation. After an open call for proposals, the conference advisory board members choose selected sessions through a rigorous blind review process. Finally, the advisory board determines trends or topics not addressed by the selected sessions and creates content in these areas.

⸻ Look for sessions in these tracks: ⸻

Preparing Your CourseTeaching Specific Student Populations
Assessing LearningEquity, Diversity, Inclusion
Student EngagementTeaching in the Health Sciences
Technology Tools for TeachingInstructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated
Online Teaching and LearningFor New Faculty
Faculty Support

Topical Area 1: Preparing Your Course

Advisory Board Session

Cheating is a Choice—Instructional Strategies Promoting Better Learning Decisions

Lolita Paff, associate professor, Penn State Berks

Most decisions are based on internal cost-benefit analyses. “Do I work an extra hour or go out with my friends?” “Do I write the term paper or buy one online?” The decision to buy a paper makes sense if the perceived marginal benefit from buying is greater than the perceived marginal cost. Put another way, a student will buy the paper/HW/assignment (or just not do it) if the marginal benefit of completing it is less than the marginal cost of time and effort.

As cheating has become more sophisticated, so has the academy’s responses, with a great deal of attention on reducing access to the “supply” side of the market. Frequently missing from the conversation are the ways teachers can (and I would assert should) influence demand. Join us as we explore: circumstances and factors associated with academic dishonesty; course characteristics designed to reduce motivation and opportunity to cheat; and instructional strategies that promote academic honesty.


Blending Competencies into Course Design—What’s in Your Recipe?

Vicki Mason, Lynette Savage, and Christopher Nelson, University of Providence
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In an era of academic scrutiny and escalating student debt, it is critical that academic programs meet industry needs. Employers want graduates who can demonstrate workplace competencies and career readiness. Directors of our Pharmacy Tech Certificate, BSHA, MHA, and MSN programs, reached out to stakeholders and authoritative leadership in their respective disciplines to identify workplace competencies for career readiness. We started with a base of outcomes, blended in competencies, added dashes of spicy assignments and folded in individual student learning plans within the LMS. We developed this with no outside resources within our existing LMS. We believe that other schools have the opportunity to cost-effectively leverage their LMSs to accomplish the same outcomes. Join us as we share what we have cooked up and participate in recipe sharing ideas! Takeaways from our menu include “Are we designing courses from an academic perspective or with stakeholder and industry input? Do too many cooks really spoil the broth?” and “Do we need a new set of recipes in course development?” While this is a healthcare example, this recipe is applicable across academics. Bon appétit!


Continuous Improvement: Systems Thinking in Instructional Design and Faculty Development

Elizabeth Becker, Khalifa Alshaya, and Jenny Reichart, University of North Dakota
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Due to seasonal flooding and a contingency plan already in place, the University of North Dakota was better prepared than many colleges and universities when COVID-19 forced higher education to resort to rapid remote instruction. However, there is always room for continuous improvement. Using a systems thinking model, UND’s Teaching Transformation and Development Academy aligned online teaching goals with course preparation, migrating over 200 courses online in its first wave. This course preparation operation was highlighted by a new strategic collaboration between Instructional Design and Faculty Development, resulting in new evaluation rubrics for online courses, self-care sessions for faculty, and intercession courses for students. This session will illuminate how a process designed for continuous improvement of online courses and online instructors resulted in reevaluation and strengthening of the academy itself and its best practices in supporting faculty teaching online.


CUREs Impart Career Ready Skills Needed in the American Workforce

Jacqueline McLaughlin, Penn State University – Lehigh Valley and Josh Slee, DeSales University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

A survey of U.S. employers on the learning outcomes that they consider most important for college graduates to succeed in today’s economy was published by Hart Research Associates on behalf of the AAC&U. The report revealed the top six learning outcomes: oral communication, working in teams, written communication, ethical judgment and decision-making, critical thinking, and applying knowledge and skills to the real world. More than 80 percent of U.S. employers expected students to have these specific “workforce skills.” A novel CURE was utilized for lab instruction in cell biology courses over a three-year period at two different institutions and was assessed using a mixed-methods approach. Data suggest that CUREs are a viable solution to training undergraduates in both discipline-specific hard skills and essential workforce soft skills needed to succeed in today’s STEM workforce.


Designing a Course Around Career Readiness

Rachel Smydra, Oakland University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

As the primary architects of curriculum, faculty are largely responsible for creating courses that foster learning outcomes. Given the cost of higher education and the amount of debt students incur, higher education stakeholders have become more concerned about the investment and value of a college education. In reaction, university leaders have been promoting student career preparedness through career-readiness initiatives. However, for most faculty in the humanities, the idea of connecting content or activities to career readiness or helping students articulate the value of the degrees or their skills fails to align with the culture of their disciplines. Adopting a process that includes mapping course design elements to desired outcomes, along with building clear connections between knowledge and activities, can assist faculty in facilitating career readiness.


From Keats to Beats

Miranda Krogstad, YYSpeak
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Poetry can be a tough sell to students who would rather be on Instagram or listening to the top 40. But what if they didn’t have to choose between the two? What if Instagram poets and chart-topping hits were studied alongside sonnets and haikus? What if it were less about teaching kids how to write poetry and more about learning the limitless styles there are to choose from? Whatever the style or personality of the student, this session explores how to create a versatile and open-ended poetry unit that allows these young poets to find their voice.


Service-Learning Course Design Strategies

Julie Turner, Lindenwood University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

So, you’ve determined that integrated service learning into your course makes sense. What next? Learn how to develop a course syllabus utilizing service learning, structure meaningful service-learning activities and outcomes, and articulate expectations with community partners and students. Best practice examples and a “tool kit” for each participant will be included.


4-Step Curricular Alignment: Course Design for Competency-based Education

Karen Gordes and Violet Kulo, University of Maryland Baltimore
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

This mentor session will provide emerging faculty with an easy how-to framework for verifying curricular alignment of their courses. The 4-step process is grounded in the principles of competency-based education and backward curricular design. The first two steps will train faculty how to effectively evaluate if their learning objectives and assessments align with both course and program learning outcomes. Steps three and four will provide verification that course materials meet established accreditation standards and represent a longitudinal progression of learner competency, both of which are essential requirements of most health professions educational programs.


Blended Learning Design with Agile Time Boxes: An Agile Learning Environment

Sarah Khan, Yan Shen, and Jakia Salam, North Carolina State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

We will present our design of a large blended learning (BL) course for Information Technology (IT) education. Based on the first principles of instruction and agile project management, we organized weekly learning into three phased sprint cycles: Phase 1: 4-Day Online Learning, as the planning phase, provides multimedia materials of basic concepts and models problem solving using IT. Phase 2: 1-Day In-Class Learning, as the execution phase engaging students in solving a real-world problem facilitated by instructor guidance. Phase 3: 2-Day After-Class Learning, as the post execution phase encourages students to integrate online and in-class learning by organizing notes and solving transfer problems. BL designed with problem-centered principles and time/process management strategies can enhance learning effectiveness and motivation. It also allows easy adaptation to BL environment and transition to fully online learning.



Topical Area 2: Assessing Learning

Invited Session

Improving the Quality of Selected-Response Questions

Rebecca Orr, professor, Collin College

Well written selected-response questions are a staple of assessment, both in the online and face-to-face classroom. However, it is challenging to write these questions such that they accurately assess our students’ mastery of our learning objectives. Further, submission and grading of open response questions are incredibly time consuming in the online classroom. How can we convert open-response questions to selected-response questions while still measuring higher order thinking skills? This session will review some common mistakes that faculty make when writing these types of questions and review psychometric guidelines for writing effective selected-response questions. This opportunity will allow attendees to work in small groups to identify and correct mistakes in selected-response questions and write their own selected-response items using an item writing checklist. Participants are encouraged to bring their own selected-response and open-response test questions to review and correct, but sample questions will be available. Participants will walk away with a peer-reviewed checklist of best practices for writing selected response items prepared by assessment experts that they can put into practice immediately following the session.


Invited Session

Stop Grading! But what about COVID??

Melissa Michael, associate professor, John Brown University

“What’s my grade?” This is often the question that students are interested in. Research shows that when students are given a grade, they can do little else besides compare it to others. They do not see the grade as an indicator of their learning. Rather than grades, students need formative feedback that allows them to reflect on and assess their learning. But how can we do this amid COVID restrictions? This session highlights my initial journey with grading and feedback, how I eliminated grades from homework and quizzes and allowed time in class for students to reflect on my comments, and then tried to implement these ideas with COVID limitations. Session participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the research, their own grading practices, and develop ideas for changes within the new world of COVID.


Assessing Indigenous Studies Courses

Meredith James, Eastern Connecticut State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

How does Indigenous Studies intersect with formal Western traditions of assessment, specifically in higher education, and how can we use formal assessment to create decolonial spaces? For my courses in Indigenous Studies, I have created formative assessment exercises as hopefully tools of decolonization, creating spaces that privilege Indigenous ways of knowing, in light of the ever-increasing demands for assessment data from institutions. My students actively question and reflect on not only the course content and their participation, but also on how they can take knowledge and skills to their communities and future careers (education, governance, STEM, social work, etc.).


Assessment for Learning: Formative, Fast, and Fun Interdisciplinary Strategies

Ashley Cherry and Jana Anderson, Lubbock Christian University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

We know that feedback is crucial to improve learning, yet research suggests that it is the timing of the feedback and the ability to act upon the feedback that brings about the most learning gains. However, in higher education, we often rely upon high stakes summative assessment strategies (tests, papers) as our primary feedback tools; these traditional assessment strategies provide little or no opportunity for the professor or the student to act upon misunderstandings or gaps in knowledge. This interactive session will focus on formative, fast, frugal, and fun strategies that we can use every day in our classrooms to more effectively assess understanding and foster deeper learning.


Assessment, Alignment, Authenticity: How to Make Assessment a Learning Strategy

Cindy Decker Raynak and Cheryl Farren Tkacs, Penn State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Has the specter of academic integrity become more critical in this environment of remote instruction? Focusing on the actual learning with mixed-mode, online, or in-the-classroom assessments, you can both measure learning with integrity and provide your students with a meaningful learning activity. Your assessments can, and should, have a lasting impact on what your students learn when you start with what counts as evidence and that they have met your learning objectives. Creating assessment strategies that align with those learning objectives will, as a result, have the potential to lower the incidence of cheating attributed to student perception of unfair tests, poor study skills, or test anxiety. In this interactive presentation you’ll practice and reflect on how to do that efficiently by using tech tools and assessment strategies that collect and measure that evidence. In addition, we will discuss the concerns of academic integrity in assessment that seems to drive so much of how we evaluate students.


Lessons Learned: Curriculum Map as an Assessment Tool

Paul Antonellis, Endicott College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

During this session, participants will learn about the steps taken to use curriculum mapping as an assessment tool, what worked well, challenges encountered, and recommendations going forward at the graduate and undergraduate level. The session demonstrates how the program curriculum map can be linked to the general educational outcomes and aligned with intuitional outcomes (Banta, 2014; Hundley & Kahn, 2019). Participants will learn the importance of using a curriculum map as an assessment tool and lessons learned from using this practice.


Specifications Grading: A Motivational Assessment Strategy that Benefits Learners and Faculty

Deidre Meiggs, Paula Billups and Mitch Ferguson, Life University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Are you looking for creative ideas to increase the motivation of learners in your courses and encourage them to achieve higher quality work? Are you seeking ways to enhance content retention by incorporating diverse assessment strategies in your courses? Specifications grading is an assessment model that blends elements of pass-fail grading, competency-based education, and contract grading to assist faculty in achieving these goals. This session will introduce the details of what a spec grading assessment model is and the vast potential it offers. To encourage and facilitate the successful application of this knowledge following this session, three faculty from varied disciplines will highlight the successes and challenges they faced when each uniquely and successfully incorporated this assessment model into their courses. A data comparison versus previously utilized assessment strategies will also be included.


Ten Tricks to Reduce Cheating on Your Online Exams

Alym Amlani and John Shepherd, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Are you finding it hard to create exams that fairly measure student learning and deter cheating? Are you finding it difficult to create exams that are rigorous, fair, and consistent? In this talk, we’ll explain how to develop a collaborative test bank that will allow you to create exams that ensure students are tested on the same learning outcomes and at the same level of difficulty. Using this approach, we’ll describe how to link your exam questions to specific learning objectives and a process by which faculty can collaborate in creating these questions. We will also discuss how to integrate exam performance data to systematically improve and refine the exam test bank. We will explore metrics such as question discrimination, difficulty, grammar, and structure.


Using Universal Design and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy to Reimagine Assessments

Meghan Owenz and Red Yuan, Penn State University, Berks
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

How can you motivate your students to read and review notes on a weekly basis? Multiple-choice quizzes are the most common assessment tool utilized to check student understanding of their learning. By nature of the structure of this assessment, some students perform poorly despite understanding of the material. Combining Universal Design for Learning with Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy (CSP), we aimed to improve learning outcomes for all students by focusing on students who have been marginalized by standard assessment methods. The session begins with a discussion of applying principles of Universal Design for Learning to assessment design and providing alternatives to traditional assessment measures. Next, we will analyze the influence of test anxiety on test performance based on our research. Finally, we will present an assessment option which can be adapted for virtually any field. Results and student perceptions of the alternative assessment model will be presented.


Formative Assessment is a Verb

Patricia Boatwright, Francis Marion University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Formative assessment is the single most important thing teachers can do for their students. Formative assessment should be thought of as a verb, not a noun. It should be used during class to drive instruction. Formative assessments gather critical information to elicit understanding during instruction. These high-quality interactions include questioning, classroom discussions, exit tickets, and reflective journals. Having a variety of formative assessment approaches allows teachers and professors to measure and assess and document student achievement. In this presentation, you will learn how to successfully implement a variety of powerful formative assessment strategies that also engage your students in any classroom.



Topical Area 3: Student Engagement

Invited Session

Transforming Classroom Culture

Liz Norell, associate professor, Chattanooga State Community College

No matter the format of your class (in-person, virtual, online) you’ve probably struggled with students who aren’t engaged, awkward silences, or energy-sapping class sessions. The most rewarding teaching often comes when a group of students just ‘clicks,’ when you can sense that students are as invested in the learning as you are. But how to create that? This session explains how to bring greater presence / awareness to the classroom as a teacher, and why doing so will boost the presence / engagement of your students. We’ll explore tools for cultivating presence, such as meditation and the Enneagram, engaging in some self-discovery to boost your understanding of what you bring into the classroom. Then, we’ll learn specific techniques to create a more engaging, positive, supportive classroom culture. Ultimately, by creating more heart-centered classroom cultures, we have the power to transform the culture of higher education itself–something that is, frankly, desperately needed.


Fostering Engaged Participation to Promote Relevant and Rigorous Learning

Rebecca Haslam, Rebecca Wigglesworth, Claudine Bedell, Amy Knight, and Amy Saks Pavese, Saint Michael’s College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

This session will outline a program-wide and multi-faceted approach to engagement using multiple examples from a collaboratively designed Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program. Presenters will share their design process, including specific engagement strategies used to promote relevant and rigorous learning both in-person and remotely. Through reflecting on their practice, participating in interactive opportunities, and exploring connections to theory, participants will develop their own plan for deepening engagement at both the program and classroom level. Learn how to develop a cohort community that fosters emotional engagement; nurture faculty collaboration that is mission-driven to model behavioral engagement; and design program-wide curriculum focused on relevance, agency, inquiry, and active learning to promote cognitive engagement.


Creating Community to Engage, Excite, and Retain Undergraduates

Becky Carmichael and Zakiya Wilson-Kennedy, Louisiana State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Successful freshman seminars require multifaceted community structures to engage students in the discipline, build connections to experts and alumni, and solidify their sense of belonging. In this session, we’ll share a scaffolded model for team projects that enables students to connect content knowledge with higher-order skills, test collaboration strategies, engage with various communities, and participate in discipline-based activities relevant to building agency in learners’ intended fields. With a focus on freshman seminars, this model also serves to actively engage, onboard, and retain learners within the discipline. We’ll unpack the key strategies for cultivating student agency and belonging, and you’ll experience the activities we’ve used to foster relationships, engagement, and connections among multiple communities (i.e., peer-peer, instructor-student, staff-student).


Engage Your Students: Learning Through Meaningful Lessons

Sam Buemi, Northcentral Technical College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Learning should be meaningful to all students. When it is not, students can walk away from the course feeling annoyed. Educators find it challenging to balance content with engagement. Too much lecture can be overwhelming for the student. Too much engagement or involvement can lead to students feeling exhausted. While an even balance between lecture and engagement is necessary, these teaching and learning styles leave out the most crucial teaching method: making content relevant. This session will discuss the importance of relevance, how to recognize when it is or isn’t occurring in the classroom, and ways you can enhance your courses with relevancy.


Engaging Students in a Hybrid Classroom

Heather Gilmour and Julie Wienski, Springfield College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Given the response within higher education to move to more remote and hybrid classroom settings due to restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, this session will address ways to engage students within a hybrid classroom (half the class learns synchronously via Zoom, while the other half learns face-to-face). Strategies used for student engagement within a first-year course will be discussed, including in-class activities, Zoom features and tools, as well as content delivery and real-time assessment strategies.


More Heads Are Better Than One: Collaboration in Online Courses

Laurie Bobley and Alan Sebel, Touro College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

It can be challenging for faculty to design and facilitate collaborative activities in asynchronous online courses. Data related to student experiences in collaborative online activities will be presented. Participants will examine a current assignment normally completed individually and consider its applicability as a collaborative project in an online or blended course. Through interactive discussion participants will be able to share ideas from their own practice. Participants will: identify how and when to use collaborative assignments in place of an individual assignment in an online course; apply best practices to develop an online collaborative activity; select an assignment from a current course that can be converted to a collaborative project; and identify the technological tools that will facilitate collaboration in an online setting.


Online Discussion Strategies to Promote a Sense of Community

Jackie Murphy, Kay Swartzwelder, Shauna Roch, Joanne Serembus, Drexel University; Shannon Maheu, Fanshawe College; Leland (Rocky) Rockstraw, UNLV; and Alyssa Leggieri, Pennsylvania College of the Health Sciences
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Creating an engaging online course, where students feel part of an online community, can be challenging even for the most experienced online educator. Online discussions are a common tool used to connect students in online courses but often limited to text-based posts. This international research study compared the use of text-based versus video-based discussions in online courses to ascertain students’ perceptions of social presence. A mixed-methods design was utilized to evaluate students’ perceptions. The results showed that while students preferred text-based discussions to video-based, students perceived more social presence using video-based discussions. Two important take-aways from this study are: Faculty should use differentiated assessment in their classrooms—it is evident through this research that not every student expresses themselves best in writing or verbally; and clear expectations are required for video discussions to ensure students are comfortable. During this presentation, we will share strategies to successfully implement video discussions into online learning based on what was learned in this research study. These strategies can be utilized by faculty in all disciplines and will apply to both online courses and traditional face-to-face courses that need to be moved online.


Practical Strategies to Promote Student Engagement and Active Learning

Amanda Bock and Robin Vincent, William Peace University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

This session focuses on practical strategies to promote emotional, behavioral, and cognitive engagement in the college classroom. Research shows that active learning is superior to passive learning; it results in deeper understanding of content, greater retention of information, and higher levels of thinking. Fostering active engagement and total participation improves instructional quality, student learning, and student satisfaction with a course. Participants will learn specific strategies to engage all students during class time. Participants will understand the rationale behind each strategy and will briefly experience each strategy presented. Presenters will model instructional strategies both with and without the use of technology tools. By the end of this session, participants will be able to design a lesson that incorporates multiple strategies to maximize student engagement.


Providing Reflective Feedback to Support Student Growth

Mary Muhs, Rasmussen College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Providing feedback to students can often feel like a chore instead of a valuable learning opportunity for both faculty and students. It can be hard to build relationships with students where they see your feedback as helpful or transformative, especially when they only review it online. Using Reflective Consultation (Feedback), a tool grounded in the infant mental health field and early education, to create a learning partnership, participants will have an opportunity to rethink the way they offer feedback on student work and engagement. Participants will explore the basics of Reflective Supervision (Feedback) including the essential qualities needed for the relationship, essential elements and collaborative tasks to effectively engage in the conversations, and how to adapt your practices to in-person, virtual and written feedback.


Seven Strategies for Embracing the Emotional Labor of Teaching

Ashley Harvey, Colorado State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In this session, we will explore the invisible emotional labor associated with online and in-person teaching at the college level and focus on seven emotion-regulation strategies and mindsets for college instructors drawn from education frameworks. Attendees will describe their emotional labor, examine their own attitudes towards students’ challenging behavior, explore what “pushes their buttons,” and identify helpful reframes for hard moments with students. The goal of this session is to help academic instructors increase their experience of genuine, positive emotion, so that they can enjoy teaching more, as well as successfully engage students and promote their success.


Increasing Student Engagement Through the Use of Engagement Rubrics

Melissa Schettler, William Penn University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In a time when it is increasingly more challenging to maintain students’ attention due to distractions from electronics and shortened attention spans, it is crucial that faculty pivot in their instructional approaches to provide highly engaging instruction that requires active participation from the learner. This presentation will ask participants to reflect on the specific criteria they are looking for during class that will guide them in creating a rubric for Student Engagement. The professor will identify key areas of engagement that are important in their individual classrooms and the criteria that demonstrate to students how to achieve a high level of student engagement in each given key area.


Is Anybody There? Increasing Online Instructor Presence Using Customized Announcements

Jessica Hilton, Logan University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Perceived instructor presence leads to more student engagement and success. Inadequate instructor presence and low levels of student engagement are common criticisms of the online learning environment. Instructors typically address these concerns by using weekly written or video announcements. However, announcements are only effective if students read or view them. Applying a Community of Inquiry Framework (CoIF) as described by Pollard et al. (2014) can increase the likelihood that students will read/view announcements by providing timely information that students will perceive as relevant, are directly related to the course content, and are constructed in a way that conveys the instructor cares about student success. This ultimately leads to an increased perception of instructor presence and engagement by students, and a better online experience for all.


Promotion of Situated Learning through the Real-World-Ready Experience

Lu Yuan, Southeastern Louisiana University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

The Real-World Ready (RWR) initiative at Southeastern Louisiana University was designed to prepare students for a professional life after academics by providing authentic learning opportunities that connect academic courses with real-world experience. OSHE 382 Construction Safety was approved as a RWR class each time when it was taught from 2016 to 2020. The select construction companies provided situated learning opportunities to the students for their final project. The students conducted quantitative and qualitative analyses on the assigned topics/issues and presented the study in both oral and written forms. This session will share the experience of collaboration between academia and industry, especially on how to create the situated learning opportunities for students. The evaluation of students’ performance as well as the feedback from them and the industrial partners will be discussed.


Using Side Quests and XP to Improve Student Engagement

Andrew Davies, Virginia Commonwealth University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Imagine students coming into class not just prepared, but excited about what they’re about to learn. They’re eager to participate and even motivated to do extra work. This level of student engagement is possible with the help of some well-designed side quests—optional assignments used to amplify the positive effects of your in-class activities. Using lessons gleaned from implementing them in my own classes, participants of this session will learn how to incorporate optional assignments into their lesson plan in a way that improves student engagement;  how these challenges can get students to explore the subject area on their own beyond what’s covered in class; how to structure a reward system that incentivizes participation without undermining intrinsic motivation; and  how the reward system can be expanded to encourage students’ to adopt desirable learning behaviors.


Utilizing “Mastermind” Groups to Foster Peer-to-Peer Collaboration, Learning, and Engagement

Adam Owenz, Albright College
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

When tasking students with challenging individual assignments, a bifurcated duality between the “best and brightest” and “the rest” often presents itself. Peer-to-peer collaboration is an often-overlooked resource for learning that can close that gap and provide enhanced educational experiences for both students who default to the leadership/tutor role and those who default to the tutee role. This presentation provides an overview of how to implement a common tech startup peer-to-peer mentoring concept called mastermind groups into an undergraduate college course. This presentation also provides practical dos and don’ts as well as actual student pre- and post-survey results. Attendees will leave this presentation with a solid understanding of the concept and a foundational understanding of how to implement mastermind groups in classes across all disciplines.



Topical Area 4: Technology Tools for Teaching

Invited Session

Using Microsoft Tools to Enhance Student Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration

Anita Morgan, senior lecturer, Indiana University, Bloomington

This presentation will demonstrate how to use some common MS tools (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) and some not-so-common MS tools (SharePoint, Stream, Forms) to encourage and assess active learning. The demonstration includes how to organize the tools and enhance interaction using MS Teams. During the presentation you will learn how to use Microsoft tools to organize your course for enhanced engagement, encourage and monitor student collaboration, and enhance student-student and student-instructor interaction.


Enhancing Student Engagement with PlayPosit, while Improving Assessment Practices

Melinda M Livas, University of California, Davis
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

COVID-19 changed the landscape of remote teaching and instructors spent most of 2020 creating dynamic instructional content, (i.e., videos, and podcasts) to supplement online instruction. Creating dynamic instructional content takes time and incorporating an assessment element to gauge learning can be tricky. That’s where PlayPosit comes in. PlayPosit is an interactive video platform that embeds active learning experiences within a video called “bulbs”. PlayPosit not only creates an active learning experience that engages the learner, it also provides analytics for learning assessment improvement. After attending this session, attendees will be able to: demonstrate how to successfully upload a video (i.e., bulb) into PlayPosit; create a variety of interactions within each bulb; and publish bulbs and sync into Canvas for grading.


Extending Reality: Creating Augmented and Virtual Spaces in the Classroom

Shadow Armfield, Northern Arizona University and Dawn Armfield, Minnesota State University, Mankato
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

In this session, participants will be introduced to the broad idea of Extended Reality. Presenters will define and demonstrate extended reality spaces including augmented and virtual reality. The presenters will begin with a demonstration of how these ideas/tools can be used to support both teaching and learning in the university classroom. From here, the presentation will move into a hands-on “workshop” where the participants can experiment with these spaces and think through how they can be used to create activities where students demonstrate mastery of the content in the courses they teach. The presenters will demonstrate and encourage the use of five unique tools (mostly free) to support the participants and their students in getting started in using extended realities in their courses.


From Isolation to Presence: Six Tips to Enhance Online Learning

Joan Bowman and Neva Cramer, Schreiner University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Learn how to use online tools to revamp your online communication, interaction, and student engagement. In this session, you will glean ideas for creating more interactive lessons, examples of how lead your students to interact with each other, and there will be opportunities for you to demonstrate your creativity in these areas. With the guidance from their presenters, attendees will spend time during this session on their devices developing and practicing the new learning. Session attendees will be able to revamp online professor/student communication to strengthen relationships; use Flipgrid, Padlet, and Zoom to differentiate assignments and learning; and include small, bite size changes in lessons that will game-change student engagement.


Pedagogical Video Integration to Increase Efficacy, Efficiency, and Engagement

Robb Beane, William Penn University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

The changes to teaching and learning in the age of a global pandemic have been swift and abrupt. Navigation of how to improve the efficacy and efficiency of the teaching practice is dependent upon acceptance and mastery of a number of technical skills that have been perceived as extra prior to the necessity of scheduling changes at colleges and universities all across the globe. Knowledge of how to create, share, and utilize video to raise the level of engagement with both professor and content can be accomplished with only a few applications and a deeper understanding of instructional pedagogy. Where is the time to discover and learn about these applications and their pedagogical importance? With knowledge of where to look, the programs to use, and basic knowledge of how to use them, instructional integration of video can be done with fidelity. This presentation will cover the what, why, and how of creating and using video to enhance teaching and learning. Attendees will gain knowledge on the pedagogy of video use and find out why it is beneficial, what good quality video is, and how to both create and share instructor created video.


The Point of PowerPoint Is to Use All Its Power

Mick Charney, Kansas State University – Department of Architecture
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

PowerPoint presentations are important, even crucial, centerpieces of pedagogy for those instructors who strive to maximize learning outcomes with multimedia. And yet, many well-intentioned, educator-generated lists of PowerPoint “dos-and-don’ts” are so proscriptive as to discourage the fullest exploration of all its bells and whistles. On the other hand, both the intentions of PowerPoint’s inventors and the findings of brain science researchers affirm that the intentional use of PowerPoint’s elaborative capabilities actually improves student performance. In short, beyond standard PowerPoint templates and text-heavy bullet points, images and animations garner huge cognitive gains. Session participants will learn how to critique PowerPoints through the lens of its inventors’ intentions, what differentiates effective from ineffectual pedagogical use of PowerPoint, and how the brain processes the several different types of elaborated media.


The Pressbook’s the Thing: Implementing OER in Theater History

Teresa Focarile and Monica Brown, Boise State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

While it has been demonstrated that the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) can improve educational outcomes for students, it can often be difficult to implement due to a variety of technical barriers (including the accessibility of editing original files and sharing curated materials). This session will introduce participants to Pressbooks, an innovative and easy to use online tool for creating OER textbooks, and the process of using it to create a play anthology for an online theater history course using materials from the public domain. Through a discussion of a grant funded project that leveraged staff and faculty collaboration, presenters will share the process they used to collaborate on creating this OER textbook. Participants will consider how they could use this technology in their own contexts and identify methods and processes for implementing public domain content in the development of OER and ensuring its accessibility.


Zoom in the Active Learning Classroom: Untether the learning

Karl Carrigan and Marc Ebenfield, University of New England
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Shifting rapidly to a remote learning environment inspired creativity that we can use well after the pandemic ends. This session will feature techniques used to enable active learning in hyflex & blendsync environments. We utilized the Zoom videoconferencing program to allow faculty members to push content to student devices, record an active learning class, while transitioning from micro lecture to active exercises to think-pair-share and more involved case studies. By signing into Zoom with a second device, iPad, or smartphone, we present content wirelessly, annotate, and record lecture portions of the class, and easily move about the space to support active learning techniques. We will demonstrate our methods, discuss the background theory and practice, and invite participants to follow our lead. These techniques can be used in the future to promote hyflex environments or for a variety of student accommodations and making single display classrooms more conducive to group work.



Topical Area 5: Online Teaching and Learning

Advisory Board Session

Being BRIEF: How to Capture the Virtual Learners’ Attention

LaQue Thornton Perkins, assistant professor, Saint Leo University

The National Center for Education Statistics suggests that three quarters of all undergraduate students are “non-traditional” (Oblinger, July/August 2003, p. 37). Non-traditional students are generally identified as adult students 25 and older, who work full-time and attend college part-time (Houser, 2005; Quiggins et al., 2016). Additionally, studies show that because of personal and professional obligations—such as family, careers, and social commitments—nontraditional students spend less time interacting with their professors and peers than their traditional classmates (Lundberg, 2003; Quiggins et al., 2016). Nontraditional students not only struggle to find time to engage in activities outside of class, but they are also restricted in the amount of time that they can attend class or even pay attention while they are there. As a result, it is imperative that these students maximize the classroom (virtual) experience, by making the most of their time while they are in your presence. This presentation will provide a model that instructors can implement in order to help today’s students meet the unique challenges of our time. At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will have a template for attracting and keeping adult students’ attention, increasing their comprehension, and motivating them to action in a blended environment.


Invited Session

Using Online Tools and Learning Science to Spark Curiosity and Amplify Learning

Jane Sutterlin, learning designer, Penn State University

Curiosity is defined as having a strong desire to learn or know something. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if all our students had this level of curiosity about our subject matter? Curiosity can lead to increased knowledge and help students make connections among various pieces of information. So how can we create an environment where students are curious to learn more? In this session, I will provide a concise overview of best practices for teaching and learning, as framed by the field of cognitive science. Participants will take part in practical teaching strategies that can be implemented in the classroom immediately. The session will focus on the ways that online tools can be used in innovative ways to make teaching more effective and student learning more durable. Participants will leave with a collection of resources that can be implemented immediately, and will be able to integrate activities to spark curiosity in their classroom; use technologies to help students deepen understanding of content; and communicate to students learning strategies to help them take more ownership of their learning.


Adult Learners’ Perceptions of the Online Teaching and Learning Environment

Marsha Black-Chen, The Mico University College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more.

The online learning environment requires a multifaceted approach, especially when consideration is given as to how adult learners should be facilitated—appropriate platform, facilitator presence, feedback and grading, and patterns of engagement are important. The use of authentic activities within the online learning environments have proven to be beneficial to adult learners, and more so, the self-directed path that is created. A constructivist approach along with the online delivery was taken to create a student-centered environment. This session is intended to examine the perceptions adult learners have about online learning in an attempt to illuminate and identify the issues related to the online learning environment.


Collaboration and the Asynchronous Learning Space: Steps for Success

Tanya Allen, Texas Southern University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Collaborative learning experiences can enhance student understanding and foster creativity; however, online asynchronous learning spaces present unique challenges for those experiences, which by design can encourage student isolation in the learning process. In addition, students often dread interdependent activities due to grading processes and past collaborative experiences. Despite the challenges, successful collaborative activities in an online asynchronous course is possible. This session will focus on three main areas important to online success: the learning environment, incremental collaborative opportunities, and group project necessities. Best practices from each area will be discussed and post-secondary instructors will have suggestions for improving instruction to better engage and facilitate students’ learning in a collaborative and effective way.


Course-embedded Advising and Preparation for Social Justice Work

Donna DiMatteo-Gibson, Michelle Dennis, James Halbert, Dawgelene Sangster, Irene Jones, and Desanka Djonin, Adler University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

This research focuses on applications of course-embedded advising with relevance to student preparation to engage in social justice work. Course embedded advising involves the exploration of structured prompts during individual student-faculty meetings. The prompts are aligned to course objectives to ensure cohesion. Course-embedded advising has been delivered through the online graduate program, which serves as the basis of this evaluation for a period of 4 years. Following the session, participants will be able to: appraise the utility of course-embedded advising from an academic leadership perspective; assess various applications of course-embedded advising in online courses; evaluate the cultivation of student engagement through course-embedded advising; and analyze opportunities for self-preparation prior to engagement in social justice work.


Dynamic Synchronous Courses: Strategies to Engage Online Students

Cara Gomez, Delaware State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Have you asked a question during a synchronous online course and just stared at black squares awkwardly and counted the seconds without a response? Active learning has been shown to improve student engagement, memory, and knowledge. It can be a challenge, though, to implement some of the pedagogical strategies used in traditional face-to-face classes in a synchronous online course. However, there are many ways to effectively engage learners. This session will demonstrate how to create a class culture that promotes student involvement; strategies to keep students’ attention while delivering content; and examples of how to execute active learning strategies in a synchronous class format. Participants will walk away with numerous strategies to make their synchronous online classes dynamic and engaging.


Hyflex Model through the Community of Inquiry Lens: A Focus on Special Needs

Tiffany Mulally and Roberta Yeager, Misericordia University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

With the changes that our educational system face due to the pandemic, a reexamination of education for those students with special needs must be initiated. The presenters have examined the benefits of using a Hyflex model to meet the needs of the exceptional student now and after the pandemic. Educators can increase the student’s success through online course development tailored to each student’s needs and the ability to move between a face-to-face and online class. Using the Community of Inquiry framework, the educator can ensure all of the student’s needs are being met through teaching, social, and cognitive presence.


Increasing Inclusivity in the Online Classroom

Jo Anne Durovich and Amy Poland, St. Joseph’s College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Online education opens pathways to higher education not previously available to many students. Educators must respond to this diversity by developing innovative strategies and by seeking student feedback regarding how best to create inclusive online environments in our classes. The presenters examine data collected through course evaluations and focus groups with recent graduates of online programs. The presentation focuses on student self-reports of their experiences in online programs, and with inclusivity specifically, and will discuss experiences since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The presenters will examine opportunities for growth based on student suggestions for future academic programming and suggest best practices for creating a welcoming online environment in the classroom. This presentation will make suggestions based upon student feedback regarding how to foster student success and increase the inclusivity of online programming with regard to diverse student learning needs.


Online Teaching: The Balancing Act of Synchronous and Asynchronous Delivery

David Betancourt, Cerritos College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Synchronous and Asynchronous Delivery have benefits and challenges. This session will provide an opportunity to reflect on the benefits and challenges of each delivery method while also compiling best practices. Time will be dedicated to searching out the optimum balance between the methods that empowers faculty with the ability to best serve student needs in a virtual platform. After attending this session, participants will be able to identify synchronous and asynchronous delivery models; identify benefits and challenges of synchronous and asynchronous delivery models; and develop a plan to implement a teaching strategy based on a synchronous or asynchronous delivery practice.


Recipe for Engagement: Connection Strategies that Work

Hope Nordstrom and Julia Osteen, Lipscomb University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

In today’s society, connectedness and relationships are important for students’ learning experiences. Online instructors may be tempted to think it is too challenging to fully engage all of their students. How can instructors maximize the power of best practices in order to whet their students’ appetites and keep them coming back for more? In this interactive session, we will peruse the student engagement buffet and sample a collection of strategies just right for cultivating your online course. We will start with an “appetizer” of research foundations, move to an “entree” of best practices, and end with a sweet “dessert” application to our own online courses. Participants will walk away with robust “ingredients” that can be implemented immediately to help them become Master Chefs of Student Engagement.


Using Mini-Lectures to Increase Social Presence and Online Engagement

Meghan Owenz and Mary Ann Mengel, Penn State University, Berks
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

This presentation explores the impact of design decisions related to instructor presence in instructional videos in an online course. We investigate the impact on learners’ sense of social capital and their perceived enjoyment of the online class. In tandem with instructor presence, we complement our design approach with use of visual signaling to focus learners’ attention on key takeaways in the narrative. Using principles of multimedia design, we present information in both visual and auditory modalities with a goal of reducing cognitive load. The presenters will share their easy, efficient workflow for faculty to produce online instructor-led mini-lecture videos. We will review feedback from students in an online courses, video analytics, sample videos, related research, design decisions, and best practices for pursuing a similar approach. Attendees will be engaged in small group discussions and reflection points throughout the presentation.


Virtual Labs

Brenda Orazietti and Sarah Evans, York University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

How would a professor approach transforming a course that is heavily seated in face-to-face, hands-on praxis in the lab setting into a meaningful virtual course? Considering changes necessitated by the Covid-19 pandemic, the laboratory and all lecture halls were closed and not accessible. Therefore, faculty had to quickly learn to revise their teaching methods to teaching their courses on-line. This required careful planning, thinking, and strategy. Creativity, innovation and methods to engage students were top priorities. In this session, we will share our methods of approaching these challenges and flip your labs into a pleasant and rich learning environment.


Goals for Success: Setting Goals in the Online Environment

Mariah Kramer, Barker Central School District; Sheila Majask, Greg Wojt, Chippewa Valley Central Schools; and Raymond Francis, Central Michigan University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

With the increase in online learning options for higher education in the past several years, there is an increased need for effective strategies for learner retention and student achievement. Research into self-regulating behaviors such as autonomy and self-efficacy shows that goal setting has a positive impact on student achievement, course completion, and learning satisfaction, leading to an increase in learner retention and student achievement. This presentation will cover different goal categories and which types lead to the most success with students. Strategies for setting goals with students to increase motivation will be provided. Connections will be made between goal-setting and self-regulated learning in the online learning environment.


How to Best Utilize Lecture Recordings in Online Courses

Jessica Bailey, Reach Cyber Charter School; Erin Bosch-Hannah, Deonna Davis, Michigan State University; Ray Francis, Central Michigan University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Online student learning is becoming more prevalent and by reviewing ways to include more interactivity in lecture recordings educators can reach students in new ways. Video is more effective to motivate students when instructors consider how to manage cognitive load, maximize student engagement, and promote active learning (Brame, 2016). Some recommendations that can move students toward desired learning outcomes with the use of video lectures include keeping videos short, projecting personality, and including interactivity, which allows students to take control of their learning.


Meet Them Where They Are!

Mary Wiseman, Springfield Technical Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Hispanic and Latinx community college students, especially those attending Hispanic Serving Institutions, deserve to see themselves reflected in their course content. Improving the process of online course design, including the implementation of best practices specifically created for this marginalized group’s academic success, will allow faculty to meet their students where they are. Examining the best practices for online course design so this student demographic sees themselves in their course content is something any faculty has the potential to achieve. Faculty have an inside position to create social justice change and if faculty aren’t practicing cultural humility and anti-racism and designing these concepts into their curriculum and pedagogy they are part of the systemic problem.


Small Nonverbals that have BIG impacts on our Teaching Efficacy

Rebecca Burdette and David “Boz” Bowles, Louisiana State University (LSU)
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Live online synchronous classes are a unique teaching medium, which means we often need specific but novel communication techniques to teach, facilitate, interact, and present within this realm. While some of the same traditional approaches we use to effectively communicate within the physical classroom are still applicable to the virtual one, there are additional techniques we should consider when teaching synchronously online. In this 20-minute power session, we’ll share our top nonverbal communication tips for bringing energy and instructor presence into the F2F classrooms that also work in the live virtual space and demonstrate a few approaches specific to live video conferencing. Teaching course content is still our primary concern, but how we show up as the instructor has a significant impact on how our students engage with our content behaviorally, emotionally, and cognitively.



Topical Area 6: Teaching Specific Student Populations

Inquiry-Based Teaching Around Essential Questions for Deep, Transformative Learning

Patrick Canning and Emily Manone, Northern Arizona University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

This session is part narrative, part toolkit for faculty looking to reimagine their courses and/or pedagogy for deeper student learning. It is a story of how small group of faculty overhauled a First Year Seminar (FYS) program to create an experience that would disrupt secondary ways of schooling, inspire curiosity, reframe writing, and make significant commitments to build transferrable critical thinking skills. This session will argue that FYS’s design and facilitation model can build a learning foundation for college success, offer a gateway for interdisciplinary General Studies programs, and speak directly to transferrable skills for a career in a way that is particularly relevant for FirstGen and minoritized students. Participants will gain direction on how to facilitate an inquiry-based first-year course; examples of activities that promote deep learning and critical thinking; and assessment data capturing course impacts.


Culturally Relevant Pedagogy for African American Students

Tarsha Reid, Livingstone College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

A decline of interest in students from underrepresented groups, specifically African American students, is a growing concern. Moreover, the achievement gap between White and African American students continues to be a challenge in higher education. Teachers used their knowledge of culturally relevant pedagogies to connect with the social and cultural background of their students.

Participants will be able to incorporate teaching strategies that will engage and motivate African American students in various subject areas. Participants will understand the learning styles associated with teaching culturally relevant pedagogy.


Perceptions and Experiences of First-Generation College Students: In the Classroom, Field, and Life

Gavin Watts, Theresa Garfield, and Mariya Davis, Texas A&M University – San Antonio
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

This session provides study findings related to the perceptions and experiences of current first- generation college students (FGCS; i.e., first member of their immediate family to attend college), in regards to experiences in higher education classrooms, the field/internships (i.e., early career experiences), and in life (e.g., barriers and supports to higher education). Key takeaways include considerations, practices, and strategies for higher education instructors in supporting FGCS inside and outside of the classroom.


Teaching Engineering and Science Remotely? Successful Tools and Strategies

Ahmad Fayed, Southeastern Louisiana University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In response to restrictions required due to the COVID-19 pandemic, rapid changes have been made to teaching environments. These changes left educators puzzled on how to acheive the same quality onsite education online without losing the social, experiential, and many other dimensions of the learning process. These concerns are very serious in Science, Engineering, and Technology fields. Teaching engineering, science, and technology, in this uncertain environment forced instructors to find innovative ways of delivering the content, keeping the student engaged, and providing the required lab work and hands-on activities. In this presentation, successful strategies and tools applied in engineering classes will be shared. Solutions include integration of online simulation tools, such as TinkerCAD, CS2N, PhET, LabXchange, into class materials and using instant response tools, such as iClicker REEF, to compensate for the components missed due to remote setting. Presentation will include examples and hands-on practice of some of these tools.


Teaching Strategies for Working With College Students With Convicted Parents

Douglas Bates, Winston-Salem State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

The U.S. prison system is the largest in the world even though America only accounts for only 5% of the world’s population. Likewise, more than half of these incarcerated adults have children under the age of 18 which amounts to 2.7 million children who have parents that are incarcerated. Although there is empirical data describing the impact incarcerated parents has on children that are 18 and younger, there is limited research related to college students that have a parent that is currently incarcerated or has been convicted of a crime. The focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of the various effects having a convicted parent or currently incarcerated parent can have on a college student, suggest teaching strategies or techniques for working with this specific population, and explore proposed techniques and innovative ideas for providing a more conducive and comfortable learning environment where this topic can be explored, unpacked and discussed.


Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

AJ Marsden and Nicki Nance, Beacon College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

This session addresses issues that faculty members encounter in a classroom comprised of students with learning differences (LD). These differences may range from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to dyslexia to Autism Spectrum Disorders. Beacon College is designed exclusively for individuals with LDs, and therefore the faculty has a unique perspective in the challenges that one faces in the classroom. The four challenges discussed are attention and engagement; memory; behavioral issues; and mental and emotional disorders. After this session, participants will recognize learning disabilities and developmental deficits in otherwise capable students; differentiate between current developmental norms and individual developmental challenges that impair learning; and be familiar instructional strategies to address each of the four categories of learning challenges presented.


Widening the Admissions Door: A Teacher Education Case Study

Elodie Jones, Betsy Crawford, and Tyra Hayden, Fort Hays State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Participants in this session will explore how this case study investigates multiple undergraduate teacher education candidates struggling to meet the needed requirements to enter an accredited undergraduate Teacher Education program. Individual case study narratives examine potential themes such as entry into a program, numerous students re-taking a standardized assessment to gain entry, and challenging conversations and life decisions with their academic advisor. Beyond accreditation-based admission standards, the session will explain an alternative admissions pilot and evidence that can be utilized for meeting admissions quantifications (i.e., academic achievement, alternative assessment, increasing diverse candidate pool). Any university program with qualified admissions could consider the information shared in this presentation to re-evaluate their admission policies to be fairer and more equitable for all applicants.


Non-Academic Instruction and First-Year Student Success

Benjamin Blood, Northern Pennsylvania Regional College
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

First-year student success courses best serve students when they address non-academic obstacles to success and provide strategies for overcoming them in conjunction with academic skills and strategies for success. This session will discuss the manner in which the non-academic skills of metacognition, time management, self-discipline, resilience and perseverance, and help-seeking have been incorporated into a corequisite support course for English composition in an accelerated learning program model. This session will also provide suggestions for incorporating these strategies into a range of disciplines and first-year student success models.



Topical Area 7: Equity, Diversity, Inclusion

A Practical Model for Supporting Struggling Online Learners with UDL

Denise Harshbarger, Sarah Fulkes, Josh Valk, Bryan Hart, Rosanna Mitchell, Stephanie Laffer, Alexis Walker, and Martha Baumgarten, Independence University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework underscores the importance of faculty attending to learner variability when designing and delivering instruction. When professors are aware of variability and providing instruction that is flexible, all learners can reach their maximum potential. In this session, participants will receive an overview of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Framework and learn how one fully online school has built a model to promote the implementation of this framework in courses. All participants will leave with a step-by-step guide for implementation of this model, practical tips for how to implement each of the three domains of the UDL framework, and specific guidance for implementation in a fully online setting.


Accountability with Compassion: Advising Competencies to Increase Student Success

Shani Fleming and Karen Gordes, University of Maryland Baltimore
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Students enter educational programs with a myriad of characteristics, including cognitive diversity, sociocultural influences, and a variety of competing priorities. Therefore, a “one-size fits all” advising strategy is not a best practice for creating an inclusive and productive learning experience. This session will discuss how to utilize higher education advising models for monitoring, guiding, and enhancing student progress throughout a curriculum. Specifically, we will describe three evidence-based advising models: coaching (“GROW”), appreciative, and proactive and provide examples of how these advising strategies can effectively be used to longitudinally monitor and develop intervention approaches along the continuum of student progression. We will highlight how faculty can use these advising models to balance student professional and academic demands while simultaneously creating an environment of inclusivity for a diverse study population.


Decolonizing Feminist Futures: Pedagogical Interventions During COVID and Beyond

Sherry Zane, Mick Powell, and Lauren Todd, University of Connecticut
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Borrowing from bell hooks’ theory of engaged pedagogies, and Bettina Love’s call for abolitionist teaching praxis, this session will focus on best practices for intentionally creating inclusive classrooms that center the needs, narratives, and experiences of marginalized students. Panelists will discuss their unique approaches to designing and facilitating courses that reshape hierarchical models of teaching through reforming modes of participation, creating dynamic assessments, and applying properties of the Universal Design for Learning. In highlighting our pedagogical interventions, attendees across interdisciplinary fields will be able to re-assess their courses, map out new strategies, and implement innovative techniques for more inclusive classrooms.


Engage in Decreasing the Digital Divide

Samantha Ertenberg and Audrey Antee, Florida State College at Jacksonville
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Before COVID-19 and the major shift to online learning, faculty at Florida State College at Jacksonville were worried about the digital divide which research explains is the result of minority student coming to college with fewer digital skills related to academics and/or less experience with technology in general. We speculate this is a possible reason for almost a 15-percent gap in success between black and white students in our ENC1101: Composition online. To help combat this, professors designed specific, interactive modules using Adobe Captivate and other technologies and embedded them in fully online versions of ENC1101. Come learn about the idea, the development of the modules, and the survey results, and then consider how they might be adapted to decrease the digital divide at your institution.


Including Neurodiverse Students in the College Classroom

Jessica Scher Lisa and Harry Voulgarakis, St. Joseph’s College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

The increasing number of neurodiverse students entering higher education poses an ever-growing challenge for professors. Current literature supports an array of possibilities on how neurodiverse students experience higher education as well as ways in which higher education institutions address the needs of neurodiverse students. There has been consistent evidence that shows a disconnect between available support services and provision of technologies to support neurodiverse students in higher education. Furthermore, great difficulties are posed by the fear of stigmatization in terms of what is available and what is actually utilized by neurodiverse students. As faculty become increasingly aware of the needs of neurodiverse students, it is imperative to continue to examine ways to best support this population, from both empirical and theoretical standpoints. Tips and strategies will be delivered for including neurodiverse students both in-person as well as via distance learning.


Indigenous Knowledge and Universal Design in the Shadow of COVID-19

Robin Quantick and David Newhouse, Trent University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

In 2017 Trent University confirmed that all incoming first year students would complete an Indigenous Content Requirement. In 2018 the Chanie Wenjack School for Indigenous Studies designed and delivered INDG 1002H, Critical Incidents in Modern Indigenous Life. This presentation will explore the interconnected design and delivery outcomes of this course, where 75 percent of our students report they would not be taking this course if it weren’t a degree requirement. In this context, teaching in a remote online environment poses significant challenges to student engagement and learning. In this session we explore three outcome effects: the use of Indigenous Knowledge as a catalyst in a universal design process; the creation of assessed learning activities that challenge 500 years of colonization; and the creation of curriculum that empowers students to become active participants in reconciliation.


Maximizing Equitable Learning Opportunities in Hyflex Courses

Jeni McMillin, Kristie Lussier, and Toni McMillen, Collin College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced teaching and learning into an online environment that has proven challenging for both educators and students. These challenges, however, have compelled many to reconsider the role online learning holds in terms of improving learning opportunities for marginalized populations. Hyflex course models provide students with opportunities to engage in learning environments that allow them to overcome some of the hurdles and issues that have kept them from success in more traditional course modalities. In this session, the facilitators will present various models of hyflex learning and explore the advantages and disadvantages of the presentation mode in terms of improving equity to all students. Participants will be given an opportunity to share their insights and suggestions for increasing motivation and engagement for marginalized students. Even after the pandemic, students often need more flexible learning environments, particularly those students who may face challenges due to health, family, and/or socioeconomic status.


Universal Design as a Universal Practice: Creating Equitable Experiences in Face-to-Face and Virtual Settings

Ramona Hall, Cameron University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

According to the Centre for Excellence in Universal Design, universal design (UD) is the design and structure of an environment so that it can be understood, accessed, and used to the greatest extent possible by all people regardless of their age or ability. How can this concept be realized across a range of learning environments? This session will highlight techniques that are effective in creating diverse, equitable and inclusive educational experiences for all students regardless of format. Having heightened awareness, a sturdy understanding of UD, and practical strategies as its key objectives, this presentation is relevant to all who want to better understand this area of study.


Walk the Talk: Design (and Teach) an Equitable and Inclusive Course

Ching-Yu Huang, Virginia Commonwealth University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

How do we design and teach a course that is inclusive and equitable for all students and their learning? How do we address diversity, inclusion, and accessibility issues without feeling awkward and uncomfortable? In this session, we will explore key inclusive pedagogical practices from perspectives for course design that strive to serve the needs of our students and support their success. Topics include an inclusive classroom environment, an equitable course structure (scaffolding to support rigor and maintain high expectations for all students), additional support and accessibility for all, grading for equity, and incorporating diversity into our classroom and curriculum. Participants are expected to participate in small group discussions and will brainstorm and personalize inclusive teaching practices to redesign their classrooms.


Introducing Racism and Inequities Through Small Group Fact-Sheet Assignments

Meghan Owenz, Penn State University, Berks
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Students often have difficulty openly discussing race and racism within the classroom. This session provides an overview of antiracist pedagogy and provides one course activity to increase student engagement during discussions of racism and health inequities. Inquiry-based instruction is a pedagogical strategy in which students are provided a question along with scaffolding and resources in order to generate their own conclusions. In this instructional example, students worked in small groups to review fact sheets regarding human service populations. Students were given definitions and guided questions to identify health inequities. Session participants will be provided an overview of antiracist pedagogy, inquiry-based instruction, and the specific resources used within two undergraduate classes to introduce students to antiracism and health inequities.



Topical Area 8: Teaching in the Health Sciences

Curricular Design on Demand: A How-to Framework

Karen Gordes, University of Maryland Baltimore and David Bunnell, Frostburg State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

No more apparent has the need for flexibility and diversity of educational delivery become clearer than what we have seen during the time of a global pandemic. Educators across the spectrum of higher education have had to be quick on their feet to rapidly convert, revise and devise new curriculum. This session will describe strategies for developing timely, and nimble curricular threads, by reviewing a structural framework used to build a Telehealth curriculum for implementation into competency-based medical education programs. Attendees of this session will learn how to keep pace with evolving graduate expectations using the principles of backward design and outcome-based education to thread a new curricular track with up-to-date competencies into an existing educational program, while still keeping a focus on student-centered instructional strategies and assessments, including the use of standardized patients.


Faculty Strategies to Support Student Success in Online and Hybrid Nursing Courses

Anne Tumbarello, Molloy College
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this opic.

This session will examine faculty strategies to support the success of nursing students in online and hybrid courses. Learning Management System tools, faculty teaching strategies, and course design considerations will include the use of announcements, course analytics, virtual office hours, feedback options, group projects, papers, surveys, and exams. A focus on identification of students who may be struggling in a course will also be included.


The Space to Make Mistakes: Student-Committed Medication Errors

Catharine Schiller, University of Northern British Columbia
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

A medication error by a student nurse often results in the student fearing its potential impact on the patient, unit staff, and the student’s educational journey. Students must navigate two parallel systems during a clinical placement–educational and healthcare–and there can be confusion about what each requires of the student. This exploratory mixed-methods study examined the process by which responsibility and accountability for a medication error is allocated and the factors that influence that allocation. It described features of an ideal allocation process, and suggested reasons why the current process often does not meet those requirements. Students are colliding with a post-error environment they view as not meeting ideals of a just culture: fairness, transparency, minimization of fear, and dedication to learning. Findings can be used to drive change that will better support those involved in a post-error process and decrease inconsistencies that are often of concern.


How COVID-19 Related Restrictions Enhanced Clinical Education

Ann Beste-Guldborg, Kayla Fisher, and Erin Holt, Minot State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

This session will provide information on new ways of thinking about clinical education as a result of restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. It will cover tele-therapy, tele-supervision, tele-education, and tele-mentoring as well as simulations and clinical rounds. The session will provide insight and tips on how to incorporate these methods into a well-rounded clinical rotation for students. Participants will also learn how instruction and clinical skills were enhanced as a result of these teaching methods. Topics include navigating professional standards for simulation and tele-supervision; use of technology as a method of interactive supervision in clinical education; set-up and delivery of clinical mentoring through technology; use of clinical simulations to enhance teletherapy; use of clinical simulation and tele-therapy debrief sessions and clinical rounds to facilitate clinical growth.


Meaningful Mental Health Simulation: Human Scenarios

Amy Richards, Rogers State University and Abby Harris, YCO Alliance
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Clinical practice in nursing school is key to develop and practice new-found skills learned. In the mental health setting, these skill sets require an enhanced ability to assess the non-verbal cues, including body language and eye contact. Although consistent clinical experiences are desired, educators are aware that no two clinical rotations offer the same opportunities. In mental health, clinical spots are few which means the clinical practice experience for the student may lack in rigor. To provide a consistent experience, a mandatory human simulation was created for mental health clinicals. A unique script and setting was used for each student group. Although the scenario and the faculty actors were consistent, the behavior, responses, and interactions with each of the student groups were delightfully diverse. Human simulation is an excellent option for students in their practicum.


Research Coach Model to Enhance Evidence-based Practice for Undergraduate Nursing Students

Melba D’Souza, Thompson Rivers University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Working with a research coach to engage in evidence-based nursing through case studies engages students in learning activities designed to help them explore, understand, synthesize, and apply problem-solving skills in evidence-based practice. After participating, the students were more prepared to capture, select, and organize their critical thinking skills in evidence-based nursing practice education. Students perceived that they needed more skills in interpretation, synthesis, and application of evidence-based nursing. The research coach model enables critical thinking and problem-solving skills through case studies. The findings suggest that the research coach model has an impact on promoting problem-solving skills in evidence-based nursing.


Teaching Writing for Students in the Health Sciences

Ann Martin, Louisiana State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Students in the health sciences want—and need—writing courses that prepare them for their professions. Writing faculty want—and need—students who are hungry to learn disciplinary writing skills. Design it and they will come! Composition courses for health sciences majors benefit students, instructors, writing programs, professional schools, and even patients. Learn about a pre-nursing composition course including content, assignments, goals and objectives, and classroom dynamics. This kind of course can benefit everyone involved: students, faculty, university writing program, nursing school faculty, and even patients. I will conclude by offering a “starter pack” of planning and teaching strategies for interested composition instructors.


Just Text Me: Let’s Get REAL with Clinical Supervision

Erin Holt, Mary Huston, Robyn Walker, and Kayla Fisher, Minot State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Safe, efficient, and effective real-time supervisory feedback in educational settings has always been challenging. Student clinicians and educators consistently indicate specific, immediate feedback during clinical sessions is their preferred instructional method (Lorino, Delehanty, & Woods, 2016); however, it has become extremely difficult during the COVID-19 pandemic. One speech and language clinic found the use of smartwatch technology an innovative way for educators to provide “bug in the ear” feedback to students in real-time with minimal disruption to the session. During this session, participants will learn how to incorporate wearable technology into their supervision, learn effective methods of giving feedback in this format, and adapting level of supervisor supports as applied to Anderson’s Continuum of Supervision.



Topical Area 9: Instructional Vitality: Ways to Keep Teaching Fresh and Invigorated

Advisory Board Session

The Best Citizenship Advice I Have Received

Ken Alford, professor, Brigham Young University

What can teachers do to help their students, peers, and leaders be successful? How can teachers more effectively fulfill their citizenship responsibilities? This presentation shares citizenship advice gleaned from outstanding professors during the past forty years. Some of their suggestions may surprise you. This session will help you recognize and understand a wide variety of citizenship behaviors; evaluate your own citizenship style; consider how you might improve your effectiveness as a contributing faculty citizen; and motivate you to improve your citizenship service.


5 Hallmarks of an Emotionally Intelligent Professor and Classroom

Craig Domeck, Palm Beach Atlantic University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more.

Boost the “EQ” (emotional intelligence) of yourself and your students as you cultivate the classroom culture to enhance learning. EQ is the most important component to effective teaching, differentiating great professors from good professors. This practical session will highlight five crucial competencies—positivity, self-leadership, relational support, focus, and anchoring—and provide tangible skills for cultivating each. By participating in this session, the learner will know what each of these five components looks like in a highly EQ professor, be equipped with a skill in each of these five realms and discuss how these five EQ hallmarks can be cultivated in the classroom.


Beyond Engagement: Empowering Undergraduate Learners Through Agency

Michelle Blank, Trine University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Aaah- the world is out of control! That may be the sentiment many of us have had throughout this past year, both in our lives and in our classrooms. Imagine feeling that lack of control regularly, with regards to your own learning. Yikes! According to learning science research, this is where many of our students are. They have been conditioned to be compliant and follow the rules; not to engage in true learning, not to take risks, and certainly not to fail. What if we changed that? In this session, we’ll build on the active learning strategies you are currently utilizing as a means of empowering undergraduate students toward becoming empowered adult learners with agency to make decisions and motivation that comes from creating. After exploring examples from both praxis and research, we will apply the principles of learner empowerment to design for agency through both learner and teacher decision-making and as motivation.


Put the Hammer Down and Build Your Teaching Toolbox

Jeremy Rentz, Trine University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Professors lecture a lot, even though research says lecture is not the most effective strategy for student learning. The faithful “hammer” in your teaching toolbox, lecture is easy to wield in any teaching format and it makes you feel comfortable. But if student learning is what you truly desire for your classes, you need some new tools. You don’t have to completely abandon your trusty hammer, just put it down now and then so you can engage students in “learning moments”. Learning moments are those times in class when all students are working with course material, and you have stepped out of the way. Surprisingly painless and easily implemented, many strategies are available to construct these learning moments. Focusing on intentional questions to drive student retrieval, we will help you add a variety of powerful tools to your repertoire. During the session be prepared to participate in and create learning moments.


Redefining Teaching Evaluation: A Case Study in Peer Feedback

Erica Caton and Maria Reid, Florida International University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is experienced in this topic and is ready to learn more.

Limited in their ability to provide timely, actionable, and unbiased feedback that supports faculty development in teaching, the current evaluation of teaching practices employed by many universities warrant review and revision. In this session, colleagues share a department’s response to a newly adopted vision of teaching excellence and the subsequent redesign of teaching evaluation guidelines that include a required peer feedback component. Participants will learn about the journey to revise a university’s evaluation of teaching policy, one department’s decision to focus on the development of a peer feedback training module. Participants will have an opportunity to reflect on their university and or departments’ current evaluation of teaching policy and practices, identify strengths and areas for growth, consider ways to include and use peer feedback in their evaluating teaching practice and begin to draft questions and action plans for doing this work at their institutions.


Self-Care for Faculty: Managing Burnout, Compassion Fatigue, and Secondary Trauma

Tami Micsky, Slippery Rock University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Higher education faculty face a variety of unique challenges when working with students, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has increased stress, loss experiences, and grief reactions. To maintain wellness and instructional vitality, faculty should have an understanding of the risks of burnout, compassion fatigue, and secondary trauma, as well as methods to counter various risk factors. Participants will utilize tools to assess burnout, organizational components of burnout, personal professional satisfaction, and current coping mechanisms. The presenter will share strategies for incorporating self-care into daily practices and assist participants in creating a measurable, goal-oriented self-care plan.


Collaborative Mentorship: Good for the Goose and the Gander

Katherine Wilford, Kunal Bhanot, Navpreet Kaur, University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

The world of academia can be overwhelming. As a result, new faculty who are not well-prepared often struggle in their new role. Many colleges and universities implement mentorship to support new faculty for a successful transition. However, traditional mentorship models are unidirectional and believed to benefit only the mentee. Limitations of the current model include a lack of shared goals between mentor and mentee, choice in mentor/mentee, and potential professional development for the mentor. Collaborative mentorship will allow for shared decision-making between mentor and mentee and ensure both individuals benefit from the experience. Attendees will be able to: define a collaborative mentorship model; compare this model to traditional models; and apply recommendations to improve mentorship models at their college/university.


Revising and Updating Assignments

Kaye Temanson, North Dakota State University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Learn to set goals, using backward design, on ways to improve and revise an old assignment. Learn to update and revise an assignment for more fresh ideas for online classes.



Topical Area 10: For New Faculty

“I Love this Class”: Five Fundamentals for Every Good Teacher

Anthony Sweat and Hank Smith, Brigham Young University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Teaching is an art. Just as there are basic principles that make great art, there are also fundamental concepts any teacher can learn to create great teaching and learning. In this presentation for newer university-level teachers, we will cover five fundamentals for effective teaching, regardless of your background or discipline, including: efficient and effective course design, inviting meaningful student participation in learning, creating and maintaining good student rapport, preparing engaging and relevant lectures, and clear and fair assessments. Participants will leave empowered to create and deliver an effective course that yields more positive student evaluations in their formative university teaching years.


I’m a Biologist, not a Psychiatrist! Compassion Fatigue and Advisors

Christina Lesyk, State University of New York (SUNY)/College at Canton
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

How prepared are you to work with students who have experienced trauma or neglect and exhibited behaviors such as impulsivity, poor problem-solving skills, anxiety, eating disorders, suicidal ideation, substance abuse, and a lack of social skills? You could have a counseling center on campus, but you are often the first line of defense before that probably overwhelmed counseling center. Added to the usual pressures of academic position, it is no surprise that academic advisors experience compassion fatigue from continually experiencing and absorbing secondary traumas from today’s students. While there are similarities to PTSD and burnout, compassion fatigue uniquely impacts those who are expected to empathize—like you! In this session, a model for understanding the causes of compassion fatigue will be presented with prevention and self-care strategies and as a catalyst for systemic change.


Integrating Active Learning Strategies in the Classroom

Erin Hagar and Violet Kulo, University of Maryland, Baltimore
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Educators increasingly recognize the value of engaging students in their learning experiences. While short, targeted lectures can be effective tools to communicate content and instructor enthusiasm, lectures as the sole instructional strategy may not result in optimal student outcomes. “Active learning,” often defined as any strategy that asks students to do things and think about what they are doing, can help increase student motivation, engagement, retention and transfer, as well as improve learning outcomes. Active learning (AL) strategies can include learner-centered activities integrated into a lecture, or more robust approaches like team-based or problem-based learning. This session will provide faculty an opportunity to experientially explore active learning strategies that can easily be incorporated into the classroom.


Meaningful Course Design to Increase Student Engagement with Course Readings

Brian Baldi, University of Massachusetts and Rebecca Petitti, Columbia University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Many teachers, particularly new teachers, grapple with engaging students deeply with assigned course readings. Some scholars have suggested that digital reading habits complicate efforts to instill deep reading habits (Miller, 2016). Teachers often report a variety of reasons why students may not engage deeply with course texts, including workload, ability or skill level, interest in material, and surface reading habits. The literature on assigning course readings, however, suggests that students will engage with readings when teachers embed intentional and scaffolded reading activities into their course design (Brown et al, 2014; Miller, 2016; Nilson, 2016). By the end of this session, participants will be able to: choose the right readings, integrate readings into their course design, frame course readings, and teach effective reading strategies. Participants will leave the session with some new resources, tools, and practices that they can try in their own classes.


Teaching Trauma-Burdened Students: Life Balancing Self-Care Strategies for Educators

Susan Egbert and Sean Camp, Utah State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Secondary trauma is an inherent reality for education professionals who are exposed to the difficult stories of students and who witness their struggles and pain—a phenomenon particularly prevalent in the era of COVID-19. Self-awareness and self-care practices are critical if educators are to maintain a healthy life balance and avoid compassion fatigue and burnout. This interactive session addresses: recognizing and responding to trauma-reactive behavior in students; potential sources of vicarious trauma experienced by education professionals; early warning signs of secondary traumatic stress; and compassion fatigue prevention and safety planning for effective self-care. Participatory learning and real-world application will be emphasized throughout the session.


Creating a Model for Student Behavior and Effective Assessment

Sarah Schillage-Truxillo, Southeastern Louisiana University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

New instructors often do not have a history of education courses on their curriculum vitae unless education is their declared discipline. In this session, learn about how to address the gap in educational training and create a model for student behavior as well as a calibration resource for assessing student achievement.


New College Faculty and the New College Student: Developing Faculty Skills to Match Student Needs

Neva Cramer and Joan Bowman, Schreiner University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In a changing demographic affected by economics, exposure to trauma, and now a pandemic, the new college student is non-traditional in almost all aspects and requires a new set of skills that has the potential to energize the learning environment and motivate the professor. Come away prepared to form more effective relations with students which build trust and accountability, increase participation through strategies that offer unique opportunities for equity of expression and performance of understanding, and gain a better understanding of the effects of trauma and poverty and how this should inform your classroom pedagogy on a daily basis.



Topical Area 11: Faculty Support

Invited Session

Creating a Collaborative Community of Online Instructors with an Online Teaching Faculty Toolkit

Mandi Campbell, instructional designer and Myrna Gantner, associate professor, University of West Georgia

Learn how a cross-disciplinary group of online instructors both contributed to and benefitted from the Online Teaching Faculty Toolkit, an online teaching resource that served as a bridge between technology and pedagogy to help faculty as they prepared to teach online. The Online Teaching Guides within the toolkit offer instructional solutions and strategies that help instructors engage their students and deepen their learning. In addition to offering concrete, evidence-based instructional strategies, these guides link to Ed Tech Aids that provide instructions for using various tools in faculty-friendly language, a list of references, and a growing number of two-minute videos made by instructors who tested and refined the strategies in their own online classes. Social and collaborative learning theories informed our thinking about the importance of not just offering at-the-ready resources but also establishing a community of online instructors. In connecting faculty, we fostered collective efficacy and benefited from the same kind of socialized learning experiences that we strive to create for our students in the online environment. Participants in this session will critique a faculty-developed Online Teaching Faculty Toolkit that supports the design and delivery of quality online courses; recognize the value of a community of online instructors with a pedagogical focus that works collaboratively to solve common problems of instructional practice; and discuss ways to build the capacity of faculty mentors who can share their online instructional expertise with each other, including those who are new to online teaching.


Faculty Professional Development Through E-Team Teaching During Emergency Remote Teaching

lknur Bayram and Özlem Canaran, Ted University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Rooted in Vygotsky’s Sociocultural Theory (1978) and the concept of Zone of Proximal Development (1978), teacher collaboration through collaborative arrangements such as lesson study, collaborative action research and team teaching have attracted widespread attention in the field of teacher professional development in higher education (HE). The aim of this presentation is to share a C&TL new faculty development program through e-team teaching during emergency remote teaching. The participants are two full-time faculty at the department of English Language Teaching at a foundation university in Turkey and a mentor with a PhD on teacher professional development. The purpose of the program was to explore the feasibility and sustainability of e-team teaching as a tool to encourage instructional growth of the new faculty by peer observation, collaboration and reflection, and investigate how the model could be integrated into faculty professional development.


Capturing the Aha! Moment: A Socratic Dialogue Game for Faculty Development

Megan Hennessey, Air University; Abram Trosky and Kristan Wheaton, U.S. Army War College, Applied Communication and Learning Laboratory
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

In 2020-2021, the U.S. Army War College piloted a card-based game allowing faculty to practice discussion-based facilitation strategies. The game fills a gap in educational methodologies by developing faculty members’ skills with advanced discussion facilitation techniques. An argumentation mechanic in the game design encourages players to defend their choices, while a “school solution” is offered as a sample facilitation strategy. The objectives of the game are to: teach players the six basic types of questions typical in a Socratic dialogue and how to use them appropriately and teach the process of bringing a classroom discussion to a Socratic conclusion, known as aporia, within an allotted period of time. During this session, presenters will provide an overview of the game design while offering an open and free sign-up sheet for game distribution and continued communications.


Moth Storytelling: A Tool to Strengthen Collegiality in Higher Education

Rui Niu-Cooper, Mary Bair, David Bair, and Nagnon Diarrassouba, Grand Valley State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

As higher education institutions become increasingly diverse, it is imperative that they provide support/training for employees to work in a harmonious, positive, and productive ways. In this session four faculty members, from four different cultural and professional backgrounds, share their experiences of participating in a faculty development project where we learned, practiced, and adopted Moth storytelling techniques. Participants will learn how to initiate a faculty learning community centered on storytelling. They will also learn how to use the process of storytelling to create a safe space for faculty to be vulnerable and develop empathy for one other, build closer personal relationships, and eventually, strengthen collaborative working relationships. Finally, they will learn how the process of telling and listening to stories can help faculty grow as reflective practitioners.


Moving from Remote Emergency Teaching to Deliberate Online Course Design

Tonka Jokelova and Christina Lesyk, SUNY Canton
60-Minute Session
Audience: Is new to this topic.

Historically, limited financial support and discussion suggest that faculty development is viewed as less of a priority than instruction, service, and scholarship, activities viewed as more directly contributing to student success and institutional reputation. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty all over the world were suddenly forced to shift to emergency remote teaching. While online learning has existed for decades, the current education environment of uncertainty and the need for rapid learning environment shifts brought to the surface an even greater need to provide systematic faculty development in online course design. In this session, we will discuss the summer 2020 launch of a new online course design institute attended by faculty from a wide variety of disciplines. The presenters will lead participants in analyzing a three-tiered faculty training (technology, pedagogy, and mentorship) and share lessons learned from both an instructional design and faculty point of view.


New2OSU: A Gamified, Comprehensive Faculty Preparation Program

Brooke Howland and Kelby Hahn, Oregon State University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Oregon State University offers a comprehensive program designed to impact student achievement by accelerating the teaching success of new(er) faculty. Working on a self-paced learning adventure, faculty enrolled in New2OSU develop the knowledge and skills necessary to build supportive, interactive, and instructionally sound learning environments. Further, faculty build connections across the university community and learn about available resources for teaching, student learning, and scholarship. Using a Hyflex approach, the program spans at minimum nine months and requires faculty to invest approximately 3 hours each week. Universal Design principles are embodied within this gamified program. Our session will model these elements as you learn about the program’s evolution and consider adopting or adapting features for your own institution. PLAYER ONE READY? Read the Gamer’s Guide, go on missions, earn expedition points, advance through levels, and earn badges. CLICK TO PLAY!


Transformational Coaching: Bridging the Gap in Professional Learning

Julia Osteen and Hope Nordstrom, Lipscomb University
60-Minute Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

Traditionally, professional development for higher education faculty has consisted of a one-size-fits-all approach that is lecture-based or outside expert-led sessions. Instead, current research highlights the need for faculty development efforts that are responsive to faculty members’ needs and reflective of higher education’s ever-changing landscape. Coaching can fill this need. Establishing a higher education faculty coaching program alongside other professional learning programming can support educators’ continued learning. Transformational coaching provides a structure for this type of coaching program. This session will share how one institution implements the use of transformational coaching within faculty development efforts. Participants will walk away with a theoretical basis for such a program, a better understanding of the benefits of coaching, and ideas for implementing a coaching program.


Leadership in Digital Environments: Here’s Why and Here’s How

Holly Atkins and Lin Carver, Saint Leo University
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with thistopic.

This participant-driven session provides attendees with theoretical foundations of effective integration of technology, a rationale for that integration, and resources and methods for supporting others in their growth in technology integration. Theoretical principles such as SAMR and TPACK will be discussed and connected to real-world scenarios, emphasizing leadership in implementing faculty technology implementation to support student learning. Participants will engage in brief application activities and leave with follow-up activities that can be completed in small groups or individually, as well as examples of technology tools to engage students in on-ground, online, and hybrid classroom environments.


Peer Mentoring with Online Learning Champions

Liz Norell, Chattanooga State Community College
20-Minute Mentor Session
Audience: Has some experience with this topic.

When colleges and universities around the world transitioned to fully online/virtual learning in March 2020, many faculty who had never contemplated online teaching were suddenly asked to become experts, often with very little training or assistance. This session shares one model for rapidly developing a network of peer mentors trained in best practices to support colleagues within their departments/divisions. We’ll discuss how the Online Learning Champions program was developed, what training the “champions” received, and how they spread that knowledge through the college during the 2020-2021 academic year. Attendees will leave with a scalable, manageable model for diffusing best practices on their campus, no matter its size.



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